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David Heath

I want all the Roald Dahl books from the same series

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Started collected the Roald Dahl books, didn't I.

 

Wanted to get them all from the same series, didn't I.

 

Except some croc-breathed rumphead changed all the designs when I wasn't done.

 

Can anyone help me complete the collection I've started? The ones I have are like in the picture. They're similar to the ones you can find all over the place now, but the lettering on the spine is different and the illustration on the cover is different and a whole bunch of other stuff is different too. I will purchase ones you have and don't want anymore. I will purchase ones you find out and about. I have listed the ones I have below so I can keep a list. But I would like them in good condition please.

 

Also, I don't want the ones you can still find which are multiple stories in one, I want all the stories as separate books.

 

roalddahl.jpg

 

Here's what I have.

 

The Witches

Danny The Champion of the World

The BFG

George's Marvellous Medicine

The Twits

The Magic Finger

Esio Trot

The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me

 

If anyone can help I will cook a delicious pea soup and we can all get together and eat it.

 

Thanks all!

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I think that might be a better plan.

 

That's the newer series, so the books won't match mine, but I can take the ones I've bought down to the local Oxfam thing instead.

 

OK, new topic idea, what's your favourite Roald Dahl book?

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We have a box set that matches the books in your first post, and a couple of additional books with the same design. I think it covers all of Dahl's kids' books, so it might be worth checking Amazon for the earlier set - probably still a cheap enough option. I can't remember what the additional books are, but I'll have a look at home.

 

My favourite might be George's Marvellous Medicine, not least because it's short. I've gone right off Dahl since reading them aloud to my daughter, I think he's a real drag to read out in most cases (GMM is one exception). He does a lot of back-and-forth dialogue, which is annoying to read out, and just generally wears your tongue out, it's like swimming with your clothes on or something. I really didn't like reading out The Witches, and I hated Glass Elevator with a passion. I still did it though, because I'm a professional.

 

So my revised opinion is that he's a very good author to read in your head (which is why he often takes a conspiratory tone with the reader), but less enjoyable when reading aloud.

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That's a bad case of sun-bleaching you've got on those Pratchetts. :hmm:

 

I can't be of much help with getting a matching collection, since my copies are a mishmash of editions from over the decades. And in this case I wouldn't want to have them all identical! As great as Quentin Blake is (get this book while you're at it!), in certain books where I grew up with different illustrators, I have trouble imagining his illustrations fitting as well:

 

duRZnGS.jpg

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That's a great point, though in the case of Danny, Blake's illustrations aren't vastly different - nowhere near as cartoony as The Witches or The Twits, for example (both of which are perfect fits for Blake). But when I was reading Danny recently, it was the version Nick posted above that was in my head, and it does inform your experience of the story.

 

Blake has been tragically sullied in my mind (which I appreciate is a problem localised entirely in my skull) by his work on David Walliams' books. I don't get on with those at all, so I'd rather they were illustrated by someone I dislike, such as Katie Hopkins or the comedian Jethro.

 

But Blake is great, of course - his own books, like Mr Magnolia or the Mrs Armitage series, are excellent choices for younger readers.

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21 hours ago, David Heath said:

I think that might be a better plan.

 

That's the newer series, so the books won't match mine, but I can take the ones I've bought down to the local Oxfam thing instead.

 

OK, new topic idea, what's your favourite Roald Dahl book?

 

the enormous crocodile

 

I make no apologies for this.

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3 hours ago, Rowan Morrison said:

Blake has been tragically sullied in my mind (which I appreciate is a problem localised entirely in my skull) by his work on David Walliams' books. I don't get on with those at all, so I'd rather they were illustrated by someone I dislike, such as Katie Hopkins or the comedian Jethro.

:lol:

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Whilst his fiction is great, as a child I preferred the autobiographies Boy and Going Solo. I think this is because the subject matter in both is fascinating (especially his WW2 experiences in Going Solo), but it was hard to find first hand accounts of the era which was accessible to a child. Because of the writing style and the childlike perspective, I always found these books really easy to get into and incredibly accessible in a way which did not take away from the sometimes dark content.

 

Of the fiction, I would go with Fantastic Mr Fox.

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On 2/8/2017 at 21:34, Nick R said:

duRZnGS.jpg

 

That's the version we read in class at school, think that's my favourite Roald Dahl book.  Always found it frustrating reading books that the whole class were doing, you were all supposed to read at the same pace, I always read ahead.

 

My eldest niece had Going Solo from the library, I read the first couple of pages as their bedtime story, the youngest told me not to as it was sooo boring.  It seemed quite interesting.

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When I had a bad mushroom trip, aged about 17, I re-told the story of Fantastic Mr Fox in my head, to keep me from worrying about the shadows in the woods. 

 

It's still my favourite.

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I read Esio Trot for the first time last year.

 

It's essentially the story of a man who spends his life staring down his neighbour's blouse, before tricking her into marrying him.

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On 2/11/2017 at 14:49, David Heath said:

I read Esio Trot for the first time last year.

 

It's essentially the story of a man who spends his life staring down his neighbour's blouse, before tricking her into marrying him.

 

Recently adapted for the cinema as Passengers.

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I've just read Charlie and The Chocolate Factory to my 4-year-old son and we both really enjoyed it. The BFG was dismissed as 'boring' at around halfway mark, whereas I remember loving it when I was a kid. Danny The Champion of the World is the one I remember most vividly. I was probably a bit older when I read it.

 

We went straight onto Elevator, which I remember nothing about, and I immediately get the feeling it's not going to be anywhere near as good.

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The Minus Land section of Great Glass Elevator terrified me as a kid. Particularly one of the illustrations:

 

Spoiler

zPKUWXQ.png

 

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The Great Glass Elevator was pretty disappointing. Had the feeling of a typical half-arsed sequel, probably my least favourite Dahl book along with The Twits.

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George's Marvelous Medicine was always my favourite, it's just a great story, though there's a lot of quality stories. Been through most with the kids a few times and have a load on audiobook for the car. I'd say coming back to them as an adult - Matilda is an overlooked gem.

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I'm about 40 pages into Elevator now and it's bloody hard going. I'm sure my son doesn't have a clue what's going on either.

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1 hour ago, Pob said:

I'm about 40 pages into Elevator now and it's bloody hard going. I'm sure my son doesn't have a clue what's going on either.

 

As I recall that's the worst Dahl for long back-and-forth, dialogue-only conversations, which are hard to follow when someone's reading them out (and a real delight if you've decided to establish accents earlier in the book). Probably the most dated book, too - it's hard to view it as much more than a non-specific parody of 70s politics. The part where the grandparents get younger is good fun, but the rest of it I found a chore.

 

I think the criticism of The BFG as 'boring' is justifiable too, on the grounds that very little actually happens - it's 90% explanations and 10% farting, which is a disappointing balance.

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It's also massively racist. I had indeed established accents but couldn't bring myself to do the funny talky Chinese characters, complete with phonetic mispronounciations or r's and l's. 

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2 hours ago, Pob said:

It's also massively racist. I had indeed established accents but couldn't bring myself to do the funny talky Chinese characters, complete with phonetic mispronounciations or r's and l's. 

 

Oh lord, I'd forgotten about that but you're quite right. See also Dahl's Revolting Rhymes, where Cinderella is called a slut - something else I glossed over while reading, like a coward. I think it's been changed to mutt now, which I think is the wrong thing to do in principle, but perhaps not quite so wrong in practice.

 

My 'favourite' Dahl anecdote is the holiday where we'd just finished reading The Witches and ended up in a restaurant sitting near a woman without any hair, presumably from chemo, leading our daughter to point out that there might be a witch at the next table. I guarantee Roald was having a nasty chuckle at that from his ratty old armchair in Hell, which is where he almost certainly ended up.

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I love the ending of The Witches. It is just so dark but touching that this boy will have a short life as a mouse, but that he does not mind as it means that he will not have to live without his grandmother. Absolutely terrifying stuff, but it is nice to see a kids' book where premature mortality is just treated as something that happens rather than a taboo subject.

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8 minutes ago, BossSaru said:

I love the ending of The Witches. It is just so dark but touching that this boy will have a short life as a mouse, but that he does not mind as it means that he will not have to live without his grandmother. Absolutely terrifying stuff, but it is nice to see a kids' book where premature mortality is just treated as something that happens rather than a taboo subject.

 

Probably best to steer away from the film, then.

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On 2/14/2017 at 08:40, Fierce Poodle said:

, probably my least favourite Dahl book along with The Twits.

 

You take that back. I love The Twits! :P You better watch out or you might end up getting the Shrinks! 

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'Edition'

 

The Twits is fantastic. I watched the Witches movie with my sister's kids recently, they were surprisingly okay with it. The practical effects are fantastic.

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On 09/02/2017 at 15:11, BossSaru said:

 

 

Of the fiction, I would go with Fantastic Mr Fox.

 

This was the first book I ever read. I love it.

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On ‎15‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 11:27, Rowan Morrison said:

 

Probably best to steer away from the film, then.

 

Didn't they change the ending after Roald Dahl had a huge moan about it?

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On 05/10/2017 at 13:36, gossi the dog said:

 

Didn't they change the ending after Roald Dahl had a huge moan about it?

 

No idea, but if they did I doubt they managed to pacify him - the kids both get turned back to humans by a good witch. Wikipedia says that Dahl described the film as "utterly appalling" because of the ending, but in fairness the sour-faced old bastard almost certainly considered everything appalling to some degree.

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7 minutes ago, Rowan Morrison said:

 

No idea, but if they did I doubt they managed to pacify him - the kids both get turned back to humans by a good witch. Wikipedia says that Dahl described the film as "utterly appalling" because of the ending, but in fairness the sour-faced old bastard almost certainly considered everything appalling to some degree.

 

You make him sound like Victor Meldrew

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On 10/02/2017 at 13:18, Danster said:

When I had a bad mushroom trip, aged about 17, I re-told the story of Fantastic Mr Fox in my head, to keep me from worrying about the shadows in the woods. 

 

It's still my favourite.

I'm trying that next time my psychedelic experiences get too much. 

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