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Nintendo NES Classic Edition - High Score Sheet in OP


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45 minutes ago, mushashi said:

By the same token, British people who didn't know any better would be forgiven for thinking that Nintendo enjoyed the same sort of popularity that Commodore or Sinclair or even SEGA did in this country in the 1980s and 1990s, they were always the runner-up until the Gameboy and Wii/DS eras. We are not America or Japan, our history is significantly divergent with theirs.

 

The '90s? By about '92 the only way I could get C64 games was on the front of Commodore Format and by '95 the best I could scrounge up for my A500 was a dusty copy of Super Thunder Blade at Beatties. And the C64 was a superstar compared to the Sinclair as far as the Menzies tapes section was concerned. Regardless of who was in the lead, for anyone who got into gaming from 1990 onwards it was all about Sega and Nintendo.

 

If you were already a teenager in the early '80s, in the era when Sinclair and Commodore were on the uptick, it's probably tempting to imagine that they continued to be a dominant force in gaming, but they were on their way out by the time the Berlin wall fell.

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This is getting off track. To condense it down to a single point:

 

Regardless of its stature in the rest of the world, NES was a major part of the UK's gaming culture when it was on sale. The mini-NES will not be some baffling gamer curio when it comes out here.

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23 minutes ago, gossi the dog said:

 

I'm with you on this. I'd probably play it for a couple hours. Be overwhelmed by the number of games, so play each one for a few minutes. Then get annoyed at the difficulty and the lack of saves and never play it again. The pads do look great though, so I've pre-ordered one of them.

 

It has multiple save states.

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9 hours ago, Lorfarius said:

Will the mini-NES be able to connect to the internet?

 

No. The console is a standalone device, so it cannot connect to the internet or any external storage devices. The game lineup was chosen to provide a diverse mix of popular and recognisable NES games that appeal to a wide variety of players. Everyone should be able to find multiple games to enjoy.

 

On the same note: does Nintendo plan to sell other NES games for the mini-NES beyond the 30 it comes preloaded with?

 

No. The console is a standalone device, so it cannot connect to the internet or any external storage devices. The 30 games included with the system were chosen to provide a wide variety of top-quality, long-lasting game-play experiences.

 

Are there plans for other mini-consoles, like a mini-SNES or mini-N64?

 

We have nothing to announce at this time.

 

Just because people have been asking: safe to say it can’t play old cartridges, right? (Based on the image it looks like an NES cartridge would have around the same width as the entire console.) Does it open up at all?

 

The console does not use physical media and therefore the Chamber Lid does not open.

 

so+you're+telling+me+there's+a

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I was kinda lucky, in that my parents were poor but my friends were spoilt. They all had Nintendos, or at least 3 of them did. This would've been the very late 80's/early 90's. Oddly I didn't know anyone with a Sega until I managed to nag my parents into getting me a Master System II, from Boots. I still have more nostalgia for the Nintendo though, since I actually got to play more games for it.

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I'm not sure about the internal market of the UK apart from one thing: it was Sega country.

 

Nintendo was the de facto video games console on the continent. But you guys were 'weird' for being so completely enamoured with Sega's hardware. The Master Systems didn't even register here and the Mega Drive was seen as 'contrarian'. Doubly so when a "Pepsi hedgehog" entered the fray. You only fell in line with the rest of Europe when the PlayStation was launched.

 

I guess Brexit was always meant to be. :(

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Yeah Sega were a much bigger deal.    It was mainly Amiga/ST and the tail end of the Speccy/C64/Amstrad around then.   NES didn't cause much of a ripple at all.

 

I remember quite clearly because we were developing NES titles which had virtually zero visibility in the UK.

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53 minutes ago, Alex W. said:

This is getting off track. To condense it down to a single point:

 

Regardless of its stature in the rest of the world, NES was a major part of the UK's gaming culture when it was on sale.

 

Except it wasn't.

 

I knew who Mario was thanks to McDonalds toys. I even played Mario 3 once, but I couldn't tell you the system it was running on. No one at school mentioned Nintendo/NES. Magazines were computer and SEGA.

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20 minutes ago, JPickford said:

 

It really wasn't.

 

exactly.. I knew of only one person who had one...  the master system was far more popular and then the megadrive came out and that really took over. the nes was that thing with the robo tin the games department at boots that you never knew what it actually did...

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As a Master System owner, the reason I think we loved it more than the NES was because of home computers. I had an Atari before the Master System and a PC at the same time, so that influence meant I always preferred the Master System's style and library to the NES. Also I loved Sonic and wasn't a big fan of Mario at the time.

There were people who had the NES but computers and Sega were far more popular. The Mega Drive was a phenomenon but then I was the only one who had a Saturn :lol:

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Obviously the console was available for sale, so some people had one.

 

I remember seeing it Boots and thinking it was shit compared to the Amiga (which is true graphically).   It was only after visiting Rare and getting a contract from them that I went out and bought one.   It was a revelation to me because although the graphics were poor and the controller was strange,  the better games were absolutely brilliant and pissed on most Amiga stuff which I considered state-of-the-art at the time.    And that strange controller was better than a joystick.

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I didn't know what a NES was other than a shit master system as a kid, I knew a couple of weird eyes that had one - C64/Amiga/Sega was the path.

 

Mind, when I was going to get a Megadrive for my birthday John Lewis had sold out but they did have the brand new Super Nintendo in stock - fuck that noise I said and waited to get me a Megadrive :doh:

 

I bought an NES once many years after it was dead, it barely worked and I had to clean the contacts all 3 times I used it - still want this mini NES!

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1 hour ago, Alex W. said:

 

The '90s? By about '92 the only way I could get C64 games was on the front of Commodore Format and by '95 the best I could scrounge up for my A500 was a dusty copy of Super Thunder Blade at Beatties. And the C64 was a superstar compared to the Sinclair as far as the Menzies tapes section was concerned. Regardless of who was in the lead, for anyone who got into gaming from 1990 onwards it was all about Sega and Nintendo.

 

If you were already a teenager in the early '80s, in the era when Sinclair and Commodore were on the uptick, it's probably tempting to imagine that they continued to be a dominant force in gaming, but they were on their way out by the time the Berlin wall fell.

 

My brother and I were introduced to the C64 quite late (the latter half of 1990 if I recall) and a large number of games came from magazine covermounts. (Credit to Commodore Format for continuing to go on for about five years and supplying all sorts of games and demos.) You could still find games to buy in Boots or John Menzies or whatever - or even those mail order companies - but I was the guy with the NES-owning best friend who I'd visit to play their games. Admittedly it wasn't long before we got a NES of our own, but that was probably a result of joining the C64 party at such a late period in the machine's life.

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1 hour ago, JPickford said:

NES was available in 86 at least.  Just nobody bought it.  I *think* only Boots sold them.

 

I bloody bought it Pickford! I bought it! They we available in lots more shops than just Boots down here.

 

1 hour ago, K said:

Trying to draw conclusions around a console’s popularity based on your own childhood experiences is never going to be a very scientific process. My experience from around 1990 - 91 was that NESs tended to be owned by really rich and/or spoiled kids, and were pretty rare – not quite at the Neo-Geo level of semi-mythical status, where there’d be one kid rumoured to have the mystery future-console who lived in some distant village like Colonel Kurtz, playing Super Sidekicks in a darkened room. But still pretty rare - £40 a game was crazy money when you were used to buying £1.99 tapes from Smiths.

 

It felt like a pretty short window where the NES was available in the UK as well, as it seemed to hit around 1990 and then was immediately overtaken by the Megadrive – the true people’s console, not like the SNES kids with their decadent mode 7 effects, weird dongles and foreign games. But that’s all totally subjective.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Camel said:

Is this really that exciting?  Did people go nuts for those Mega Drives with built-in games?  I'm not sure I get the appeal really.  I've pre-ordered one of those pads, mind, those looks lovely.

 

I'd pick one up. The difference is that this is done by Nintendo themselves. 

 

I always thought that these mini retro consoles were a good idea but they were only produced  by third parties and very cheaply, you'd get poor emulation, poor picture quality and a lacklustre game selection. Unlike the SEGA/Atari ones this seems to be well made, hdmi output and a great selection of games. The only retro console that was well made previously was that Neo Geo one that SNK torpedoed.  

 

Lets hope its a success and we see other companies doing the same. 

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5 hours ago, Revival said:

Really sad to see people underplaying the NES. A great system with an incredible lineup of games. There are still people trying to RGB old systems some thirty years later shows just how endearing the system is. Easily in my top three.

I really don't like the snobbery in the UK retrogaming circles towards the NES/Famicom. Yes, the machine wasn't a big deal over here, yes, it was a minor, very expensive, format. Still deserves massive respect though.

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I certainly wasn't underplaying the NES in my comment. Tbh I don't think anyone is are they? As Mr Pickford correctly points out, it had a collection of fantastically playable games and a wonderful controller. However the fact of the matter is that as you say yourself, it wasn't that big over here. That's all I was saying and I stand by it. :wacko:

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I'm more impressed that Nintendo decided to do this sort of thing than the actual product. I know that sounds Daft. But as everyone said, NES was a cool console and all, but the SNES is where it's at. Also looking at their own FAQ has some interesting info; they ask and answer something to the effect of. "Is there a SNES and N64 Version on the way?" To which they reply that they don't want to announce anything at this time!

 

In pure Nintendo fashion, they want to milk this a bit. Bring out the nes first, wait a year or so, then move onto the snes version (which I'd happily buy).

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I had a NES, enough of my friends also had one that I constantly swapped games with them. I remember lusting after the likes of Zelda and Mega Man 2 in my local Woolworths and (IIRC) Tesco. Then in the department stores they had those display units with multiple games.

 

Others in my school had a Master System, others an Amiga. NES games featured prominently in early episodes of Games Master. It was relatively late on, admittedly, when the 16-consoles were already out on import, but the 8-bit consoles always felt like a big deal and the beginning of modern gaming culture. As far as my school was concerned, they were. Plenty of genuine nostalgia for me.

 

Still got my copy of this...

 

57_f95e3be4-5055-4ef7-bf4d-6ff93e5fb32a_

 

Maybe it will be the same with Wii U in 30 years. "Nobody owned a Wii U, anyone who says they did is lying." But enough of us on here will remember playing Splatoon and Super Mario Maker.

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