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Sunday Lunch


Sardan
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 So we have all been feeling really ill this week after going to one of those soft play parks which are contaminated with a million kid germs. So couldn't be fussed with a full Sunday roast. So I went with sausages and accompanying delights. I am particularly pleased with my Yorkshire puddings. I even do a little bit for the dog cos he likes his sunday dinner. 

 

Picture included. Don't worry everyone. The gravy went on at the table. 

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Look at my enourmous chicken:

 

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in a rush today. 

 

We went to comicon at the NEC so ate out at lunchtime. 

 

Today roast chicken. There is a carrot and half an onion in the tray. I'll add a couple of bulbs of garlic in a bit. The other half of the onion and a some fresh thyme is "up its bum" (no lemons :( ). That's butter under the skin and salt and pepper. 

 

Now to make the stuffing etc. 

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45 minutes ago, Foxworth said:

I understand it's a bit of a strange request and I have no doubt that that chicken would be too big but have you ever tried putting a whole bird in a slow cooker and using a probe to check doneness?  

 

I haven't.

 

I have kind of done the four basics in this thread. My plan is to use this thread to encourage me to mix it up a bit and try some other things. 

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You should look into it. For one it means you haven't got to keep checking the meat, two, you get to keep the oven for the food that needs a higher cooking temperature like roasters and yorkies and, three, you've never seen so little meat left on the bone. Oh yeah, the meat is so deliciously soft without adding anything other than your usual seasonings. No liquid needed whatsoever. 

 

The only downside is the lack of crispy skin, but you can save it and chuck it in the oven with a tray on top if you like that kind of thing. 

 

I'm not the most versatile cook, so I'm not one to preach but the slow cooker chicken is so simple. I usually throw it in there for just over 2 and a half hours on high and it's a perfect 72c. So simple and who doesn't like simple?

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Chuck chicken in slow cooker, put on high, cook for about two and a half hours. Season with whatever you normally do. Take out when its cooked and watch the meat fall away from the bone. If you like crispy skin, put it in the oven til it's to your liking. Seriously, it's that simple. Serve with whatever you like. 

 

I usually use the leftover meat in curry and pasta dishes. Don't want to sound like a patronising ass but it's really that simple and it means you have a little more tolerance with regards to time if your other things haven't quite cooked.

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No. Nothing. No water, no stock. Just put the chicken in. I suppose I throw a few sliced carrots or onions in the bottom so it doesnt stick. It's great for the summer when you don't want to heat the house even more with an oven on for hours on end. 

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Pot roast today - silverside 

 

season well and sear in a very hot, big frying pan then into a tray with veggies and stock, foil. Bottom oven for 7 hours or so. 

 

Had a check and it's up to temp so now on to the roasts and will use that juice and veg to make gravy. 

 

 

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Forgot to update this as we went as I got distracted by eating it. Ended up with roast tates and parsnips with brocolli and carrots. 

 

Silverside is alright. Wouldn't rush out for it again. The low and slow means it's cooked all the way through so no nice pink middle but very tender though, and the gravy made from the veggie stock was lovely. 

 

Leftovers - 

some went into the kids for tea tonight as French dips - 

thinly sliced beef given a quick sizzle in a pan then some gravy poured on. Into buns with a little bowl of gravy on the side for dipping. Kids very fond of these. 

 

I'm thinking some beef fajitas maybe relevant to my interests tonight. 

 

Going out on Mother's Day is never good. It's like Valentine's Day. 

 

Edit. Just had some very tasty French dips , the kids ones looked so good, had to get in on the action. 

 

Lots of french's mustard and a big pile of rocket. Delicious. 

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We love a roast and have one most weeks, not on a Sunday all the time due to my work.

 

The main issue we have is our kids turned out fussy and barely like any meat, chicken sometimes but often they just want the chipolata sausages and not the actual meat - I don't know how we went so wrong :(

 

My big thing in the roast is the spuds, I get that job and have a pretty nailed down technique with a 9 min par boil then dusted in a mix of semolina with salt & pepper into very hot fat or oil and a hot oven (pref 220+) 

 

I am a big convert to roasting the meat on the BBQ and that frees up the ovens esp if it a big family one.

 

Man I really want a roast now.

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2 hours ago, Davros sock drawer said:

That Cauliflower Cheese looks awesome @The Hierophant. Parmesan shavings?

 

Yep.

 

I parboil the cauliflower and make the sauce. It has cheddar and a bit of nutmeg. Parmesan on top and sometimes in the sauce as well. 

 

I always make plenty as the boys like macaroni and cheese so having some sauce in the fridge means it becomes a quick and easy tea for them. 

 

I bake it it in the oven for at least an hour. Covered with foil for about half the time. 

 

One word of caution. I generally use the water I cook the potatoes and veg in for the gravy. However do not use cauliflower water unless you want your diners to have a very 'windy' afternoon. 

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17 hours ago, Shimmyhill said:

My big thing in the roast is the spuds, I get that job and have a pretty nailed down technique with a 9 min par boil then dusted in a mix of semolina with salt & pepper into very hot fat or oil and a hot oven (pref 220+) 

 

I think the secret is cold potatoes and hot oil. I parboil the potatoes, preferably the night before. 

 

They then rest and the tray with fat (always goose and/or the fat from the meat) goes in the oven.

 

Then once the oil is hot and I am ready to cook the potatoes the tray goes on the hob, potatoes added salt and peppe, a quick toss in the Pan and into the very hot oven. The meat is normally out and resting at this point and I will make the gravy*. 

 

I don't add flour or semolina or anything to my potatoes I don't think they need it and it is a faff.

 

* we should probably cover gravy making. It's a real art.  

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Chucking some bicarb into the water when parboiling the spuds makes a difference, plus put the spuds into rapidly boiling water, don't bring to the boil with the spuds in.

 

Idea here is the bicarb does some chemical magic on the spuds breaking down the outside a little to give you a very soft outer, which absorbs the fat and gives that marvelous crunchy outer, by putting into the boiling water you aren't over cooking the innards, just softening the outer to get that surface for crisping up.

 

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2 minutes ago, The Hierophant said:

Yep, I always use boiling water from the kettle to do the potatoes. 

 

I might try the bicarbonate trick. How much do you use?  Do they cook more quickly?

 

Not a lot, half a teaspoon or so. It softens the outers of the potatoes for scuffing up, which gives you more surface area to coat in fat, then crisp up in a hot oven.

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  • 2 weeks later...

We had lamb yesterday as well. I had 11 round the table so I did a slow roast leg and shoulder. I didn't want to do a full roast though, as it's just too much grief. So we had Jersey Royals, Green Beans, and a warm salad of Peas, Broad Beans, Feta, Pea Shoots, and Watercress, plus Tsaztiki. It was a very light meal, despite the relatively fatty meat. Went down well. No pix, alas.

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I just made it up.

 

Ahead of time I dunked a bag of frozen broad beans in boiling water for a few seconds, then drained and peeled them (fiddly and time-consuming, but worth it). Kept those in the fridge.

 

Then on the day I just boiled some frozen peas, added the broad beans, drained, then tossed with two packs of feta cheese crumbled up, half of each bag of the pea shoots and watercress, and dressed it all with S&P, extra virgin olive oil, and lemon.

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