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Alejandro G. Iñárritu's The Revenant - Leonardo Di Caprio, Tom Hardy

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I managed to get it on my tv and it looked really good on there, I loved every minute. One seriously beautiful film with a really effective score, I can't decide where I would place this but I think it will be in my top 3 of the year. I want to see it at the cinema too but it's not out for a while over here.

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I thought it was dull and overly long. Started off well enough then just seemed to drag forever. Looked nice enough in terms of scenery but some of the green screen stuff was really bad.

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It's gruelling. I've watched the DVD screener.

Without spoiling it, you watch one man basically go through utter hell. It reminded me of The Passion of The Christ. It takes a long time to get to the finale but it's not tedious. The action scenes are incredibly brutal. It reminded me of Cormac McCarthy's western novels in places. I thought it was a very good film.

Spot on. Definitely has a Cormac McCarthy vibe to it.

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I thought this was excellent. DiCaprio's character's journey was never in any way tedious. I think we're used to seeing characters bounce back from adversity in just a couple of scenes in too many blockbusters, so this is a very welcome change of pace. It looked stunning on the small screen, so definitely want to catch it at the cinema. Hope DiCaprio bags that Oscar. I think he deserves it.

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I thought it was dull and overly long. Started off well enough then just seemed to drag forever. Looked nice enough in terms of scenery but some of the green screen stuff was really bad.

Yeah but... They didn't use green screens.

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I thought this was excellent. DiCaprio's character's journey was never in any way tedious. I think we're used to seeing characters bounce back from adversity in just a couple of scenes in too many blockbusters, so this is a very welcome change of pace. It looked stunning on the small screen, so definitely want to catch it at the cinema. Hope DiCaprio bags that Oscar. I think he deserves it.

Agree with all of this, I was enthralled from the start. Having read some of the negative comments in this thread I was waiting for it to get boring, but it never did. I wasn't overly excited beforehand, I attempted to watch Birdman recently and was completely underwhelmed - this doesn't even feel like the same director thankfully. It reminded me of Gladiator actually in some ways. One of a small number of films that pulls no punches and leaves you knackered by the end (and not just because of the length). Will definitely try and schedule a cinema visit for this.

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Watched this earlier ... Fucking hell... It's not what I'd call comfortable viewing... Cracking film though.... Feel like I need a lie down after watching it...

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Odd one, this. It's technically superb and the amount of effort gone into making it is clearly apparent, but I was completely disengaged from it on any emotional or narrative level throughout. On many occasions the trickery on display - whilst not giving itself away in terms of quality - made me more concerned with the how of a scene rather than the why. It just doesn't seem to have anything interesting to say, and I didn't care about the characters at all. Indeed, the hardships heaped upon DiCaprio genuinely start to become tiresome. I was never unaware that I was in a cinema technically deconstructing the making of a film playing in front of me.

Late in the film, when he turns to see an avalanche in the distance I swore to myself I'd get up and leave if he got caught in it.

The film feels every minute of its run time, and while it's visually arresting enough to not quite become boring, it's fascinating to me how this is going to play with the Saturday night popcorn crowd. It's absolutely worth seeing and a tremendous piece of craft, but it's no masterpiece in my book. It's all icing and no bun, or something.

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Odd one, this. It's technically superb and the amount of effort gone into making it is clearly apparent, but I was completely disengaged from it on any emotional or narrative level throughout. On many occasions the trickery on display - whilst not giving itself away in terms of quality - made me more concerned with the how of a scene rather than the why. It just doesn't seem to have anything interesting to say, and I didn't care about the characters at all. Indeed, the hardships heaped upon DiCaprio genuinely start to become tiresome. I was never unaware that I was in a cinema technically deconstructing the making of a film playing in front of me.

While I enjoyed Birdman, this basically describes Innaritu's entire oeuvre.

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Odd one, this. It's technically superb and the amount of effort gone into making it is clearly apparent, but I was completely disengaged from it on any emotional or narrative level throughout. On many occasions the trickery on display - whilst not giving itself away in terms of quality - made me more concerned with the how of a scene rather than the why. It just doesn't seem to have anything interesting to say, and I didn't care about the characters at all. Indeed, the hardships heaped upon DiCaprio genuinely start to become tiresome. I was never unaware that I was in a cinema technically deconstructing the making of a film playing in front of me.

Late in the film, when he turns to see an avalanche in the distance I swore to myself I'd get up and leave if he got caught in it.

The film feels every minute of its run time, and while it's visually arresting enough to not quite become boring, it's fascinating to me how this is going to play with the Saturday night popcorn crowd. It's absolutely worth seeing and a tremendous piece of craft, but it's no masterpiece in my book. It's all icing and no bun, or something.

I saw this today and this sums it up perfectly. I don't know what it is about DiCaprio but he never fully convinces me.

His recovery after the bear attack and his continued survival seemed incongruous in a film that otherwise felt brutally realistic.

At the odeon where I saw it the picture seemed quite dark and almost out of focus. I don't know whether that was a result of the fact that it was filmed using natural light or down to a poor projection.

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Very pretty, some amazingly brutal bits. Impressive technical stuff. Think it really nailed the terrifying enormity of a very wild and dangerous North America at that time. Tom Hardy's dialogue while authentic and cool, was very hard to understand on occasion. Think Kermode was spot on when comparing this to Apocalypto in regards to this film not having the same brilliant sense of momentum which that film had.

While something like that obviously wasn't what was intended for The Revenant, I definitely think it could have benefitted from it.

Either that or they could've gone the There Will Be Blood/Jessie James route of having us see much more time pass for the characters. Adding a bit more weight to the character focused stuff

And then if that couldn't work, a shorter film along the lines of No Country for Old Men, or even as short as Slow West might've been nice.

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It fucking is boring. I said it before, They can chop off an hour of this film and still have a perfectly coherent narrative. The story it tells is incredibly basic. This film is filled with cinematic fluff.

It's probably boring for you because you watched it at home, on some 'screener' copy that you justified to yourself that's it ok to watch, on a relatively small screen and with moderately decent speakers.

It's (sort of) your choice how you watch it, but I've just come back from an IMAX screening of it and I was enthralled for the entirety of the running time. The narrative is paper thin but it didn't matter; it's a technical masterpiece that's one of the most astonishing things I've ever experienced at the cinema.

For once, I actually feel sorry for people who've pirated a film. You've done yourself a massive disservice in not seeing this as it was intended.

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Funny, my local Odeon suffers from the same issue. Everything looks too dark. I avoid the Odeon if I can.

That's because they are trying to save money on projector bulbs by turning the ampage down.

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Saw it.

Wow.

Blown away. One of my favourite films ever.

Deserves Oscars for best picture, best director, best actor, best cinematography and best sound design at the least - easily, in my opinion.

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Saw it.

Wow.

Blown away. One of my favourite films ever.

Deserves Oscars for best picture, best director, best actor, best cinematography and best sound design at the least - easily, in my opinion.

I wouldn't be quite so fulsome in praise, but you do make a good point about the sound design and it's something that been overlooked to an extent. Essentially, it's really quite spectacular in places. One of the few positives I took away from Creed was its sound design, but seeing Revenant the day after really put it to shame.

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It's probably boring for you because you watched it at home, on some 'screener' copy that you justified to yourself that's it ok to watch, on a relatively small screen and with moderately decent speakers.

It's (sort of) your choice how you watch it, but I've just come back from an IMAX screening of it and I was enthralled for the entirety of the running time. The narrative is paper thin but it didn't matter; it's a technical masterpiece that's one of the most astonishing things I've ever experienced at the cinema.

For once, I actually feel sorry for people who've pirated a film. You've done yourself a massive disservice in not seeing this as it was intended.

Isn't it the very same screener that gets sent out to all the Oacar voters though?

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It's probably boring for you because you watched it at home, on some 'screener' copy that you justified to yourself that's it ok to watch, on a relatively small screen and with moderately decent speakers.

It's (sort of) your choice how you watch it, but I've just come back from an IMAX screening of it and I was enthralled for the entirety of the running time. The narrative is paper thin but it didn't matter; it's a technical masterpiece that's one of the most astonishing things I've ever experienced at the cinema.

For once, I actually feel sorry for people who've pirated a film. You've done yourself a massive disservice in not seeing this as it was intended.

So was this film only intended to be seen on the big screen then? If so I expect the filmmakers will be happy for the film never to be seen again once it's cinema run has finished.

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Well, that was fucking fantastic. Incredibly bleak, incredibly beautiful and incredibly tense throughout with an amazing score. I fully expected to be underwhelmed after being disappointed in Birdman, but this more than made up for that. Will definitely be in my 2016 best of list and it's only the 3rd week of the new year.

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Wow, what a spectacle. Some of the shots are beyond beautiful. Leo was amazing & Tom Hardy is fast becoming my favourite actor. Glad someone above mentioned the sound design. I thought that side of it was pretty damn special.

9/10 Bear Grylls.

Oh & now I want to go & play red dead redemption in the mountains now.

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Saw it last night in the cinema. Agree it's pretty, but at around the 2.5 hour mark I suddenly became aware of the time. Could easily cut it down I think. For me, it's the sort of film id watch in the cinema - if it was on the tv id probably turn it off after an hour.

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That's all fine. :) I still found it boring. I'm gonna leave this thread alone now, else I venture into Smitty vs Tomb Raider territory.

After having a go at LeChuck for turning it off half way through and calling it boring I have to admit having seen the film, I kind of agree.

It looked and sounded amazing, everyone in it was at the top of their game, Hardy and Poulter particularly, but the film bored me past the half an hour mark.

The action was incredible when it was there but we spend

two hours with Leonardo DiCaprio just crawling around getting the shit kicked out of him. Nothing had really been done to endear me to his character and then a big CGI bear comes out and beats him up and then everything after that was just him struggling. I didn't care. I found myself watching the fight at the end, an amazing cinematic achievement, thinking "I WISH I WAS INTO THIS!!! IT SHOULD BE AMAZING BUT I DON'T CARE WHAT HAPPENS!!! All of the stuff with Gleeson, Poulter and Hardy was great, three interesting characters with well drawn motivations and back stories.

Then it cuts back to old Leo giving it his all and I just didn't really care. I get it, he's having a pretty rubbish time. But I didn't care enough about the character to want to spend that time with him. Maybe if it does grab you then you're willing him through, but it never seemed like he was trying to get anywhere specific, just moving along. What would have happened if he'd not been forced down the waterfall? Would he still have found his way back? I understand that this kind of film shouldn't have to spell everything that happens out but it all just seemed a little unfocussed.

I wasn't a fan of Birdman really, quite enjoyed it, but I think the two films leave me with the same feeling. They're a bit po faced, a case of style over substance, and... well... a bit cold.

The whole thing works quite well as a metaphor for Leo's hunt for an Oscar though. The things he's willing to go through to get that golden statue etc.

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I'm amazed anyone found this flick boring. I found it riveting throughout, and the film flew by. A spectacular movie.

I did watch it sat in the front row of a whacking great screen mind you. I was trying to dodge the arrows in that first scene. I can't imagine it grips you in the same way if you watch it on a telly.

I hope Leo gets the Oscar for Best Grunting In A Motion Picture.

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@BitterToad

Well, at this point I'll have to delve into spoiler territory in order to address issues of motivation and direction, and the point of the whole thing, rather than the look and sound of the film.

Thematically, as with the plot itself, it's very simple. BitterToad has sort of nailed it by saying (I don't think this is a spoiler) 'it never seemed like he was trying to get anywhere specific, just moving along.' That's quite wrong up to a point, but then it becomes entirely correct - it is the point of the film. Which is why this is ultimately not so much a revenge movie as one about survival - but it's a take on survival that's not the usual Hollywood one (one example of which would be the one where the astronaut does Super Mario all the way home). And neither is it the usual uplifting-yet-sad revenge story where everyone is reunited in the comfort of death's embrace (see: the one with Russell Crowe as the Gladiator). And both those were Oscar favourites, so why not this? Maybe because, despite it having been touted before its release by cynical wags as Oscar Bait, it's at least tried a different take from the usual crowd-pleasers.

Here be spoilers. Don't read them if you haven't seen the film.

Here's how I saw it. And as I said, it isn't complicated at all. The film tells you what it's all about in the opening scenes, largely by flashback. He thinks back to his son as a small boy, who is injured, and him telling the boy 'I know you want this to be over. But don't give up. I'm here. I'll always be here. As long as you can take a breath, you fight. You keep breathing.' And this line about still being breathing is referred to throughout the film. It's Glass's motif. Just keep breathing. Despite everything that happens, he's always still breathing.

Why does he keep breathing after the bear attack? Because of his son; to be with him. Why does he keep breathing after his son's death? To avenge him. He tries to stop breathing - he finds his son's body and lays his head on the corpse in the falling snow, and tries to die with him, to always be with him again. But he doesn't freeze to death. He wakes up. He's still breathing. He can't be with him, just like he can't be with his wife, whose ghostly apparition appears in his fevered dreams through the film. 'He took away the only thing I had,' Glass says of his son's killer. And so his aim from that point is to avenge that. Is it survival? Not for its own sake. He doesn't want that - he wants revenge. And while taking it, his son's killer reminds him it won't bring his son back. He won't be with him again. After giving his revenge to the natives - he realises he doesn't want it after all, he wants what's not possible - he expects them to kill him too. But they don't. One act of almost-kindness saves him, and curses him to further survival - he again sees his wife, in the woods, and he follows her, but she disappears. Right at the end of the film the camera closes on his face, looking into his eyes, and they look dead. It's a mask of realisation that he's still breathing. The screen goes dark, freezing on those dead eyes, and Glass's breathing is the only sound left. He's still breathing. He still survives. And it's a curse.

That's why the film is about stoicism. It's not about revenge. It's about just putting up with being alive. It's not a hymn to survival where the survivor learns to live again in a triumphantly unlikely finale, like it is in Gravity. It's not about the hero whose family is taken from him but who exacts his revenge at length and is reunited in Elysian fields with his wife and child - it's not Gladiator. There is no reunion, just the sound of a man alone, breathing, at the end, and 'while you take a breath, you fight. You keep breathing.' Even when we know he wants it to be over. So that dead look in the eyes is the realisation of a man who wants to die - to be with those he loves - that he's still alive. His survival instinct is very real, but it's a curse. Like an inverted superpower. He just keeps breathing. Why? Because, evidently, it's what he does. Even when he doesn't want to.

So in answer to your question, where he's trying to go is somewhere he can't get. The whole revenge-journey thing is a red herring, a distraction. He's lost from the second his son dies, and he never finds his way back from that. He just survives, physically. Because he's built that way, to keep breathing. But he'd have been better off dead, although he only really recognises the full weight of that curse of survival at the end.

#stoicismrulesLeoForTheOscar

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a good effective-if one dimensional- film but i thoroughly reject the idea seeing it in your comfy warm cinema would have the power to make you feel as if you are truly there, as opposed to simply viewing it in yer house with a mug of hot cocoa or whatever...that is needlessly patronising nonsense.

If you're arguing it better does justice to the cinematography etc then fair enough, i'd agree but leave it at that.

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