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Top 10:- Scariest Scenes from Horror Movies


Sleeping Lion
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https://youtu.be/PEi7VX5KAUI

 

Horror comes in various forms, what I may find scary others might find it boring. The scares are even more intensified when watched at four in the morning every morning, with the lights off in the whole house and the factor of fright being the highest it can get. This is what I got down to out of the 29 movies I saw leading up to Halloween. 

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10 minutes ago, Scribblor said:

Picked any part of American Werewolf in London as an example of one of the scariest scenes. Your argument is invalid.

 

I mean, it's a great film, but it's not remotely scary. 

 

Not even any of the dream sequences?

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Nope. Mind you, that list has Coraline high up in it (which, again, is good but IMO not scary unless you're seven), and the absolutely appalling Exorcism of Emily Rose in it too. So I suspect the OP is scared by different things to me. There were a few good choices, but overall it didn't do anything for me in terms of scary scenes.

 

Also, the video's editing is really bad, and  undercuts much of the scariness of the scenes.

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I don't. I don't have any video editing software and I don't own most of the films I'd choose. 

 

I'm on the way home at the moment, on the train. If I get chance once I'm at home and the kids are in bed, I'll put a list together. 

 

What we find scary is an interesting question though, thinking about it. I've never found The Exorcist scary, but that's on the OP's list so they obviously do.

 

I think it's worth considering why I don't find it scary. It was clearly terrifying when it came out, as evidenced by the stories of people fainting en masse. But when I saw it in 1996, I found it a bit silly. Is that because the effects are so dated? Is it because it had been built up so much? Is it because it's so heavily based around Christian mythology and as a non-believer I don't buy into any of that? 

 

Most of the films I'd put on my list will be more inexplicable than the binary good/evil split of God and the devil (though there'll be evil there, of course). And I'm pretty sure that a fair amount of people will think at least a few of my choices aren't scary.

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Definitely. Jump scares don't do much for me. They make me jump as often as not, but that's surprise, not fear. I tend to find them a rather lazy 'scare'. Building dread, nameless threat and inexplicable, unknowable menace are my preferred type of horror.

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I don't think The Exorcist is a film for people who want to be scared, it's more for people who are already scared. I'm thinking Scribblor might have Mulholland Drive somewhere in there, the perfect fusion of building dread and jump scare.

 

'Factor of fright' is great, by the way, that was worth any number of bumbling shill posts.

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22 minutes ago, Rowan Morrison said:

I don't think The Exorcist is a film for people who want to be scared, it's more for people who are already scared. I'm thinking Scribblor might have Mulholland Drive somewhere in there, the perfect fusion of building dread and jump scare.

 

Oh my, yes. Also Don't Look Now, The Shining, The Witch, The Babadook, Picnic at Hanging Rock (my own personal favourite which no-one else even agrees is a horror film) and a few others. Choosing a single scene from any of those is incredibly difficult though because they all depend on the context.

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4 hours ago, Scribblor said:

I think it's worth considering why I don't find it scary. It was clearly terrifying when it came out, as evidenced by the stories of people fainting en masse. But when I saw it in 1996, I found it a bit silly. Is that because the effects are so dated? Is it because it had been built up so much? Is it because it's so heavily based around Christian mythology and as a non-believer I don't buy into any of that?

 

I feel somewhat similarly about The Exorcist. I think it's a tremendously well-made film, of course, but I also do think the effects hold up fine (as long as you watch a version without that bloody Spider Walk). I just don't find the subject matter to be inherently horrifying, and the film leans heavily on the built-in seriousness of that aspect rather than relying on more 'scary movie' tactics. To me its story is as much a fantasy as the Elm Street series, but it's so well crafted that ironically I just appreciate it more as a drama.

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It really irritates me when you have jump scares that are contrived by someone jumping in from outside the camera frame, when they would have been fully visible to the people in the scene.

 

cf. helicopters that are apparently completely silent until entering the field of view of the camera.

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21 hours ago, Scribblor said:

Oh my, yes. Also Don't Look Now, The Shining, The Witch, The Babadook, Picnic at Hanging Rock (my own personal favourite which no-one else even agrees is a horror film) and a few others. Choosing a single scene from any of those is incredibly difficult though because they all depend on the context.

The Shining is my favourite horror movie of all time, but for some reason I felt the Witch, and  Babadook were somewhat disappointing, and lacking. Though if you enjoyed those films, you may like Under the Shadow.

 

Also Picnic at Hanging Rock is just haunting and really underrated.

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If you suspend your disbelief (films do ask us to do that very often - just look at GOTG and it's diminutive Racoon with a penchant for heavy weaponry and a talking tree), The Exorcist is scary. A successful, assertive and upwardly mobile woman suddenly has to experience something incredibly distressing that she can't control, doesn't understand and, worse still, it's happening to her daughter - the only person she seems to love in the film. She has to rely, after trying and exhausting science, upon a non-scientific means to regain control and save her daughter and she does so reluctantly and almost shamefully. If you look at it in terms of mental health rather than demonic possession, it's still a harrowing situation to be in. It's a very deep film in many respects.

The Exorcist doesn't make you shit your pants when you watch it but it shits in your head long after you've seen it.

The last film that truly scared me was Shooting Dogs and it isn't a horror film. It's highly unlikely to happen where I live however, it can and does happen in the World where I live and the sudden, instant viciousness within the human condition is horrible to think about - the total breakdown of society is frightening to me. 

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Films don't scare me. They may make me jump occasionally when they purposefully try to, but as @Scribblor most excellently pointed out, those are sudden shocks, not actual scares. I think it's because I'm quite rational and my brain is constantly reminding me that I'm watching a film, it's not real and therefore I shouldn't be scared. 

 

The only film to ever scare me was, in fact, American werewolf in London. I watched it when i was six. The noise of the beast howling in the moors near the start and the dream sequences were so scary I had to turn it off and it was years later before I finally got round to watching it in full (not due to not wanting to, but more not having the opportunity to) and I loved it and realised that no, it isn't actually scary in the slightest. 

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On 01/11/2016 at 23:55, Sabreman said:

 

I feel somewhat similarly about The Exorcist. I think it's a tremendously well-made film, of course, but I also do think the effects hold up fine (as long as you watch a version without that bloody Spider Walk). I just don't find the subject matter to be inherently horrifying, and the film leans heavily on the built-in seriousness of that aspect rather than relying on more 'scary movie' tactics. To me its story is as much a fantasy as the Elm Street series, but it's so well crafted that ironically I just appreciate it more as a drama.

 

I remember when I  was child about 11 or 12 and my cousin got a copy of the Exorcist, we  were so excited but we found it quite boring. 

 

To be fair I'd been allowed to watch pretty much any movie as a child so my this point I'd seen all the classics.

 

It was only when I watched a different cut as an adult which had a scene when which had a horrific medical procedure in it. Maybe it wad trapanning. It was fucking horrible. 

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