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The Hierophant

Sunday Lunch

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Amazingly I cannot find a thread on this so thought I better start one.  Do others here still have the traditional Sunday lunch?  We do almost every Sunday.

 

I'm doing a rib of beef today. Roast potatoes and parsnips, onion gravy, Yorkshire pudding carrots, green beans and broccoli. I normally do cauliflower cheese with beef but realised I didn't buy a cauliflower yesterday (last minute decision to do beef.)

 

In the summer we often substitute the traditional trimmings for a joint of meat barbecued and served with flatbreads, salad etc. 

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3 hours ago, The Hierophant said:

 

It's a small rib, 1.5kg, but enough for two adults and three children. I often struggle to cook smaller joints well so we'll see how it goes.

 

Really happy with how it turned out.  In a very hot overnight (260 ish) for 15 minthen in at 160 for 35 min.  Rested for just over 30 min. It was a good rare to medium. 

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I love Sunday roast. We do it almost every weekend. I think my 4 year old son loves it too. Half for the delicious food and half because it's one of the few times we all get to eat a nice hearty dinner together in the week. 

 

Whatever meat we have though he makes me serve it with Yorkshire pudding. To be honest, the only thing that ever really changes is the meat, the veg bit is almost always the same. 

 

Always empty plates at the end. 

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Have it most weeks, usually with my mum and dad or in law's. On the rare occasion we're at home I do it for the 5 of us.

 

Today's wasn't very good because it was a severely overcooked piece of gammon, drier than the Gobi desert.

 

I tend to use a thermometer for all joints, it's immensely more accurate and predictable than timing.

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20 hours ago, JohnnyNolan said:

Sadly no. I love a roast dinner, but since there are just the two of us it feels like it's worth doing. 

 

Only two of us in our house as well, but it doesn't stop us doing a full roast when we want it. Just means more lovely, lovely leftovers.

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This pork roast is from Neil Rankin's Low & Slow: How to Cook Meat book, which is brilliant. Sounds odd in that you need to start it at least the day prior, and possibly put it in the freezer for a bit at one point, but it was really great although I may have had to cook it slightly longer than suggested to get it up to temp in the second part.

 

Ingredients

1.5kg boned and rolled loin
Roast seasonal veg to serve
Salt to season

Directions

Start this recipe the day before you want to eat it. If this were for me, I’d knock a few minutes off these timings, but I don’t want to get into trouble, so this recipe cooks the pork loin to medium. The big difference here is that loin can’t be cooked as far as belly, so you have to reduce the end roasting time. But you add an extra low oven drying time, so the crackling cooks faster.

Put the joint in a pan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and leave to cool in the water for 15 minutes. The pork should reach an internal temperature of around 55°C.

Place the pan in the sink under running cold water. When the pork has cooled down, so it can be handled, lift it out and dry with a tea towel. Salt the skin, then leave in the fridge overnight, uncovered, to dry slightly and chill.

Set your oven to 140°C. Cook the loin from fridge-cold for 40 minutes. On a probe thermometer it should read no more than 60°C internally.

Remove the pork from the oven. Cool slightly, then leave it in the freezer for two to three hours, or overnight in the fridge, to chill completely.

Set your oven to 220°C. Roast the pork from fridge-cold for 30 minutes, placing the meat on a rack with a tray to catch any fat underneath. The skin should puff up like a balloon. If it goes too dark, pull the pork out and turn down the temperature, then put it back in. The final internal temperature should be no higher than 63°C – if it’s lower, don’t worry as the core temp has already been reached during the previous cooking stages. Serve with seasonal veg.

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Another recommendation for roasts, for some of the more shapeless cuts get it tied up into a good shape to allow more even cooking. This guy shows the best way to do the knots, takes a little while to get the hang of it but then you'll never look back. 

 

 

Actually his channel is kind of addictive, some of the stuff he does is quite impressive and in general most of the "normal" stuff is easy to follow and do yourself. It was from looking to do my own rolled turkey crown that I saw a video of him explaining how to debone an entire turkey, so I ended up doing that instead :ph34r: 

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Love a sunday lunch. 

 

Get yourselves a copy of Leith's meat bible, it's my second favourite cookbook and basically tells you how to cook any meat. It's brilliant.

 

 

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How do you shred it? Just with a knife? I want to get into finding more imaginative uses for leftover meats, making more than one meal out of cooked joints, and that sort of thing. I use leftover chicken for risottos and stir fries and have turned leftover roast beef into crispy shredded beef. Turning pork into chilli is a new one on me but it sounds good. 

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1 hour ago, Anne Summers said:

How do you shred it? Just with a knife? I want to get into finding more imaginative uses for leftover meats, making more than one meal out of cooked joints, and that sort of thing. I use leftover chicken for risottos and stir fries and have turned leftover roast beef into crispy shredded beef. Turning pork into chilli is a new one on me but it sounds good. 

 

Just like you would pulled pork... The shoulder will very tender so you'll just need a couple of forks.

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Yeah, two forks. 

 

22 hours ago, Anne Summers said:

How do you shred it? Just with a knife? I want to get into finding more imaginative uses for leftover meats, making more than one meal out of cooked joints, and that sort of thing. I use leftover chicken for risottos and stir fries and have turned leftover roast beef into crispy shredded beef. Turning pork into chilli is a new one on me but it sounds good. 

 

Well the beef we had on Sunday made two further meals. French dips on Monday and a stir fry on Wednesday. 

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So after just over 3hrs at 150 this is the pork:

 

IMG_2177.thumb.JPG.5aaeb4173acdb8c84d04adee660160a3.JPG

 

the skin comes off and goes on a rack above the roast potatoes and parsnips.

 

the fat is discarded. 

 

The meat is wrapped in foil and left to rest while I make gravy and finish everything else. 

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Forgot pics but had lamb shoulder yesterday, rub with garlic, rosemary, season and oil, marinate overnight, 20 minutes in the top oven then cover with foil, chuck in a splosh of wine and 7 hours in bottom oven. 

Can be pulled apart with forks rather than carved, was delicious. 

 

@The Hierophant 

try doing the pork without the skin and fat on, for longer at lower temp - just cut all the shite off first, then maybe give it a rub and leave overnight, give it a very quick sear then cook it covered for 5 hours or so at 120ish.

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On 04/03/2017 at 17:15, The Hierophant said:

Yeah, two forks. 

 

 

Well the beef we had on Sunday made two further meals. French dips on Monday and a stir fry on Wednesday. 

 

Loving all these pictures so far. Really inspiring me to make more of an effort with roasted joints of meat as I normally just do chickens.

 

However, and I don't want to derail things, but I'd love to get more info on the French Dips you've been making.

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On 15 March 2017 at 15:34, Andy_Why said:

 

Loving all these pictures so far. Really inspiring me to make more of an effort with roasted joints of meat as I normally just do chickens.

 

We have a chicken for today but we are going out for most of the day so don't know if we will get chance to cook it today or have it tomorrow. 

 

On 15 March 2017 at 15:34, Andy_Why said:

However, and I don't want to derail things, but I'd love to get more info on the French Dips you've been making.

 

I basically always make tonnes of gravy, the next day I heat it up, slice some more beef very thinly and fill a baguette with the beef and some horseradish. Simple. 

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