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boxoctosis
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MGS V

OK hear me out - I loved and almost platinumed 1/2/3, but 4 was a case of: 'Will you please decide to be an action or a stealth game, thank you' and a load of other issues (but gameplay wise, that was The Biggie)

V ? Seems more gameplay-y, but I don't know what to do really: retreat when sirens go of or go in all guns blazing? Give up and wait and eternity for the sirens to stop?

Some tips appreciated, because :angry:

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MGS V

OK hear me out - I loved and almost platinumed 1/2/3, but 4 was a case of: 'Will you please decide to be an action or a stealth game, thank you' and a load of other issues (but gameplay wise, that was The Biggie)

V ? Seems more gameplay-y, but I don't know what to do really: retreat when sirens go of or go in all guns blazing? Give up and wait and eternity for the sirens to stop?

Some tips appreciated, because :angry:

Shoot everyone. Then go and stun punch a donkey.

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I made a choice a ways back to never abandon a game however many hours in and to just finish the fucking thing. This was after leaving Shadows of Mordor for ages and it took an age to learn the mechanics and systems all over again.

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MGS V is quite incredibly adaptive to whatever you do. It's completely acceptable to go for a complete ghost run, get spotted and end up blowing everything up while your gunship levels every bad guy in sight to the sound of the Airwolf theme. :)

But, err, yeah. I can't be arsed with it any more. It's mechanically superb, but mechanics alone don't tend to hold my attention without an engaging story to connect me to the world. V's story often feels like an afterthought, which is bizarre for a series that's doubled down on story to a fault in the past.

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I think it's a way of thinking that is prevalent in gaming circles. The idea of being a gamer is extremely homogenised, as far as gaming sites/forum hiveminds are concerned. The idea that a "gamer" should automatically like a certain type of game is a lot more prevalent than the idea that somebody who likes books should love every big name paperback or anyone who likes music should love whoever the current top sellers are.

I genuinely find the vast majority of open world games extremely boring and the majority of their massive length made up of boring drudgery as opposed to enjoyable, challenging gameplay.

I have never enjoyed a 3d GTA game, I have little to no interest in the vast majority of modern AAA titles, stuff like Dark Souls/Bloodborne just don't appeal to me due to the dark aesthethic/atmosphere and I've tried them but got no enjoyment out of it.

Maybe I just don't like videogames and should find a new hobby?

But I play and enjoy tons of games. Nintendo games, sega arcade classics (Daytona, Outrun 2 etc).

My most played PS4 games are Resogun and Rocket League.

I don't enjoy a lot of modern FPS games, but I downloaded all the Serious Sam games in the Steam Sale for pennies and have been enjoying First Encounter as much as I did when I was a teenager.

Usually when I abandon a game it's because I have gone against my better judgement and jumped onto the hype train for some big new release in a genre I have a history of not enjoying. Recentish examples include GTA 5, Xenoblade Chronicles X, MGS anything (most recently ground zeroes) ,various attemps to play classic rpgs that always get abandoned halfway through etc.

Anyway no idea where I'm going with this.

I hate a lot of games, including many big name popular games but I love other games including the occasional big name game (have been enjoying the witcher 3 lately) My tastes haven't changed over the years, but the type of games that a "gamer" is expected to automatically love has. Sometimes I get taken in by the hype train, but I generally regret it.

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Yeah, it's an attitude that's been around for as long as I've been browsing gaming forums (so, er, 18 years or so. Yikes). Evident in online comments sections since those became commonplace, where you get to see reviewers who dare step out of line and put out reviews even slightly less enthusiastic than is considered 'proper' for a given game being insulted, criticised and threatened for doing so. Culminating in that weird fucking ideal of 'objective' game reviews, because of course that's a logically attainable thing to aim for.

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Personally I like to think that it's because content and theme in gaming is now nearly as diverse as other media. The trouble is, we're pre-disposed as gamers to try everything. So even though I don't like sweary, violent gangster films, I still bought GTAV because it was supposed to be a great game. And I'm a gamer, so I should play all the great games, right? And of course, I hated it. Why wouldn't I, when I don't like the same themes and tone in any other media?

Obviously there are some classics that transcend genre, but it's no longer enough for me to play a game because it's a good game. It has to be of interest thematically.

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Yeah, that makes me hopeful that gradually these attitudes will fade away - as gaming diversifies more and more it should become more accepted that people are able to love games without loving all games, because there's simply so much variety, whereas going back to the '80s you only had a relatively narrow range of game types, broadly coming down to arcade-style games games, RPG/adventure games, simulations and strategy games. But even then most people would have had preferences - adventure gamers who didn't care for arcade games; or narrowing down a bit, shoot em up fans who weren't interested in platformers - but without the internet for people to shout at each other anonymously on it was much less of an issue.

Also, many of us would have been children, and children will play and enjoy pretty much any old shit uncritically ;)

I do disagree with that last part, mind: I don't think any titles, whether game, film, book, theatre, music or whatever, are so good that they can truly transcend their genre and have universal appeal. There are works are critically acclaimed and have particularly broad appeal, but even they won't cover anything. There are people who will never love romantic comedies or period dramas, even if they happen to be Pride and Prejudice; people who will never love Westerns, even if they happen to be Once Upon a Time in the West; people who will never love technical platformers, no matter that they be Mario 64 or Super Mario World. But then, that's something I've argued quite enough, I think.

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Normally I'm quite good at completing the games I start playing, but this year I've abandoned so many games even though I think it's actually been the first truly good year of the current gen consoles. Partly this is due to me having less free time due to being in a relationship for the first time in a couple of years, but also i think just the sheer volume of games coupled with the fact that most of the big games have been daunting open world affairs. I find it very hard to complete open world games because i usually eventually get bored of their repetitive structure and lots of dead time spent travelling around the world before I reach the end.

Witcher 3 - I thought this was pretty fantastic. The attention to detail, the great writing and cutscenes, the meaty subquests. The combat could have been better but overall I was pretty blown away by the time I spent with it. The thing, is I put 50 hours into it and I still was only on the first main map. I started feeling burnt out on the combat and overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of content. I put it down for what was meant to be a week or two and never picked it back up. Every time I considered continuing, I just realised i couldn't be bothered getting back into it. A shame but I'll probably never pick it back up again given how many games are out in the Spring.

MGS 5 - I loved this for a good 20-30 hours but then I got to the second location and realised all the missions were essentially identical and there was no glue holding everything together to maintain my interest. The level design was good and the mechanics were superb, but I just lost interest in infiltrating yet another military outpost in the middle of the desert/jungle with no real overarching motive or goal.

Broken Age - I got this with PS+ and completed Act 1 of the game, played about 15 minutes of act 2 and then deleted it from my PS4. I understand that Act 1 is the good half, in which case i don't really want to play the bad half which is set in the exact same locations. It wasn't terrible but I was borderline bored throughout my playtime. Neither very funny nor very dramatically interesting. It all felt very flat, despite the outlandish concepts on show. I've started playing Broken Sword 5 and am finding it a far more engaging adventure game despite the straightforward puzzles.

Fallout 4 - I really liked Fallout 3 but I haven't played more than about 3 hours of this despite buying it at launch. I was put off by the terrible conversation system, awful tutorials, dumbing down of the RPG mechanics and just an overarching sense of deja vu. Hearing the rather negative feedback about the quest design being one-dimension and combat orientated, and the main story poorly executed has me considering whether to even bother to play it again or just trade it in.

Looking back, most of the games I completed were quite straightforward and linear - Batman, Until Dawn, Life Is Strange, Ethan Carter, Everybody's Gone To The Rapture, Transistor. Bloodborne is probably the only outlier. I probably need to stop buying all these open world games as soon as they come out.

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I don't really abandon games (I can't think of any, though there have been a few that have come close) but I've definitely shifted my focus of what I play over the last couple of years. I've always been more interested in narrative-led games but, whereas I used to love the idea of some 40+ hour epic (in my head it was represented that I was getting value for money), these days the appeal of a focussed 8-10 hour game is much greater. I still have longer games on the go; I'm currently 30 hours into The Witcher 2, for example, and I've just wrapped-up nearly 60 hours on Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky - a game I was very close to abandoning) but I like to have some shorter stuff to supplement these. That's partly because of the satisfaction of finishing something, but partly because it allows a story to - in theory - be free of padding.

It's made me a lot more selective in what I buy, too. No more 4X titles which are time-sinks with no end; fewer open-world titles bought (fortunately I've never liked GTA or Metal Gear so avoiding those isn't a problem) and once upon a time I would have dumped hundreds of hours into Football Manager. Thankfully that game became a chore to play long ago so avoiding that is as much due to it being dull as it is a conscious choice.

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Looking at this thread, being a gen behind has not only saved me money but it looks like I've dodged some mediocre gaming.

I abandoned Pandora Tomorrow (I know) a while back. Love Splinter Cell 1 and 3 but this just felt off. Didn't like the open environments, didn't feel as tight as the other games. I'm playing through Chaos Theory now and its just marvelous ain't it? The mechanics and balance of weapons is perfect. Grabbing some clown from behind and throwing them off a bridge, pure glee. Fuck Batman. I AM BATMAN.

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Personally I like to think that it's because content and theme in gaming is now nearly as diverse as other media. The trouble is, we're pre-disposed as gamers to try everything. So even though I don't like sweary, violent gangster films, I still bought GTAV because it was supposed to be a great game. And I'm a gamer, so I should play all the great games, right? And of course, I hated it. Why wouldn't I, when I don't like the same themes and tone in any other media?

Obviously there are some classics that transcend genre, but it's no longer enough for me to play a game because it's a good game. It has to be of interest thematically.

Madden sells whatever high amount each year, I don't think I'm told to enjoy Madden. But those that do, do. I had relatives playing the latest Fifa whilst I'd bring in the Dreamcast, trying to persuade them to my unquestionably fantastic gaming tastes!*

Choice to enjoy what I want has always been my decision. Reviews/websites/videos help, and trying something broader beyond my tastes never hurt, but gaming media pushing 'everything' has never meant we should be into 'everything'. Media is just doing their job, stating what's out there.

*ba-boom tish

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I recently gave up on SW Uprising on iOS, got fed up with grinding through different locations that looked the same for credits. Now playing SW Commander and, guess what, grinding through different locations that look the same for credits. Stupid bloody Star Wars whore that I am.

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I don't know whether I'm getting my teeth into Persona or it's getting its teeth into me but I'm finally really sticking with it after two years.

No idea what I'm doing but the combat is simple enough to grasp and otherwise I'm just focussing on making the best Personas I can through fusion and making sure I focus on the areas where I have the strongest Social Link.

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Rise of the Triad (recent remake) - went back to this recently after drunkenly restarting and somehow making progress. The game is really good old-fashioned FPS fun, 90s-style level design, lots of enemies, looks good and is generally a decent update of a 90s classic. But the platforming can go to hell. It's the sort of game where you really do have to quick-save unless you like smashing keyboards against the wall in frustration (the number of times you quick-save affects your level score). However you cannot quick-save on moving platforms. Got to this room where you have to get to the top jumping on moving platforms whilst avoiding fireballs, frustrating enough without the fireballs, infuriating with them as they push you off. When you've spent an hour trying and trying and not got any higher, and cannot quick-save because it's all bloody moving platforms, you begin to think life's too short. A real shame as it's fun and I am keen to actually finish it. Might have to cheat my way past it.

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I gave up on The Evil Within, today. Gave it about four hours or something, but it's just a complete mess of a game in every way. It's like Mikami felt he had to make a horror game but had zero enthusiasm or inspiration for it, so he just ripped-off bits of every survival horror game of the last fifteen years (including his own).

It's so half-arsed. There's the village from RE4 but absolutely no fun whatsoever, there's the clicker bits from TLOU but really irritating, there's the hide-from-the-invincible-pursuer bits like Nope games but with poorly communicated and unfair stealth mechanics. They even put in some invisible enemies and the occasional surprise instadeath just for a laugh.

I often like that mid-tier, sub-AAA action-horror stuff we get from Japan but this seemed to have a fairly big budget and is just taking the piss. At least Deadly Premonition was funny and surprisingly interesting. The only thing I discerned from the story over four hours is that there's a teleporting man with a white hood and spooooky things happen for some reason (maybe because of the teleporting man with the white hood).

Here is what you need to do to upgrade your skills: Travel through a magic mirror, sit through an unskippable animation of you waking up, slowly walk out of the room, down a corridor, through another room, through a door into another room and then watch another little animation of you sitting down, choose skills from a menu, sit through another animation of you getting up, walk back to the mirror and wait to get back to the fucking game. All that for what every other game of the last ten years sensibly puts on the pause menu. Occasionally something slightly spooky will happen to distract you as you walk to the chair, as if to try and justify this nonsense.

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Elder Scrolls Online.

I'm not much on an online player, but I loved Destiny and I love Elder Scrolls games. Thinking it would be a mixture of the two, I also hoped this would scratch the itch of wanting a next gen Skyrim / Oblivion.

It turned out to be rather underwhelming in the end. I have no desire to go back to it, I'd rather restart Skyrim on my PS3 and play that (another game I abandoned and I'm not sure why?!)

In fact I gave up on Oblivion too?! Maybe I don't love Elder Scrolls games after all?!

All this talk of Fallout 4 though, I'll see that through to the end even though I don't rate it nearly as highly as Fallout 3 (my favourite game ever, got all but one achievement) and New Vegas (managed to see 3 of the endings).

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Late to this thread...

I've not really "Abandoned" Fallout 4 but I feel like I've given up on it none-the-less. Basically, I've done the main storyline and finished it, but these open world choose-your-own-ending games always make you feel a bit like you abandoned it because you didn't do the 300 side quests you didn't bother with, or you didn't uncover the whole map. So I get the fatigue shown in this thread with open world games.

I love the concept of them and they always excited me but now I have very limited time to play games (I'm between flats, so my gaming PC is at my parents, so I have to visit them to play) I'm missing something linear.

I waffled about this in the FO4 thread, but I'm hungry for games with a good narrative that doesn't get complicated and potentially shit by way of having to have multiple story chains because people feel like they need to give you 'choice'. I am a bit out of touch with games at the moment so I don't know whether these kinds of games are in a minority now with all the open-worldedness of everything but I want something with a bit of character progression like Fallout, but I want the story to be on rails.

Next in my list is Bioshock Infinite, having never played it before and because I'm just going to run the rails shooting things as I go. Either that or Dragon Age Inquisition. I'm not sure how OW Dragon Age is, so I should probably wait.

The other game I've sort of abandoned telling myself I'll go back to it is Elite. I loved it, but again, with limited time to play, when half of my play time is just watching a distance marker tick down I'm not sure I can deal with it. I'm just stuck in this hump with it when I don't feel like I'm making money efficiently. I'm either too weak for killing people and I don't understand trading enough (and travelling just takes too much time) to make great yields. I'm sure with a bit of perseverance I could get past that, get a new ship, try out planetary landing and the whole thing would click, but as I say - limited time, I need some instant gratification. I think it's high time I moved away from RPG stuff for a little bit. Things with overwhelming stats. Bioshock should be perfect.

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Darksiders 2

Bought as on sale on the wii u and a couple of hours into it just confirms why other than smaller scale Indy stuff I still really don't need to worry about the lack of third party support for nintendo consoles.

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Fallout 4 - I really liked Fallout 3 but I haven't played more than about 3 hours of this despite buying it at launch. I was put off by the terrible conversation system, awful tutorials, dumbing down of the RPG mechanics and just an overarching sense of deja vu. Hearing the rather negative feedback about the quest design being one-dimension and combat orientated, and the main story poorly executed has me considering whether to even bother to play it again or just trade it in.

It's worth sinking another couple of hours into just exploring the world they've built- there's a lot of pleasure in just setting across the map with your dog and seeing what happens. In fact that's probably the best thing about the game.

I'm hitting fatigue with it at 35 hours or so. I put it down for a month and didn't really miss it, and picked it back up. Main problem is pretty much every mission I've had involves "go here, kill that". And while I love the combat system, I do wish there's a bit more to the game- even Fallout 3 had you grappling with re-housing issues at Tenpenny, or what to do with a mistaken God at Oasis and so on.

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