Jump to content
rllmuk
Yoshimax

Crackdown 3

Recommended Posts

I`m reluctant to say they nailed it until we see it in action outside of controlled demos and in real matches across the internet on varying connection types.

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely a single player version of the revolutionary cloud based destruction stuff, 20x the power of Xbox One, would mean they'd have to dedicate multiple servers for every player. There's no way they'd do that.

So any single player variant would have to be massively cutdown, less/no destruction, or something else!

It's not the old-style dedicated server model though is it? The whole point of the new Cloud paradigm is a super massive bunch of servers which can be re-purposed on demand, they just need enough overall compute power available to handle any peak load from all the various customers of their Azure platform, it's where all the money is being pissed up the wall in the arms race to be the best server farm.

Edit: After reading the French news, it seems they decided to bow to consumer demand and make an offline mode which means the physics are toned down considerably as a result anyway. Though with the way physics can get offloaded to the GPU, they could have decided to go lo-fi on the graphics and used more of the GPU for physics compute instead, though the X1 isn't quite as built for that as the PS4.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will they finally be able to make a proper fire fighting game now with actual procedural fire if you don't put it out and stuff?

That would be amazing.

You could possibly do proper scenery deformation too.. e.g. having a bulldozer you can actually use to 'push' a volume of soil, creating a channel in the ground and an appropriately sized mass of earth at the end..

You could avert flood or fire disasters by making fire breaks or channels to divert the water..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They could do a fantastic disaster recovery game like they had on the ps2 - rescue people from fires, earthquakes, floods, avalanches etc but all procedurally generated and different depending on what you did or didn't do.

Or more likely, they'll use the power of the cloud to make your brawny marine have a slightly shinier gun. Or procedurally generated stubble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The destruction physics are insane. MS have been making great strides to turn xbone around recently. Is the cloud no longer Lol but a genuine game changer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Videogamer.com editor:

https://twitter.com/VG_Dave/status/629246925062164480

Single Player game has limited destruction

100% destruction for online co-op game

Co-developed by Sumo

Multiplayer map is completely different to Single Player map...

Also:

http://www.gamesradar.com/crackdown-3-effectively-turns-your-xbox-one-most-powerful-console-ever-made/

You'd think this would require an immense internet connection to keep it rolling, not least when four players (this is the current maximum size for a multiplayer party, although it could increase) are doing the same thing in four separate corners of the city, but the relative ease of swapping information between Xbox and server means the strain is fairly small. Jones says that his team are optimising the game for a 2-4mbps connection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watching Dave Jones demoing the tech did leave some questions about how this all works, are they doing most of the work locally and sending off the physics calculations to the server when needed or does the game run primarily on a server and they just send out updates to the client like in an MMO/game with dedicated servers? As the way he talked about variable server load spread across multiple servers depending on demand was a bit puzzling.

He's apparently changed company as when this was announced at E3, it was being done by Cloudgine, which he helped found. And this is the explanation on their website about their tech:

The term "Cloud Gaming" has been on the tech radar for a while now but it has never really taken off and therefore it has generated a lot of scepticism in the games industry. Why? We strongly believe that the main reason was the lack of unique and ground-breaking game experiences specifically crafted for a distributed Cloud environment.

This is where we step in. We created Cloudgine with the ambitious goal of demonstrating that Cloud Gaming has much more to offer beyond the traditional pixel streaming of existing games. By leveraging the immense power available within data centres, computationally intensive game components such as physics and A.I. can be supercharged in order to deliver game experiences that go well beyond what any console or PC can offer now or in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watching Dave Jones demoing the tech did leave some questions about how this all works, are they doing most of the work locally and sending off the physics calculations to the server when needed or does the game run primarily on a server and they just send out updates to the client like in an MMO/game with dedicated servers? As the way he talked about variable server load spread across multiple servers depending on demand was a bit puzzling.

It's not 'a' server the game calls up multiple (virtual) servers dynamically when load increases..

In that demo video it showed different buildings were being calculated by different servers simultaneously, with debris from one building switching across to being calculated by the other server instantly as it started interacting with it..

Assumption is that both the server and the local machines hold a copy of the city geometry, the consoles send player/projectile info, the server updates the city as projectiles impact buildings, does all the breakage/physics calculations and sends the updated geometry back to the consoles every frame..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stu implied he would take your bet 2 pages back. Daft argument in general really though as you said one thing (single player) but meant something else.

And someone could have won a months subscriber status if they'd taken me up on the bet...

How about I bet you a years supporter status there's no offline mode.

And you said a year, not a month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will it be possible for my agent to get naked and press his balls up against office windows while people work inside, or is that multiplayer only?

Destructible environment, not hostile work place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bit of info on the single player game here:

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/crackdown-3-gamescom-hands-preview-xbox-one-takes-series-cloud-nine-fourteen-1514395

Let's begin with that campaign. It is structured exactly the same as the celebrated original, with your Agency enforcer tasked with taking out warlords who have an entirely new city in their grip. There are orbs, of course, the same five abilities to power up (strength, firearms, driving, agility and explosives) and a transforming Agency super-vehicle. The map is also roughly the same size as the original, only with a greater sense of height, we're told.

There are some changes, however. Firstly, developer Reagent Games – led by the original game's director Dave Jones – is looking to expand the roles of the warlords by making them more fully realised characters, with personalities rather than mere targets.
During a behind-closed-doors demo, Jones was eager to point out that the team didn't want any additional narrative to alter the flow of play – so Crackdown 3 uses the "digital fabric" of its environment to allow warlords to speak directly to you. This means they can appear on billboards or as massive holographic heads, such were the two examples we saw. A new "hate meter" will also play into how gamers draw out and take down these warlords. The more of their foot soldiers you dispatch, the more strongholds you take back from them and more destruction you cause, the more the warlord will hate you until eventually they snap and decide to take you on.
The warlord in our demo was far more of the bastard, though. Donning a large mech suit, he didn't go after the player, but civilians – making a point of taking innocent lives to get to the Agency he despises. The mech itself requires different tactics to dispatch. Bullet fire isn't effective, so players must use grenades, rocket launchers and the environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm liking the sound of that. I absolutely loved Crackdown's approach, just giving you the world and objectives and letting you get on with it. Giving some more flavour to the bad guys is a good direction to go - hopefully they'll be pretty different.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All this talk of bets has just reminded me:

I'll bet you a tenner you can call in a UAV when you get three kills in Battlefield 3. Like that's as predictable as "it will have red dot sights" and "there will be an XP based progression mechanic in multiplayer" and, oh - everything else about that game.

Hi, I'll take that bet.

Pay up, RJ! :quote:

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really liked the way taking down bits around the warlords did things like gave his guards worse guns, or slower reinforcements etc, i do hope that's expanded on a bit more too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.