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The Many Saints Of Newark - Sopranos movie


JohnC
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30 minutes ago, K said:

I thought that looked pretty good. Michael Gandolfini looks uncannily like his dad, although we'll have to see if he has the same charisma and intensity. Some interesting casting as well - Vera Farmiga looks like she's been made up to look a bit like Carmela Soprano.

Tony always did want to fuck his mother. :lol:

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I just want there to be a scene where a young Francis Ford Coppola overhears a young Silvio saying "just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in," then the camera pulls in to a close up on Coppola who's like

 

1QmGQ84B.jpg

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46 minutes ago, Darren said:

I just want there to be a scene where a young Francis Ford Coppola overhears a young Silvio saying "just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in," then the camera pulls in to a close up on Coppola who's like

 

1QmGQ84B.jpg

 

"He'd be squealing like some kinda soprano, here!"

 

Edit: I've just reminded myself of this amazing lyric from Hell's Wind Staff from GZA's Liquid Swords

 

"Like this ex-worker, tried to smuggle a half-a-key
In his left leg, even underwent surgery
They say his pirate limp gave him away
As the Feds rushed him, coming through U.S. Customs
Now look whose on the witness stand, singing
A well known soprano, a smash hit from Sammy Gravano"

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3 minutes ago, Ork1927 said:

Is it just me or did young Tony look partly CGId?

 

I’m not entirely sold on that trailer although 

 

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Ray Liotta showing up at the end certainly helps 

 

 

It's his son, I think.

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  • 2 months later...

Just back from watching this and really enjoyed it, great cast and some really good performances. 

 

Some nice throwbacks to the series and I'm not 100% as it's been a long time since I watched the show but I'm pretty sure some new revelations

 

I'd say 4/5 if you're a sopranos fan. I think if you're not invested in the characters then ymmv 

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Saw this on Saturday, really great to see an “adult” film (ie not a bloody super hero or live action reimagining of an old Disney cartoon) and it was really good.

 

If you’re looking for a good Mob film set in the 1960s, a la Goodfellas, then this is definitely for you. To be honest, you don’t really need to know The Sopranos to watch it, while it’s great to see younger versions of the characters, the story works really well as a stand-alone film. 
 

9/10 for me

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I didn't enjoy it much tbh. Gandolfini Jr was fantastic as Tony, he had the mannerisms down perfectly. Silvio on the other hand was horrific. I thought the storyline was too political and jumbled. One glaring thing was 

 

Spoiler

Dickie's wife can't have kids. His mistress looks exactly like Christopher. So the obvious thing is for her to be Christopher's mother, yes? So why was that opportunity totally missed out on?

 

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There’s some enjoyment to be had here if you’re a Sopranos fan, but overall I thought this was a bit of a mess. It’s attention wanders all over the place and the two plots that should be the core of the film - Dickie/Harold and Dickie/Tony both feel underserved.


Michael Gandolfini does an admiral job of portraying a Tony who hasn’t become a mobster yet. Most of the other performances are decent as well, but the guy playing Silvio feels like he wandered in off an SNL sketch.
 

There’s far more brutally on the nose Disney prequel style fanservice in this than I’d have expected from David Chase as well.

 

Spoiler

The clunkingly awful narration by the ghost of Christopher had to have been a last minute mandate from the studio surely? 

 

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I thought Silvio was alright, perhaps the guy overdid it, but it felt like Silvio to me - Steve Van Zant was always hamming it up anyway. Corey Stoll was decent as Junior, but Vera Farmiga stole the show as Livia. 

 

I thought Michael Gandolfini was shit. Yeah, he looks a bit like his dad ... but that was the only thing right about his "performance" his whiny nasal voice was way off. There were tiny little glimpses of Tony, but nothing more. 

 

As for the film as a whole, it's alright. I'm in no rush to watch it again, but as someone who only earlier this year re-watched the entire series, it was a nice little slice of fan service.

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2 hours ago, Thor said:

 

 

I thought Michael Gandolfini was shit. Yeah, he looks a bit like his dad ... but that was the only thing right about his "performance" his whiny nasal voice was way off. There were tiny little glimpses of Tony, but nothing more. 

 

 

 

I'm pretty sure I don't look, sound, move and act the same as I did as a teenager.

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The unnecessary violence towards women in this film really bummed me out. Yeah I know the show is full of it, but here it served no purpose story wise, in my view.

Besides that, I thought the story was convoluted and confusing. Some nice throwbacks and funny moments, but on the whole it failed to explain so much of what I was hoping would be revealed (e.g. Tony’s mental health issues). A meh/10.

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2 hours ago, Doctor Shark said:

I'm pretty sure I don't look, sound, move and act the same as I did as a teenager.

And? He was still shit. His acting was awful. I doubt we'll see anything noteworthy from him in the future. Saying that, I vaguely recall thinking James Gandolfini was shit in everything I saw him in prior to The Sopranos, so what do I know? :)

 

On 27/09/2021 at 22:43, Thwomp said:

One glaring thing was 

 

  Reveal hidden contents

Dickie's wife can't have kids. His mistress looks exactly like Christopher. So the obvious thing is for her to be Christopher's mother, yes? So why was that opportunity totally missed out on?

 

Well....

Spoiler

Christopher's Mum is in the series (alcoholic, you may recall), and does not look anything like Dickie's mistress. She's also Tony Blundetto's sister (I think that's right).  But I know what you're getting at, why not have his mistress be the mother, with Dickie and Joanne hiding the shame of it. But there was never any hint during the series at all. It would have been a crap retcon.

 

1 hour ago, Gabzy said:

... on the whole it failed to explain so much of what I was hoping would be revealed (e.g. Tony’s mental health issues).

Yep, I was hoping for more on Tony, but I reckon they realised that Michael can't act for shit, and so had to write around that. Which is a shame, because that would have meant we'd have had more of Farmiga's brilliant take on Livia.

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It's just a mess, really. There's not much of a story to talk about, not helped by trying to shoehorn too much in and a lack of focus. The Dickie / Harold thing seemed really odd because, beyond the first scene they're in together, they actually don't seem to like each other, but their storyline is framed like they do. Similarly, Tony getting pissed off at Dickie felt out of place because there didn't seem to be much between them, really. For a film that's about gangsters, there's not a lot of gangstering going on, other than by the black characters. And it was just weird that Tony was shown to not want to be given stolen goods, but he's fine with essentially violently car jacking an ice cream van. There were about five times as many characters as needed, purely to show a younger version of ones from the series. 

 

It's not a good film. A waste of an opportunity and a waste of a couple of good characters. 

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I suppose I'm setting a low bar for a movie, but I thought this was all right. Ultimately superfluous perhaps, but there was enough there to stand alongside the series without too much embarrassment. To the point where I'm glad it exists rather than wish it was never made, which for prequels of much loved things seems like a bit of a result. Maybe without Michael Gandolfini I'd feel differently about it, but with him it's a nice little addition.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I watched this last night, and thought it was excellent. I suppose a film like this is pushing on an open door with me, in that I just love spending time with these characters and thought it captured the feel of the series perfectly. One of the most important themes of the series for me was how much of a person's character is innate and how much is down to their situation and choices, and something like this, where you get to see the key influences and upbringing of the most important character, was an absolute treat. I've seen people complaining that Tony Soprano was hardly in the film, but given that Dickie is Tony's de facto dad and hero, his life and unfortunate end are also Tony's backstory. I'm not sure it works as a film in is own right, but as a vehicle for putting across some additional depth and insight into key characters, I thought it was fascinating.

 

The only real negative was that I wanted more. I wish they'd done this as a mini-series, as I really wanted to get more into certain characters motivations, and to see the aftermath of particular events, particularly in the second half of the film. As a series, I'm sure they could have got a lot more mileage out of exploring things

Spoiler

like Junior's decision to kill Dickie, Giuseppina's decision to sleep with Harry, the aftermath of Dickie impulsively killing Giuseppina, the ascent and apparent success of Harry's criminal enterprise, etc. It felt like there were a few films in there - a criminal bromance between Harry and Dickie turning sour, the son of a gangster struggling with his own decisions, the uncool brother of a respected boss trying to carve out his own role while his brother was incarcerated, etc, and it seems like they tried to make all of them. A mini-series would have served all those stories better.

But I thought it worked sufficiently well on its own, and I feel like I know these characters pretty well - I'm happy to leave some things unspoken and slightly mysterious. 

 

There was some brilliant casting and performances, and some nice in-jokes. I particularly liked Artie Bucco briefly trying to act up and immediately getting slapped around by Dickie in exactly the same way Artie's brief forays into being a tough guy played out in the series. Everyone talks about how uncannily Michael Gandolfini resembles his father, but I was just as impressed with the actor who played young Janice Soprano, who not only looked EXACTLY like the older Janice but also looked enough like Tony to be his sister. The film was an interesting exercise in terms of how you replicate very personal, idiosyncratic performances with different actors, and showed a variety of approaches from replicating it exactly (i.e. Silvio Dante) to downplaying it massively (Paulie Walnuts). Vera Farmiga was particularly impressive in that she took one person's version of Livia Soprano and replicated it as a younger woman, while also taking on elements of Carmela Soprano, and somehow making it seem like a completely believable, three dimensional character. The Oedipal subtext was laid on a bit thick at times, but Vera Farmiga was incredibly good in the way that she blended Livia and Carmela into one person without making it seem like a cartoon character. I can't believe the director didn't ask the actor who played Silvio to turn it down a few notches - it's such an odd, ticcy performance that it seems like lunacy to try and copy it exactly - but the filmmakers mostly nailed it.

 

One thing that occurred to me after the film ended - was it implied that Ray Liotta's other role, as Dickie's uncle, was somehow a figment of Dickie's imagination? Sal seemed to spend a lot of time talking about death and rebirth, and there was one key scene that showed Dickie sat there in the visiting room on his own while Dickie goes off into another slightly fantastical reverie. I guess it raises the question as to why he'd be in here in the first place if Sal was a dream-mentor, but his scenes did seem interestingly unreal and separate from the rest of the film.

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1 hour ago, K said:

 

 

The only real negative was that I wanted more. I wish they'd done this as a mini-series, as I really wanted to get more into certain characters motivations, and to see the aftermath of particular events, particularly in the second half of the film. As a series, I'm sure they could have got a lot more mileage out of exploring things


I’ve started to rewatch the original Sopranos (up to Season 4) and that’s something that really strikes me as a bit odd about the Many Saints of Newark, it really felt like it would work so well as a series and it kind of goes against the grain of streaming television being more popular than traditional films.

 

The other thing that strikes me about Many Saints of Newark is just how lavish it looks compared to The Sopranos. David Chase said The Sopranos was heavily influenced by Goodfellas, yet it’s quite grubby compared to the glamour of Goodfellas. Which is probably more fitting with The Sopranos and I suppose gave it a bit of charm. Many Saints of Newark looked fantastic, like a large amount of budget was spent on it and it created an amazing world that I would love to see more of. Hopefully they have enough material to turn it into a 6 hour mini series or something.

 

1 hour ago, K said:

One thing that occurred to me after the film ended - was it implied that Ray Liotta's other role, as Dickie's uncle, was somehow a figment of Dickie's imagination? Sal seemed to spend a lot of time talking about death and rebirth, and there was one key scene that showed Dickie sat there in the visiting room on his own while Dickie goes off into another slightly fantastical reverie. I guess it raises the question as to why he'd be in here in the first place if Sal was a dream-mentor, but his scenes did seem interestingly unreal and separate from the rest of the film.

 

Yeah, I think he isn’t real but a figment of Dickie’s imagination. The final scene of Dickie at the prison cut to Dickie’s uncle suddenly disappeared and Dickie is by himself looking a but flummoxed. I took it that his uncle was just Dickie’s imagination, the whole conversation just playing out in his mind while he sat in the prison. It was good that it kind of acted like a precursor to Tony Soprano visiting a psychiatrist to discuss his problems. 

 

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