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The Terry Pratchett Thread

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There are also a plethora of other things, plays, graphic novels, maps, TV programmes and cartoons, as well as the two games (which I have never played! Despite owning both).

Four games. Just sayin'.

Five if you include the MUD. Six if you include the 2006 Java mobile game.

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Good post. I've only just read the Colour of Magic and while I can't say I disliked it, it also didn't make me want to jump in and read others in the series. I think I'll give Mort a try next and see if that one clicks with me more.

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:) I knew I'd probably miss plenty of stuff in the opening post. :)

Are they worth playing?

The first one (The Colour of Magic) is, yes. The Discworld and Discworld II games are good but the puzzles are often somewhat obtuse. Never played the MUD, Noir or the Java game. I think Noir is generally considered a bit crap though.

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Good post. I've only just read the Colour of Magic and while I can't say I disliked it, it also didn't make me want to jump in and read others in the series. I think I'll give Mort a try next and see if that one clicks with me more.

Like the man said, the first two are atypical, but useful if you want to understand the Rincewind/Wizards books. Otherwise, Guards, Guards is a good starting point.

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I was living in Austraila when I heard he died and for some reason that meant it didn't really sink it with me. It was only a few weeks ago then I noticed a VCL up date was called "Terry Pratchett" that my brain kinda clicked "No more Terry Pratchety means no more books" and I got sad.

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I think I've misfired both times I've read his work. First one I read was Good Omens when it came out which I didn't enjoy, felt like bad Douglas Adams and was enough to put me off until I picked up The Long Earth this year, but again didn't really enjoy it- more because it's got a fantastic premise but a wafer-thin plot and I found myself less and less interested in it as it went on.

But I also realise both of these are collaborations, so what would someone recommend as the Terry Pratchett book to read, the classic, because I feel I must be missing out on something due to the enthusiasm that everyone else has with him.

The joke about tapes in cars turning into Queen tapes was good though. Can't argue with that.

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Guards Guards is a solid choice for a starting point. I wouldn't say it's the strongest of the Watch Books. Men at Arms and Feet of Clay have more of a whodunnit feel but it's good introduction to the characters.

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Mort, Small Gods, Wyrd Sisters or Guards! Guards! Are all good starting points.

What do you think you'd like to read about? The Grim Reaper looking for an apprentice? Pratchett does Religion/Politics? Witches dealing with a Hamlet situation? Or Downtrodden City Guards try to deal with a Dragon?

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Yeah, the go-to starting points are Wyrd Sisters, Mort and Guards! Guards!; I'm a big fan of Small Gods too, but I've found that one to be a little more divisive (purely as it's a tad 'heavier' than the other books).

Of course, I started the Discworld when I was a lot younger and had no idea it was a series, to began with Interesting Times (and Pratchett in general with Only You Can Save Mankind), so what do I know!

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I've always been an enormous Pratchett, fan to the extent I've read pretty much all of the Discworld series multiple times over the years and my original copy of Good Omens is falling apart (and is accompanied now by 2 signed copies...). I started reading his stuff with the Bromeliad trilogy, went through the Johnny books and ended up reading Jingo when I was far too young for it really. Soon I was buying a new book every couple of weeks and they're all still sat here next to me on the bookshelf.

I decided to start a run through of the series a just after he died (just days after my father died, it's not an exaggeration that I felt the loss of Pratchett even as I only just comprehending my fathers death), and on Pyramids at the moment. I know the traditional thinking is jump into the series with Guards Guards, Small Gods, Wyrd Sisters or Mort... but going back to Pyramids it really is a good place to start. The opening of the novel, with the graduation test, is just brilliant. I know he was proud of that whole section of the book, and it really shows. It's the moment where Ankh Morpork feels most fleshed out for the first time, and it's just a great piece of writing. The wider novel also introduces a lot of his style and ideas, as well as makes it plainly obvious where the series would head for a while as an overt parody of various things.

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The Witches books are some of my favourites. I was disappointed that following Carpe Jugulum, we never had any further entries in the main Discworld series about Granny, Nanny, Magrat and PerditaX Agnes. But in retrospect, it was a good move for him to switch over to the Tiffany Aching books, and make Granny a mentor rather than the primary character. That whole last section of A Hat Full of Sky, when the threat has been defeated and it's mostly just Granny and Tiffany talking, is one of my favourite sections of any Discworld novel.

Just a shame that so much of the Tiffany books is focused on the Feegles (and their dialect). They can be amusing in short doses, but as individual characters, they're not the most fascinating!

I Shall Wear Midnight made a very satisfying conclusion to her story. I haven't read Raising Steam or Dodger yet and have heard mixed opinions about them, but I really hope The Shepherd's Crown isn't as disappointing as Snuff.

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The first one (The Colour of Magic) is, yes. The Discworld and Discworld II games are good but the puzzles are often somewhat obtuse. Never played the MUD, Noir or the Java game. I think Noir is generally considered a bit crap though.

The MUD is an amazing achievement. Last time I went there (years ago) they had almost the whole Discworld explorable in mud-o-vision, and a really great community. I don't know if it has gone off the boil in recent years, or maybe it's got even bigger since Terry's death brought it a whole new audience.

Of the books, I find it impossible to pick a favourite. Maybe Lords and Ladies, maybe Pyramids, maybe Small Gods, maybe Soul Music - something from that era of Discworld probably, when he was really getting into his stride and had properly worked out what Discworld was meant to be.

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I've always been an enormous Pratchett, fan to the extent...

...that you've adopted Carrot's approach to punctuation? ;)

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I read a few of his books in my teenage years including Mort, Small Gods, Guards Guards and a few of the wizardy ones I think. Small Gods was always the one that stuck with me.

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The forth (and presumably last?) Long Earth book - The Long Utopia- is out now, having been released to absolutely no fanfare for some reason (I only know because I spotted it in Tesco). Things like his official Facebook page made no mention, despite being actively managed by someone and plugging forthcoming the last Discworld book etc.

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Yeah, I've got it sat on my kindle, preordered it ages ago. I've had an odd relationship with the books, they are interesting and the concept is great, but so little happens that I couldn't recommend them. Having said that I am looking forward to reading it, who knows maybe this one will make rest worthwhile...

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Apparently it was always supposed to be a five book series, so I suppose there will be one more which is at least based on an overall arc he had a hand in (don't know how directly he'll have been involved in the writing of course, or even was in the forth). Personally I quite like the just going around exploring of it all; it's more when some actual plot happens that I dislike!

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Of the books, I find it impossible to pick a favourite. Maybe Lords and Ladies, maybe Pyramids, maybe Small Gods, maybe Soul Music

Small Gods. There's an edge to it that makes the conclusion that much more satisfying.

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I think I've misfired both times I've read his work. First one I read was Good Omens when it came out which I didn't enjoy, felt like bad Douglas Adams and was enough to put me off until I picked up The Long Earth this year, but again didn't really enjoy it- more because it's got a fantastic premise but a wafer-thin plot and I found myself less and less interested in it as it went on.

But I also realise both of these are collaborations, so what would someone recommend as the Terry Pratchett book to read, the classic, because I feel I must be missing out on something due to the enthusiasm that everyone else has with him.

The joke about tapes in cars turning into Queen tapes was good though. Can't argue with that.

Try and find the BBC Radio adaptation of it, it's only a couple of hours and is pretty well done, Peter Serefrefeeeeeronwicnitzz ( how ever you spell his name ) and Brian from Spaced do the voices for the two main characters.

I am up to "Wintersmith" on maybe my 4th or 5th listen to the entire series, I only got into them around 2007, used to have a book on the go whilst working each day .

Think one of my favourites has to be Thief of Time with the History Monks, although they are all brilliant.

I tend to dredd the early witches ones though, as although the story is great, the woman reading it doesn't do it justice, and so far I have been unable to find any read by someone else.

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A bit of an unexpected bonus today - saw the latest Pratchett/Baxter book in Asda that I didn't know was due out. The Long Utopia.

Looking forward to sitting down with it later.

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I enjoyed the Long Earth books but I don't think they really worked that well. Very unfocused with an unsatisfying ending (To all four books in fact). I hope there does turn out to be a book 5 incoming. There's so much more that can be done with the setting.

Pratchett-wise I own all the Discworld books in a mixture of mostly paper with the most recent ones in ebook form and I'm currently buying all the kindle versions a couple a month.

Standout arcs for me (And I suspect almost everyone else) are the Witches and the Nightwatch. Guards Guards isn't the best example but still an excellent place to start. Wyrd Sisters however stands the test of time for me. Even if my fave is Witches Abroad. I do like Rincewind (And indeed The Last Continent and Interesting Times are amazing) but Rincewind isn't normally my first choice for a reread and the first two Discworld books in my opinion are probably best served last.

I like the death series but to be honest I don't think I could read Mort again. I love Soul Music and Reaper Man though. Standalone standouts for me are stuff like Monstrous Regiment (I utterly love this book), Pyramids, Small Gods and Thief of Time.

I also love the wizards of the Unseen University. I didn't much like the Unseen Academicals though. I didn't get the impression Terry was fully on board for that one. A weird quality blip.

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