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My Gamecube prediction


blue swIIrl

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I just can't be arsed. The evidence is all around you. PoP for £20 before the other versions hit the market. BGE for £15. Frequency for £5 for fucks sake. You can't get better than that. And these are not 'let's hunt down some shabby net trader and get done on delivery' bargains, these deals are available in your high street.

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I just can't be arsed. The evidence is all around you. PoP for £20 before the other versions hit the market. BGE for £15. Frequency for £5 for fucks sake. You can't get better than that. And these are not 'let's hunt down some shabby net trader and get done on delivery' bargains, these deals are available in your high street.

BG&E for the Gamecube: $20 with free 2 day delivery from Electronics Boutique. :angry:

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Fantastic deal if you live in the US.

Completely pointless if you live in the UK, like the rest of us.

Of course :angry:.

Actually though, games in the UK in general have better deals. Sure games are "officially" cheaper in the US, but you hardly ever see games discounted from their full price in the US unless the company officially discounts it. That and you never get free games bundled with hardware unless the manufacturer bundles them.

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Indeed. There does seem to be this dubiously beneficial situation whereby Game is simply wiping out the competition with little thought for the consequences. The irradication of rivals and independants will remove the backbone from games consumerism, making it seem homogenous and restrictive. Want a game? Go to Game. It's almost like 1984, but with far gaudier scenary. It'll be interesting to see what happens when Tesco and Asda decide to take Game to task. Long overdue, IMO.

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Indeed. There does seem to be this dubiously beneficial situation whereby Game is simply wiping out the competition with little thought for the consequences. The irradication of rivals and independants will remove the backbone from games consumerism, making it seem homogenous and restrictive. Want a game? Go to Game. It's almost like 1984, but with far gaudier scenary. It'll be interesting to see what happens when Tesco and Asda decide to take Game to task. Long overdue, IMO.

Walmart (who own Asda) don't seem to care about selling video games any cheaper than normal over here. I have to admit I'm not sure why - video games are probably the only thing you'll ever find in the US where they're never discounted or sold at varying prices in the USA.

Actually it's not true. Target occasionally will knock $2 off the price or one or two poorly selling GBA games. Thats it though.

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Profit margins on GBA titles are tight enough as it is, without cutting down the RRPs even more.

They had a budget range for the Gameboy though, so why not? Its a good way to make money out of otherwise dead games. Unless you're seriously suggesting that they can't make a profit selling GBA games for $20 instead of $30?

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Profit margins on GBA titles are tight enough as it is, without cutting down the RRPs even more.

Is this true? Surely not.

The profit margin from a 10 year old Snes game ported over to the GBA by about 10 people and then sold for £30 is low. If it is true then I'm amazed.

;)

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Is this true? Surely not.

The profit margin from a 10 year old Snes game ported over to the GBA by about 10 people and then sold for £30 is low. If it is true then I'm amazed.

;)

It's not so much the development costs (even though most GBA games aren't direct SNES ports, the dev costs are still comparatively low) as the price of cartridge media.

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Which has been dropping for years and years, but still the same old excuses persist. I can't remember any GBC cartridges being £35, despite being, at the time, comparatively expensive.

OK... Want to put out a third party GBA game for less than £30? It better not need a large ROM size or battery backup then.

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OK... Want to put out a third party GBA game for less than £30? It better not need a large ROM size or battery backup then.

If that's true then how come GBA games are usually $30 in the US, and sometimes come out at $20? Are Nintendo selling at a loss to the US (especially given the current weak dollar compared to the Yen)?

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If that's true then how come GBA games are usually $30 in the US, and sometimes come out at $20? Are Nintendo selling at a loss to the US (especially given the current weak dollar compared to the Yen)?

The usual £/$ direct conversion ratio.

I didn't say anything about Nintendo's own software, but obviously they're not selling at a loss, no.

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OK... Want to put out a third party GBA game for less than £30? It better not need a large ROM size or battery backup then.

Want to alienate your audience from the off with a ridiculously unattractive pricepoint? Fact is, there are plenty of GBA games that get released for substantially less than £30-35, just not by Nintendo. Oh no, it's the third parties that get the rougher ride and provide GBA's metaphorical budget range. Hooray for old wives tales is what I say.

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Is this true? Surely not.

The profit margin from a 10 year old Snes game ported over to the GBA by about 10 people and then sold for £30 is low. If it is true then I'm amazed.

:)

Most of the older games were written in Assembler, which is more difficult to port than you think.

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The usual £/$ direct conversion ratio.

I didn't say anything about Nintendo's own software, but obviously they're not selling at a loss, no.

That's got bugger all to do with " OK... Want to put out a third party GBA game for less than £30? It better not need a large ROM size or battery backup then."

Quite simply, if they can put out a GBA game for 20 or 30 USD and not suffer a loss in the US then they can afford to sell it at the same cost converted via the current exchange rate (the 1 USD == 1GBP is purely a money making exercise) plus any extra taxes (for example, VAT). Seeing as 30 USD is currently 16.28 GBP and 20 USD is 10.86 GBP (source: www.xe.com) they have to justify almost 100% again to sell a game that costs 30 USD for 30 GBP in the UK.

Face it, Nintendo are ripping Europe off on GBA carts. They can sell them cheaper.

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Want to alienate your audience from the off with a ridiculously unattractive pricepoint? Fact is, there are plenty of GBA games that get released for substantially less than £30-35, just not by Nintendo. Oh no, it's the third parties that get the rougher ride and provide GBA's metaphorical budget range. Hooray for old wives tales is what I say.

Um, yes, that's basically what I said ... third parties don't want to price their products out of the market, they have no choice.

Please show me these GBA games released "for substantially less than £30-35" - the last one I can think of was Bubble Bobble Old and New. Which was, iirc, a small ROM with no battery backup, in line with my previous comment.

I can't figure out what you're saying in the last couple of sentences, but I'm sure it's not of Earth-shattering import.

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Um, yes, that's basically what I said ...

Um, no, that's basically the complete reverse of what you said. You're saying that GBA games are expensive because of manufacturing costs. I am saying that this well worn urban myth is a lot of old shit, perpetrated to keep GB software prices static for nigh on ten years.

So, small solid state storage is expensive? Then why is it that every form of compact memory storage, from PC memory modules through USB storage to smartmedia, has dropped exponentially in price in the last five years? GBA games are expensive because Nintendo deem them to be expensive. These are not particularly complex devices in comparison to what's available on the market. In fact, one might be inclined to say that they're at the bottom end of a very large scale. Controlling the source and reaping the benefits, that's what Nintendo do. Proprietary formats are simply a way of making the most money from manufacture.

Please show me these GBA games released "for substantially less than £30-35"

You're probably in Game often enough. Open your eyes sometime.

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Um, no, that's basically the complete reverse of what you said. You're saying that GBA games are expensive because of manufacturing costs. I am saying that this well worn urban myth is a lot of old shit, perpetrated to keep GB software prices static for nigh on ten years.

So, small solid state storage is expensive? Then why is it that every form of compact memory storage, from PC memory modules through USB storage to smartmedia, has dropped exponentially in price in the last five years? GBA games are expensive because Nintendo deem them to be expensive. These are not particularly complex devices in comparison to what's available on the market. In fact, one might be inclined to say that they're at the bottom end of a very large scale. Controlling the source and reaping the benefits, that's what Nintendo do.

Sigh.

First party GBA games are expensive because Nintendo have no reason to charge any less than what the market will bear. I haven't ever disputed this.

Third party GBA games are expensive because the physical media is expensive.

Memory prices have dropped - no shit Sherlock. GBA carts however are proprietary pieces of media with a (significantly) higher cost per unit than discs. Like all ROM cartridges in fact.

Hence, smaller profit margins. Small enough profit margins for many, many third party GBA games to be canned because the publishers feel that the game can never rack up enough sales to amortise the initial cost.

I'm not defending Nintendo. (There's simply no need to care about the issue either way as cheap imports are so readily available.) I'm just pointing out the reality of the situation.

"Controlling the source and reaping the benefits, that's what Nintendo do." - Way to define the objectives of a platform vendor there.

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Memory prices have dropped - no shit Sherlock. GBA carts however are proprietary pieces of media with a (significantly) higher cost per unit than discs. Like all ROM cartridges in fact.

Proprietary media you say? Just like most solid state formats, then? Which as I have stated previously are comparatively cheap as opposed to GBA carts. Even IQue's portable memory cart is cheaper, despite being far larger and more technologically advanced. And surely if the technology is cheap enough to be reversed engineered and replicated, we shouldn't have to suffer these sorts of prices.

Irrespective of all of this, even if (and if is the word) the market conditions are still not right for for cheap cartridge based gaming media (despite the instances in other fields) then Nintendo shouldn't have chosen the format in the first place. It's simply another way of handing the market to Sony.

"Controlling the source and reaping the benefits, that's what Nintendo do." - Way to define the objectives of a platform vendor there.

Most hardware vendors control through licensing technologies, not through the means of production. Sony can't cap the price of a blank DVD any more than it can hinder the downward spiral of Minidisc.

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