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Early Childhood, did you or any friends own BOTH consoles?


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5 hours ago, SMD said:

Check out the rich families in here. The major reason i never had more than one console till I was old enough to earn my own money was I had to sell the old one to get the new one.

 

Obviously i wish i didn't now but we had to make ends meet. Only one of my mates I knew who had both the master system and NES was cos they were moving up Sudan and apparently they didn't have video games there so that was his lot. 

 

The Spectrum I had was jointly mine and my brother's.  When I wanted a C64 I had to save up pocket money and my mum put some towards it.  It was a secondhand one we bought from my cousin.  

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In the 80s my family had an Acorn Electron. My mate had a C64. I don't know if it's typical, but I knew a bunch of people with Electrons and C64's, but never got to see a Spectrum in action even once. Therefore I have no retro love for the Spectrum, I just think Spectrum games look shit.

 

Around 1990 or 1991, me and my mate both got an Amiga 500. That was my machine for the next few years - I personally didn't see much of consoles. Most school friends had an Amiga or Atari ST. I knew the SNES and Mega Drive were around and they both looked cool, but I rarely had chance to play on them. Finally around 1995 I had a mate with a SNES so I played a lot of Mario Kart and stuff.

 

Going into 1996/97 (A-level college years), my mate had bought himself a Saturn so I got a Playstation -- that way we'd see what both platforms had to offer. When the Saturn was clearly dying I sold him my Playstation, while I chose to see what N64 was all about.

 

Perhaps the first time I had "both consoles at once" was when I had a Playstation 2 and then also got an Xbox, although it feels more like I progressed from one to the other.

 

I loved that first Xbox so much that I jumped right into Xbox 360 and never got a PS3 at all. I'm not sure if it was brand loyalty, or just a lifetime mentality that it's excessive to have both at once.

 

This is now the first time I truly have "both" consoles -- a PS4 and Xbone. To be fair it's the PS4 that gets a bigger workout -- I'll buy games by default for the PS4 on the expectation that they'll run better. I needed the Xbone to import my song library for Rock Band 4, and I'll also use it for Xbox exclusives like Forza games.

 

And what about PC? I've always played and worked on PCs... but always hated PC gaming. I've always had a PC that's a generation behind, so I just play retro and indie stuff on PC.

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I can only think of one childhood friend who had a master system. All my other friends had the usual 8 bit computers, then moved on to the Amiga and ST. It wasn't a money thing either, as I went to school with very well off kids. I expect the variety of game types available on computers was a factor, and piracy played a big part too as there was an abundance of riches available. 

 

Later, when I went to university there were a couple of people with consoles, so Mortal Kombat and SF2 sessions were big social events. 

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50 minutes ago, Oh Danny Boy said:

This thread makes me feel young. These days I feel old having been in primary education when the Saturn and PlayStation came out. 

My boys (10 and 12) make me feel old when they mock the games of my past. I remember swapping ZX81 tapes in the playground, and I was 10 then. 

 

Getting a new game used to be much more of an event though. You would get a game and it would be your only new one for ages. My lads have a 360 at their house (I'm divorced) with a huge library on there of stuff I bought, and my PS3 when they are here full of stuff. Plus a PSP with tons of GBA/GBASP/SNES stuff on it, and access to my Steam collection (which isn't huge). When I got LTTP is was my big purchase for a few months and was virtually all I played. In a way, it's a shame this isn't the same for them

 

EDIT : Though saying that, they look forward for months to a new Pokemon release, or Lego game release and play them to death, so I suppose it's not too different

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I remember a short time when our local Comet had a display where you could play Street Fighter 2 on the SNES. We all treated it like a free arcade and usually got a good hour in before a staff member would come along and say "OUT."

 

 

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My boys (10 and 12) make me feel old when they mock the games of my past. I remember swapping ZX81 tapes in the playground, and I was 10 then. 

 

Getting a new game used to be much more of an event though. You would get a game and it would be your only new one for ages. My lads have a 360 at their house (I'm divorced) with a huge library on there of stuff I bought, and my PS3 when they are here full of stuff. Plus a PSP with tons of GBA/GBASP/SNES stuff on it, and access to my Steam collection (which isn't huge). When I got LTTP is was my big purchase for a few months and was virtually all I played. In a way, it's a shame this isn't the same for them

 

EDIT : Though saying that, they look forward for months to a new Pokemon release, or Lego game release and play them to death, so I suppose it's not too different



I think a big difference now is that you can amass a huge digital library relatively cheaply, so the number of games quickly stacks up.

When we were kids, not only would you save all your pennies to go buy a game, you hoped the shop(s) had it in, traipsed around, handed over your cash and rushed home to play the hell out of it.

I have some really vivid memories of buying some games in shops that don't exist anymore, sometimes in parts of town that don't even exist anymore. We had a games shop called The Games Room in Epsom that was in the indoor market place (gone), then moved outside. Used to buy nearly all my stuff there. Never forget bringing FF7 home, all £44.99's worth.


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There was the one kid in school who's family could afford an Atari 2600 and a couple of games. 

 

In the 80's when home computers became a big thing people tended have either a Speccy 48 or a C64, but not both.

 

Never knew of anyone who had a NES or Master System. The  Megadrive was the first console I remember having widespread success. I'd left school by the time that came out, so wasn't even in childhood never mind early childhood.

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Master system and nes seemed less popular, everyone had either a snes or megadrive though. Maybe I was too young as I was barely out of nappies during the hey day of both systems, I do remember my uncle having a nes though. Myself and a friend had a master system 2, mine had a built in sonic and he had Alex Kidd, my neighbour after playing mine got herself one too. This would have been the early 90's and despite enjoying it I could never escape the fact that the master system 2 was the poor boys megadrive.

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Before my parents split up we only had one system, we went from an Speccy to a BBC Micro to an Atari and then NES. My dad liked games so when they split up we got a Mega Drive at his and a SNES at home.

 

By the time PlayStation, Saturn and N64 were out I had a part time job whilst studying so could have all three. 

 

I did have a friend whom had a Neo Geo and a PC Engine, I was so jealous of that guy.

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If you were born in 97, you'd be old enough to be in university and legally drink alcohol, and the ps2/xbox/gamecube would have been out when you were about 4 years old.

 

Both consoles! Early Childhood!

 

(also no, we had an amiga 1200 from 1991/2 til probably 98 with the exception of my game boy)

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We had an Amiga at home, but were lucky enough to live near a store that rented consoles (including imports) so many a weekend my brother and I would chip in and spend unhealthy amounts of time with Snes's and Megadives from all regions. Also, neogeo, PC Engine (so slick and tiny at the time), even the PC Engine GT which fucking blew my mind back in the early 90's. Quite lucky really.

 

Ali at ALG Video in Wandsworth, I still dunno if your geeky passion for import games rubbing off on me was a good thing or not...

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Actually, because of the timing of going to Uni, I didn't touch a console until the late 90s - except for hand-helds like the Lynx and original Game Boy plus early Binatone Pong/sports games and the Atari 2600 in the 70s/80s.

I did a science degree, so everyone had had computers (Apple IIs, Beeb Bs, speccys and the like), and moved on to ST/Amigas after I left. I got a PC through work and did a lot of PC gaming in the 90s.

So the first home console I owned was the PS1, bought late in its life; completely missed the classic NES/SNES/Megadrive era. But console gaming didn't really take off for me until I bought a DC.

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I was born in 1979, so have been aware of pretty much all the console/computer "generations" in the UK, although I didn't properly own my own Videogames machine till about 1993, that being the Super Nintendo. I was more interested in comics and cartoons as a child. 

 

My family thought it worthwhile to own a computer though, and like most families in the mid-eighties, we owned a ZX Spectrum. It was cheaper than the Commodore 64 and the software was plentiful, and here's where I got my first taste for "computer games" playing weird, odd-ball stuff on our Spectrum. Also worth pointing out that the ZX Spectrum was rife amongst my primary school pals. I only really knew of one other kid who had a Commodore. 

 

Moving onto the late 80's, my parents bought an Atari ST and that was very unique. I didn't know of any other kids that had an Atari ST, so no game swaps happening! That time period from the late 80's into the very early 90's was dominated by people owning either a Sega Megadrive or an Amiga. Some people even had both! 

 

The point to all this, is to reflect on the fact that the NES wasn't a thing in the UK at all. No kid had one, at least that I knew of and the whole of that decade seemed dominated by the Spectrum and the Amiga. I then moved to the US for a while around 1990 and it was a whole different thing. Nintendo dominated everything and their IP was all over the place. Mario and Zelda cartoons! Heavy toy focused advertisement on the NES. In contrast, the computers available in the UK seemed marketed towards nerdy bedroom dwelling dungeon-masters. 

 

On moving back to the UK about a year later, I knew the upcoming Super Nintendo was what I desperately wanted. It all seemed so much more fun, colourful and vibrant. Guess that prolonged trip to the US fucked me for life as a full on Videogame enthusiast. 

 

Dunno what this ramble was about! I guess owning "both consoles" wasn't hugely a thing back in the day in the UK at least until post 16 bit gen. The Nintendo Sega battle was more closely fought over in the US where as here people had Megadrives or Amigas. I stuck with the Super Nintendo, but only a couple other kids I knew also owned it. 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Gizamaluke said:

We had an Amiga at home, but were lucky enough to live near a store that rented consoles (including imports) so many a weekend my brother and I would chip in and spend unhealthy amounts of time with Snes's and Megadives from all regions. Also, neogeo, PC Engine (so slick and tiny at the time), even the PC Engine GT which fucking blew my mind back in the early 90's. Quite lucky really.

 

Ali at ALG Video in Wandsworth, I still dunno if your geeky passion for import games rubbing off on me was a good thing or not...

 

Where in Wandsworth was that?

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Consoles! Pah!, computers first

 

Although a lot of people we knew had Atari's, they never really held much interest. 

 

My best mate got a Spectrum 16k first, and it wasn't until months later "Manic Miner" burst onto the screen and the speakers, I knew I had to try and persuade my dad to jump in too.

 

For Xmas one year, it became a reality. It was bloody expensive, but I think my parents could see this thing had legs. 

 

Near the end of the generation, we bought a C64 second hand. Then an Atari ST (an easy to understand system, but doomed from the start, MIDI saved it), and then an Amiga. And then it all went out of style for a bit. 

 

I remember reading about Super Mario World when it appeared on the Japanese SNES. At first it seemed a real backwards step from computer games. Why go back to cartridges, like the Atari before it? Why spend about £50+ on a single game? Seemed madness, until you played it.

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I'm not sure I follow this thread. I mean, there was plenty of crossover between computers of the same gen in my house in the same "period"

 

I got an Amiga when I already an Atari ST for example but two consoles from the same gen? Nah, not as far as I remember.

 

my mate Will on the other hand. Well, his dad had a videogame shop, so... Yeah.

 

He even had an Atari 8-bit machine 65XE, iirc Superior in every way, including cost.

 

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I would have had most of the 8-bit machines, if not for my mum stealing whatever I had had the longest to take back for my step-dad. "You don't need this now, you've got your new one! Let Tony have it." kind of thing. Tony was sound so I didn't mind, plus he'd practice games properly and not hold back when it came to vs. It'd be good fun watching him gradually become more and more capable at games I'd long mastered.

 

I had a SNES, followed the year after by a Megadrive. One of my friends had a Mega CD and wanted to trade me for my SNES. I thought long and hard about it and decided to make the switch as the Mega CD always seemed pretty niche to me, and I was unsure I'd get another chance at playing the handful of games I was interested in. I'm glad I did it in the end as I got to play Sonic CD, Snatcher, Final Fight CD, etc. I've not owned a Megadrive since, so it was definitely the right move. It only took me about a month to save up for a second-hand SNES an all... So I had the SNES, Megadrive + MegaCD.

 

Luckily we also had a game rental shop in town that did imports (In Burnley of all places!!). I never had to buy games really, there was no point.

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6 hours ago, SeanR said:

I'm not sure I follow this thread.

 

 

I think it's been made over complicated by bringing in various other machines, originally the main two way competitions were nes vs master system and snes vs megadrive. Just saying that growing up, nobody I knew ever had both. Where as today, lots of people have both PS and Xbox. I don't think there is a super amazing answer to this, it's just that in the past the parents mostly never had their own game machine and didn't understand them so wouldn't consider buying their children 2 of the 'same toys' etc.

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Pretty much what capwn said - plus they were relatively more expensive, and in a time when kid's toys were much cheaper and consumer electronics were a novelty. And console games were expensive - ask anyone who splashed out on an import, back in the day.

You generally had 'a' computer or 'a' console. If you were lucky, you had a mate with the same one so you could swap games (computers were better in the 8-bit days because you could swap tapes full of games).

Against the rise of two-console ownership, is the fall of the console wars; while each console has it's fanboys, you see fewer all out flame wars, and nothing on the scale of the 8-bit playground wars.

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