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Whiplash - a film about drumming


smithstock
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Absolutely tremendous, this. By turns tense and exhilarating, with two superb central performances - Simmons is rightly getting plaudits (and should surely walk the Best Supporting Actor category) but I thought Teller was really good, too. And incredibly lean - it's good to see a film that doesn't feel 15-20 minutes too long. Builds to a crescendo then BANG! It's over.

Probably my favourite of the Oscar contenders I've seen so far, though I've still got three of the Best Picture nominees yet to watch.

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My mother downloads all of the threads and posts them to me, so I have to reply a month in advance, no one seems to note the complete lack of context.

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Dreadful movie, if you know anything about jazz the whole concept of going to a conservatory school to learn how to play jazz by a score (lol), and directed by a conductor (!) is ludicrous. And don't get me started on the whole "you need to suffer and bleed if you want to be great" - that level of effort will at best turn you into Salieri, never a Mozart.

What I found worse was

the whole Stockholm Syndrome thing. The movie lost me when he decided to go back and join the music teacher's band, after all he'd been put through. Like watching the victim of domestic abuse go back to her abuser.

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I know nothing about jazz, music schools or what you need to do to be a great musician. Actually I dislike jazz most of the time.

This was a brilliant film because of the story and the acting. And I think you misunderstood the film if you think he had Stockhausen Syndrome, the ending showed his individuality triumph not conform to what the band leader wanted.

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I know nothing about jazz, music schools or what you need to do to be a great musician. Actually I dislike jazz most of the time.

This was a brilliant film because of the story and the acting. And I think you misunderstood the film if you think he had Stockhausen Syndrome, the ending showed his individuality triumph not conform to what the band leader wanted.

How did he not conform to it? The psychopath wanted him to grow through self-abuse, and that's what he "did". I don't think Charlie Parker, or Louis Armstrong, or anyone that's great at art got there by abusing themselves. There is no joy in his drumming, he doesn't play because he has to, but because he "wants to be great". That's bs, and it's a dangerous modern trope that costs lives. Psychopathic bullies aren't the gateway to greatness, they're just bullies.

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Eh, the ending effectively justified what an utter arsehole Schillinger had been the whole film/his whole career. He even told drummer boy why he was such an arsehole and he still came back for more of the same. He was lucky he didn't get nailed to the floor of the gym.

So driving potential candidates to suicide is a worthy price for an entire career where one - ONE - candidate exceeds the expectations of a top performing arts college? If he'd spent his lessons reading a newspaper, the law of averages still says he'd get one or two greats over the course of his career.

Also, does having scarred hands make you a better drummer? I don't know a lot about drumming, but I know that bleeding hands and scars would make you a worse player of just about every single classical instrument.

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You didn't enjoy it - fair enough. Horses for courses and all

Reading through the thread, most people do like it and enjoyed it as a piece of entertainment without looking into it too much - I'm very much in that camp, it's one of the best films I've seen in a while.

I enjoyed Jurassic Park, and it didn't annoy me in the slightest that the dinosaurs were the wrong colours, nor did it spoil my enjoyment of the film.

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I mean, apart from his absurd jazz comments (I tried to find a video of The Simpsons where Bart complains about an Itchy & Scratchy episode that used the wrong pegs for pitching a tent), his complaints seem to be about the characters and their beliefs and actions. Which is how films work.

GUY THINKS BEING A BASTARD WILL DEVELOP TALENT, WHAT AN IDIOT. SHIT FILM.

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Nah, my main problem with it is it endorses the idea that if you want to be great, you need to endure bullying because it will propel you to a shining future. Which is dangerous, as many people do put up with bullying and when asking friends what they should do are often told "well, what do you want? just stick it out and come out the other end".

Bullying is just bullying, it doesn't make anyone great. Did Charlie Parker play the sax until his lips bled? Did he f*ck... He did practice many, many hours a day, but you only endure that because you enjoy it, not because it will "make you great".

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I don't think it endorses that at all. I can't imagine anyone walking away from that film thinking 'This is what I need to do to suceed.'.

For me it was their totally messed up relationship that made the film so enjoyable. I certainly don't agree with the way he acted, but their back and forth was so compelling.

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It wasn't a documentary, shesaid.

I hope you get as angry about other films. I imagine you can't watch 'Rocky' for the sheer madness that is Stallone taking about 60 billions punches to the face, just to wear down his opponent.

Some movies do wind me up like this one.. Rocky is different because he doesn't actually win, does he? I've got no problem with most of the acting in Whiplash - I think Tenner (?) was incredibly convincing and threatening. What I object to is the message - that greatness demands bleeding knuckles and putting up with bullies. It clearly doesn't, if you take one look around at some great artists, or athletes, etc.

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