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These seem to be growing in popularity in recent years and better suited to this sub forum than the main TV section.

 

Started watching the 3rd series of All or Nothing last night on Netflix, this is an all access behind the scenes doc following a US college football team (which is oddly huge in the US and gets huge crowds and full TV coverage) - The first 2 seasons were brilliant, and the 3rd takes the format but at a different university. The coach in this one seems the most unpleasant individual committed to film in a long time (even compared to Buddy in seasons 1&2).

 

Netflix has a 6 part series following Juve last season, First Team, but its very lightweight and suffers from lack of access, 90% of it is match conferences, press conferences and players talking whilst driving their cars (mostly Buffon). Its a real puff piece Nd totally avoids any insight or controversy, Buffon saying Michael Oliver had a municple trash can for a heart doesn’t warrant a mention. What is odd is how most of Juve’s signage and merch is written in English. 

 

Amazon has their rival All or Nothing series - the first 3 seasons of this followed big NFL teams, but there is now a college spin off (really good with a nice coach this time) and an All Blacks rugby one. Coming soon is a Man City version for last season and be intrigued to see if they get the same access the NFL teams gave them, dressing rooms and all.

 

Final shout is to something I'd missed originally - The Four Year Plan, it follows QPR a few back when taken over by Lakshmi Mittal, Flavio Briatore and some other billionaire chums, and its a proper warts and all horror show for most concerned

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Four-Year-Plan-Amit-Bhatia/dp/B0778NJDQK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1532154905&sr=8-5&keywords=qpr 

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The Last Gladiators is a good watch. It’s a stark insight into the now diminishing role of hockey enforcers and the sometimes detrimental effect it’s had on these players. The Chris Nilan parts are eye-opening in particular.

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5 minutes ago, Sureshot said:

The Last Gladiators is a good watch. It’s a stark insight into the now diminishing role of hockey enforcers and the sometimes detrimental effect it’s had on these players. The Chris Nilan parts are eye-opening in particular.

 

To add to this, Red Army is a fascinating insight into the Soviet Union Ice Hockey Team. 

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20 minutes ago, ckny said:

The Juve show is good background TV. Second season has just been released and starts with the Spurs Champions League games.

 

I found it pretty tedious - it was a puff piece - if you like watching Buffon be over earnest and moody in nice clothes though its a good watch. 

 

For a good sports doc I'm looking for something really revealing and behind the scenes

 

Reminded me about Trophy Kids which seems to have dropped off UK Netflix - this shows pushy parents behind the future generation of sports stars.

 

The short game is similar but focusses solely on golfing kids - its a sobering story and an uncomfortable watch in places IIRC. 

 

https://www.netflix.com/watch/70290567?trackId=13752290&tctx=0%2C1%2C62beb3f98f1ab53c09f75cf16deaca3e522508ef%3Ab5d1b81c6f9f9f7b91b860da4fa8991b346a2f42%2C%2C

 

If people are recommending stuff be useful to say where its available please - thanks.

 

 

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Think the 3rd series of Last Chance U may be the best yet, by changing university they've kept it fresh and the thing is never allowed to flag or drop pace for a minute. Its such a well put together show.

 

They call it season 4 but there is also a 1h update on the main participants from the first 2 seasons, fair to say one of their stories takes a very dark turn.

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Another vote for the 30 for 30 series.  Recommended are:

 

Winning Time: Reggie Miller vs. The New York Knicks

The impact of Indiana Pacer Reggie Miller on the New York Knicks in the 1990s, specifically focusing on the Pacers/Knicks battles in the 1994 and 1995 NBA Playoffs and on Miller's interaction with Knicks fan Spike Lee.

 

The 16th Man

How hosting (and winning) the 1995 Rugby World Cup and Nelson Mandela's support of the Springboks national team affected post-apartheid South Africa.

 

The Two Escobars

The lives of soccer player Andrés Escobar and drug lord Pablo Escobar; the intertwining of crime and soccer in their native Colombia; and the connections between the murders of both men.

 

Four Days in October

The remarkable comeback of the Boston Red Sox against the New York Yankees in the 2004 ALCS.

 

Roll Tide/War Eagle

The continuing rivalry between Auburn University and the University of Alabama, focusing on the history between the two programs, the bad blood between their fans, and how this intense rivalry came to a pinnacle, just when they ended up needing each other most.

 

9.79*

A profile of the Men's 100 meter final at the 1988 Summer Olympics and the lives of the eight men who participated, including Ben Johnson (whose world record of 9.79 seconds was annulled after he tested positive for anabolic steroids) and Carl Lewis (who was awarded the gold medal after Johnson's disqualification).

 

Of Miracles and Men

An exploration of the Miracle on Ice from the point of view of the defeated Soviet Union team.

 

Hillsborough

A look at the April 15, 1989 tragedy at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England, where overcrowding in the stadium's standing-room-only areas killed 96 people and injured 766. The film examines the ongoing efforts of victims' families to seek exoneration of their loved ones, who were blamed in part by local authorities in an attempt to conceal police and security inadequacies. (2 hours in length)

 

I make those recommendations despite hating or having no interest in basketball, gridiron or baseball.  The hockey ones are great, although Kings Ransom (the Gretzky one) didn't tell me anything I didn't already know.  I can think of no higher recommendation than to say that my wife, who hates football was completely enthralled by The Two Escobars.

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Out of those I've only watched The Two Escobar's, but I really enjoyed Straight outta LA ,  which is about the Oakland Raiders and the rise of Hip Hop, June 17th, 1994 which was a massive day for multiple sports in America and it plays out mostly through news reports of the day, it's very well done.

 

Are they still on Netflix? I don't have a subscription at the moment but that's where I saw them.

 

I also watched Iverson on Netflix a while back, which follows 76ers legend Allen Iverson from his childhood through his trouble with the police to his retirement.

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The HBO Andre The Giant was on sky on demand recently , just got round to watching it.

 

Lovely doc really showing what oeople thougjt of him and not coming across as sugar coating his story. Never felt like it dragged either which is rate for me as my usual biggest complaint with docs is they are too long for the material.

 

well worth a watch, lots of great honest interviews, especially with Hulk Hogan and Vince McMahon

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Had a bit of a binge on Amazon's Man City All or Nothing last night and did 4 eps, overall its very enjoyable but not as good as I hoped for somehow compared to the NFL versions.

 

I think they have a structural problem with there being so many games, its hard to not feel rushed compared to NFL which invariably builds to a big game most eps - not much they can do about that I guess. The problem is with the games so thick and fast it can feel a little rushed and a bit like a club season review DVD in places.

 

That said the behind the scenes access when it comes is utterly fascinating - we've just never really got to see this before and I think this is the real winning aspect of the show. We get to see training, midweek tactics talks, pre and post game changing rooms and these are the bits I've enjoyed the most.

 

Clubs are in a battle for overseas support and I suspect this openness of the players and management will help greatly extend City's reach abroad - a bit like England in the summer everybody seems a lot more human when you don't only get to see them on the pitch, in the ludicrous post match interviews or talking to the print press who everybody mostly despises.

 

Be interesting to see how this goes as the only things clubs have left to sell is this sort of thing and I believe it'll be a powerful marketing tool when you have somebody as charismatic as Pep - maybe not so much if your manager is Jose.

 

Wonder if they've got an embedded crew in with anybody this year - my money would be on Liverpool with the Americans in charge seeing the marketing potential, and Klopp would probably come across well.

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I’d agree that the NFL documentaries are a bit better, it still seems a decent watch though. I’ve watched the first two and found the focus on some areas a bit weird so far.

 

For example, they’ve focused on Mendy in the first two episodes. Now he only played a couple of games for them before getting injured, so it wasn’t clear how important he would be to he team (and it still isn’t). Yet they’ve tried to frame the injury as a massive disaster, like they’ve lost this huge character who is key to Man City, when he’s actually just a new face in the dressing room. 

 

The amount of subtitles is a bit odd too, I’d have thought most of the footballers would have a better grasp on English than appears. 

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Agreed that it's not quite as good as it could be, but to be fair, I bet there is a load of footage that wouldn't see the light of day until the individuals were long out of the club.  I do find it as honest as it could be under the circumstances. (I've just got to the Pep/Arteta discussion post Sterlings miss at Burnley.)  The signing of LaPorte was interesting but I think they skated over the non-signing of Sanchez a bit.  There was a good line about "we don't have to spend that kind of money any more."

 

You see why Guardiola is so successful - he's really, really, intense, obsessive and extraordinarily detailed.  All while being a seemingly decent person.  Sure he's going to rip into them occasionally, but that is football.  The half time at Wigan was interesting!

 

All in all, definitely worth a watch.

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I finished the City doc and really enjoyed it - the best thing it does, and surely others have to follow and open up like this, is it humanises the club and some of the players - sometimes we forget that when we only see them on the pitch or touchline. City aren't alone in needing this, I think all the bigger clubs could do with a dose of it.

 

One of the things that does strike me with all of these documentaries is how much sitting around listening to manager speeches to bored/confused players there is - they really must get sick of the managers voice. 

 

Pep does come across really well, I know its carefully edited and shitty hissy fits may have been removed - but you can see how charismatic he is.

 

Hope they've got another club lined up and are filming this season too.

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One big difference between the Man City one and the American ones, I didn’t notice until about half way through, is no one talks about god, no prayer before games, etc.  In a way it’s quite refreshing.

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I've seen quite a few good ones over the years.  BT Sport have produced a few corkers such as 'Golazzo: The Football Italia Story' (An absolute must-see for any fellow fans of Channel 4's Football Italia), 'The Crazy Gang' & I think they did one on the Bradford City fire.

 

One Night in Turin & Gazza's Tears are a must-watch & of course the best documentary of them all was the infamous 'An Impossible Job' which was a fly-on-the-wall documentary about England's failure to quality for USA 94.  Poor old Graham Taylor...

 

The best Formula 1 documentary I have seen was called 'Grand Prix: The Killer years' which focused heavily on the 1960's eras lack of anything resembling common sense & safety.  The footage wasn't for the squeamish as they showed graphic footage of drivers burning to death in their cars etc, but it showed the lunacy of the sport and how Jackie Stewart fought to have mandatory things like crash barriers installed at circuits instead of bails of hay.

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Grand Prix: The Killer Years was indeed a difficult watch, the same people did one on Group B rallying iirc.

 

I think it was this one

 

 

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I've watched all of the Man City documentary and really enjoyed it.  A very well polished product, well edited, famous narrator, cool camera angles etc and it's hard not to warm to people like Pep, Delph, Kompany et al when you see a bit more of them away from the pitch.

 

Then I saw this article earlier.  Eek.  https://medium.com/@NcGeehan/the-men-behind-man-city-a-documentary-not-coming-soon-to-a-cinema-near-you-14bc8e393e06

 

I'll admit I'm rather ignorant when it comes to stuff like this but it's rather menacing.

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For those who have been hoping some other teams have a camera crew/documentary team embedded for more Man City style entertainment, I read somewhere last week (in an article about the Man City doc) that Sunderland had a crew in for their last season's relegation from the Championship to League One. That should be interesting. Unfortunately I don't have any info of when/where it's due to be broadcast.

 

Edit - Here's the article:

 

Can Manchester City avoid the football documentary curse?

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/aug/17/manchester-city-the-football-documentary-all-or-nothing-amazon?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Copy_to_clipboard

 

Also mentioned in the article - Sunderland also had a crew in a few years ago when Peter Reid was the manager and they were relegated from the Premier league in 1997. I remember it being the sweariest thing I'd ever seen at the time. It was very entertaining (& not just because I'm a Newcastle supporter).

 

Article also mentions a few other football docs from years gone by.

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On 20/08/2018 at 13:38, wev said:

Grand Prix: The Killer Years was indeed a difficult watch, the same people did one on Group B rallying iirc.

 

I think it was this one

 

 

 

That was brilliant and well worth a watch so thanks for the link.

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What looks like the antidote docu-series to City & Pep all being wonderful, winning every week and meeting fine upstanding petro billionaire despots has gone up today on Netflix, following Sunderland last season. Looks promising

 

 

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On 14/12/2018 at 14:40, Gotters said:

What looks like the antidote docu-series to City & Pep all being wonderful, winning every week and meeting fine upstanding petro billionaire despots has gone up today on Netflix, following Sunderland last season. Looks promising

 

 

 

This is ace. It's the polar opposite to the Man City documentary - this is a club seriously in the shit, and watching it from the inside is bloody good tv.

 

Unless you're a Sunderland fan, of course.

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7 hours ago, Boothjan said:

 

This is ace. It's the polar opposite to the Man City documentary - this is a club seriously in the shit, and watching it from the inside is bloody good tv.

 

Unless you're a Sunderland fan, of course.

 

I suspect teams in trouble are more entertaining for this sort of thing, but it just feels a lot more open of an honest representation of things- despite not having dressing room access.

 

I suspect thats because of how well they integrate the fans into in.

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Yeah probably - the one part that really struck me was when the manager, chairman and some of the staff did a fans Q&A at a local pub and they simply didn't have a clue what to do to turn things around, and they all looked incredibly uncomfortable. The atmosphere was just dreadful.

 

My only issue with it is some really dodgy editing during matches! 

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2 minutes ago, Boothjan said:

 

My only issue with it is some really dodgy editing during matches! 

 

funny you say that, I've wondered about continuity a couple of times, shots of fans at the opening day of the season at home walking up to the ground in full winter coats (I know its sunderland but still its august !) and players in pre season training at home with cold steam coming out their mouths

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I'm enjoying it, three episodes in and it's starting to dawn on everyone that things are hopelessly bad. I'm pretty sure that when this documentary was commissioned everybody involved thought it would be a triumphant piece about promotion, right? 

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3 minutes ago, Gotters said:

 

funny you say that, I've wondered about continuity a couple of times, shots of fans at the opening day of the season at home walking up to the ground in full winter coats (I know its sunderland but still its august !) and players in pre season training at home with cold steam coming out their mouths

 

Yeah that and a few shots of Grayson during the match which are quite clearly taken from a totally different game!

 

1 minute ago, Naysonymous said:

I'm enjoying it, three episodes in and it's starting to dawn on everyone that things are hopelessly bad. I'm pretty sure that when this documentary was commissioned everybody involved thought it would be a triumphant piece about promotion, right? 

 

Yeah, the parallels to Wolves' season when we got relegated are striking. It's so hard to get rid of a losing mentality and so many teams think it's easy to bounce back from dropping to the championship. Some of the players clearly didn't give a fuck.  But Sunderland last year were in a far worse state than we were in 2013. 

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