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Microsoft HoloLens - moar VR/AR


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I know they haven't revealed much, but anyone have a clue how Magic Leap works? They say it projects light onto your retina, but isn't whatever you are reading this on doing exactly that? Is it frickin' lasers? Retinal rastering?

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Agreed. Apparently, someone in the billion dollar idea thread said there's an app to let you view ruins through your phone's camera that display what it was like back in the day. Hyundai have a phone app that let you view your car's engine and see labeling for how to DIY fix stuff. Selfishly, I have my own super secret AR app idea for my Surface, which I'll write one of these days. But basically, the ability to see relevant information en situ just seems brilliant to me.

Plus, it's all very Ghost in the Shell electronic eyes, without the need for an implant, although perhaps that's the logical, dystopian-ish conclusion for this stuff. For VR, end game is probably the holodeck.

I know someone said they wanted that as an app on their phone but I mentioned that it already exists as an AR experience in China, you get special goggles when you get to this viewing platform of these ruins and then you can see them all how they were. Unfortunately the Michio Kaku book I read it in pretty much just skated over it as quickly as that but I'll see if he's got a reference as to where it is and stuff. Sounds very cool I thought.

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I know they haven't revealed much, but anyone have a clue how Magic Leap works? They say it projects light onto your retina, but isn't whatever you are reading this on doing exactly that? Is it frickin' lasers? Retinal rastering?

Magic Leap is way ahead of anything else known to be out there for AR, light-field rendering so 3D polygon objects appear as naturally solid items in your view, no funny eye tricks like VR has to rely on for S3D, which is the same trick as cinema S3D uses. HoloLens is like Google Glass 3.0, Magic Leap is more like Google Glass 12.0

It's meant to use something a bit like the Avegant Glyph for its display technology, direct retinal, no screen like Google Glass/HoloLens use.

http://www.polygon.com/2016/1/8/10738664/the-avegant-glyph-looks-strange-but-its-one-of-the-best-surprises-of

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From Ken Perlin's blog

If you and I are walking around in some future version of everyday reality, and we are wearing those cyber-glasses that visually transform the world around us, we are going to want some other powers as well. And we will get them.

For one thing, I am going to want to point to an object across a room and then see that object float toward me until it ends up in my upturned palm. But that’s not going to happen by itself.

Instead, there will be an army of invisible robots acting as proxies between us and the physical world around us. Most of the time we won’t see these robots.

It’s not that they will be invisible, but rather that there will be no reason to make them look interesting or to make them part of our constructed visual landscape. When we walk across a room they will get out of our way, so there is no particular reason for us to even know they are there, as separate objects.

This idea of things unobtrusively operating on our behalf in the physical world is far from new. The plumbing that brings water to your tap, the restaurant kitchen that you never enter, the engine inside your car, these are but a few examples of things that work on your behalf in the physical world that you do not ordinarily see.

After a while, people won’t even think about the fact that they are always seeing a constructed version of reality. After all, most of us forget that the concrete sidewalks beneath our feet are a constructed reality.

Everyone will simply have the power to make any physical object float through the air and come to them just by pointing at it and issuing verbal commands. This power will come to seem so ordinary that people of the future will wonder how anybody ever got along without it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well if it's possible to accurately darken parts of the lens so it's infocus at the same time as looking 'through' to the realworld I'll be amazed.   I don't *think* they are doing that.

 

The best guess is the whole lens is darkened and they are projecting light onto it.   So everything will be additive to a (perhaps darkened) real world. So, no blacks and nothing projected will ever be darker than what's behind it and never opaque.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, JPickford said:

But they're using actual black in the interface.  How will that work?  Assuming this does project the imagine on the glass or is it something different?

 

 

 

I think you're understanding it correctly, it's like Google Glass in that it projects an image onto some glass in front of your eyes. Anything "black" should simply appear as completely transparent with respect to real life which is something MS could easily emulate in the video compositing but aren't doing. 

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I suppose I'm suggesting it's even more fake than not correctly compositing.   Because that interface uses black elements to create a canvas for the menus/icons.   That's the reverse of what you would actually do.   You'd create a bright area and cut into it with darker icons.

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1 minute ago, JPickford said:

I suppose I'm suggesting it's even more fake than not correctly compositing.   Because that interface uses black elements to create a canvas for the menus/icons.   That's the reverse of what you would actually do.   You'd create a bright area and cut into it with darker icons.

 

Yeah, I'm really inclined to think that this isn't the real interface because it just wouldn't work with the real screen. They'll be developing apps using some ordinary LCD instead and an interface intended for those, and it'll have to change.

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I decided to simulate how it would look in real life using some screengrabs of the interface from the video and the "lighten only" layer mode in GIMP. Then I turned up the contrast on those layers all the way because otherwise you couldn't see shit.

 

 

lightenonly.jpg

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Well, this is one app, so the app's interface is shit, not HoloLens'.

 

Here's a more interesting story:

 

Quote

When its mixed reality headset was first announced, Microsoft touted its ability to lend a hand in a variety of enterprise scenarios. The company teamed up with NASA for Sidekick: a project that is putting HoloLens on the International Space Station to give virtual aid to astronauts. The project uses the tech in two ways to offer support a crew member wouldn't ordinarily have while completing a task. First, Remote Expert Mode uses Skype to give someone on the ground a view of exactly what the astronaut is seeing. From there, a colleague can remotely guide the task or scribble notes and drawings in the astronaut's view -- all in real time. A Procedure Mode overlays animated holographic illustrations on top of real objects for reference. Not only could this cut down on training time, but it could provide a valuable guide in situations plagued by communication delays.

 

http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/25/nasa-microsoft-hololens-sidekick-iss/

 

Which sounds superb, and we'll all wonder how we did without it. But crappy blacks, etc.

 

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2 minutes ago, footle said:

John: Why is it that *no-one* who's used it has moaned about (or even mentioned) the black levels? Have you actually got a source?

 

Just my own thinking and attempts to understand what's going on.

 

Happy to be proven wrong.   I'm not though. :)

 

Alex's mock-up above is what I think it must look like in reality.   And that 'additive only' thing isn't just about the interface - it's also how the 'holograms' will look.

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8 minutes ago, JPickford said:

 

Just my own thinking and attempts to understand what's going on.

 

Happy to be proven wrong.   I'm not though. :)

 

Alex's mock-up above is what I think it must look like in reality.   And that 'additive only' thing isn't just about the interface - it's also how the 'holograms' will look.

 

It's the fact that no-one who's tried it has mentioned it, but it's stated in here as an obvious fact.

Given that the people who've tried it *will* be aware of additive light, I don't see why it's not been mentioned?

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It's a given fact?  Ok. If you like.  I haven't spoken to everyone who's used it.

 

If they're projecting black (and by that I mean darkening reality somehow - not just solid black) then they have a new form of tech that's more impressive than AR.  

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