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World Endurance Championship (WEC) Thread

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Well technically the "group C" era is 1982-85 then it was the World Sports-prototypes. 86-90. But the WSP seasons were all run under the Group C rules. Open engine regs from a homologated source, with a limit on the amount of fuel available for the race, effectively 330 litres per 1000Km.

 

Then in 1990 the FIA got twitchy that group C was almost as popular as F1 and introduced the 3.5l engines. But as the F1 engine suppliers had spent billions developing the engines for F1 the back bone of the endurance world (the independent teams like ADA, spice etc) couldn't afford the price tags and all quit.

Group C cars are grandfathered at Le Mans for a number of years, until 1997 when the Porsche WSC gets its final win. It was a Jag XJR-14 body shell with the roof cut off and the Porsche flat 6 for the old 80's 962 era. 

 

Proper 3.5l engine cars won in 92 and 93 with the Peugeot cars that looked and sounded amazing, when they held together.  But they were the only ones. the Jag with its Metro 6R4 engine looked just as amazing but it was really fragile. 

 

but by 95 the ACO and split Le mans off from the FI endurance championship. Because Le Mans was and still is, bigger than the FIA and the world championship.  

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On 23/06/2019 at 22:20, Sidewaysbob said:

The idea being that it would force the other teams to race and break them. Which is sort of what happened, but the Renown car just kept on going

 

I like that, reminds me of when a big cycling team sends 1 or 2 into a breakaway.

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It's also why despite being the iffy team on reliability in the middle of the decade, Toyota are now much more rock solid and have to resort to faking a tyre mistake to let Alonso win.

 

Because they're not being raced and thus don't have to push.

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On ‎29‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 10:52, Dudley said:

It's also why despite being the iffy team on reliability in the middle of the decade, Toyota are now much more rock solid and have to resort to faking a tyre mistake to let Alonso win.

 

Because they're not being raced and thus don't have to push.

 

:lol:

 

Being new to this (as I've mentioned elsewhere in the thread), conspiracy theories notwithstanding I was wondering why they didn't just change all four tyres at once. Seems obvious, and would have eliminated the possibility of changing the wrong one.

 

Apparently they didn't have any more new tyre sets, and the only available sets had already done four stints on the car. What are the limits on that sort of thing? Is it a budget thing, to reduce the advantage of the works teams who can throw money at it?

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10 minutes ago, beenabadbunny said:

 

:lol:

 

Being new to this (as I've mentioned elsewhere in the thread), conspiracy theories notwithstanding I was wondering why they didn't just change all four tyres at once. Seems obvious, and would have eliminated the possibility of changing the wrong one.

 

Apparently they didn't have any more new tyre sets, and the only available sets had already done four stints on the car. What are the limits on that sort of thing? Is it a budget thing, to reduce the advantage of the works teams who can throw money at it?

 

Yeah, to be clear I don't think it was a conspiracy so much as utter dumbassery.

 

It is indeed a budget thing, as much for the tyre makers as anything else who now have a nice easy fixed number of tyres they have to make and bring.

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Ultimately a budget thing, and the regulations define how many sets of tyres each car can have. There are also other regulations about how many different specifications of tyre to be used and which subset of tyres from the batch supplied by the manufacturer(s) are selected by the officials to be used on which car (to prevent collusion of tyre manufacturer and team).

 

 image.png.3db4ec092c4011de838c5d5b69e17ad4.png

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The amount teams spend on tyres is ridiculous. And that comment is aimed across all formula's, it accounts for an absurd amount of any teams budget.

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Equally though, even if they're not perfect tyres (and 4 stints isn't ruined by any means on an LMP1-H) I still think you're made not to change the set.

 

You can then, at your leisure, check those tyres and maybe use the good ones later.  But right then, when every second counts you put known functional rubber on the thing.

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Good news everyone !! (..thats willing to wait until '22/'23) 

 

Just merge the technical stuff/ regulations with Imsa dpi class and let's have some 'mature' global endurance racing pls. 

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