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The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask 3DS


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I cancelled my XL Ltd edition after I saw it in the flesh, the gold just didn't do it for me. I picked up a black new 3ds XL and Majoras yesterday, the new 3DS is excellent (the 3D actually works now!) and Majoras is as strange and beguiling as I remember.

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There's always been something about N64 graphics that appeals to me and these 3DS ports do a great job of removing the obvious (fuzzy, foggy) drawbacks of them. MM3D looks much better than Skywards Sword and Twilight Princess. Puts their gameplay to shame too, obviously.

I'm kinda missing the more garish elements of the original's colour palette so far, mind.

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Mine should arrive today from Nintendo. Problem is I don't really fancy playing it on my old 3ds. Would much rather play on a new 3ds xl.

I've had a little go on it via my old 3DS XL, not being able to move the controller is really bothering me, might wait till the cart arrives so I can play it on the n3DS.

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Move the camera? Yeah forgot about that. I do have the controller pro thing for my 3ds though. My copy has turned up now in any case.

Yeah, you know what I meant to type :P

Never saw the need to own a CPP, but while I (im) patiently wait for my MMXL with game to arrive, I'll have to settle for standard controls.

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Move the camera? IDGI, the original just had the one true camera control - Z targeting. No other camera adjustments should be necessary.

Yep, but despite owning 3 copies of the original, I have only ever played a few hours of it, via emulation. And when the 360's N64 emu decided it wanted to glitch at a certain point, and never go any further, I gave up.

Playing it yesterday, all I wanted to do was move the viewing angle about with a "c" stick to make it easier to get around the world.

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Grrrr! You people! One of the joys of the N64 originals is that they didn't take you out of the game by making you a camera operator.

Controlling the camera with a second stick doesn't take you out of the game any more than using the L button to centre the camera behind you. How you can regard having less control in a video game as a 'joy' is unfathomable to this player. Surreal giant deku scrubs chasing you into the screen - a joy. Paper-munching toilet hand - a joy. Skullkid curiously blowing ocarina and giggling - a joy. Not being able to move the camera ... a joy? Unfathomable, I say, unless this is another post from middle-aged rllmuk, fumbling over all these unnecessary inputs when all you needed in 1987 were two little buttons and a d-pad.

You realise you don't have to use it anyway, right? L-targeting is still there. Just ignore the camera controls that vastly improve the game for almost every person playing it, and enjoy the nostalgia of cripplevision. Perhaps smear a tub of vaseline all over your 3DS screen while you're at it.

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playing this on a bog standard 3ds xl (no funds for a new 3ds at the mo) although at least it's a zelda limited edition one.

Looks and plays amazingly well. I must have started the game 4 times over the years but have never finished it. This time I will make it to the end...

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Controlling the camera with a second stick doesn't take you out of the game any more than using the L button to centre the camera behind you. How you can regard having less control in a video game as a 'joy' is unfathomable to this player. Surreal giant deku scrubs chasing you into the screen - a joy. Paper-munching toilet hand - a joy. Skullkid curiously blowing ocarina and giggling - a joy. Not being able to move the camera ... a joy? Unfathomable, I say, unless this is another post from middle-aged rllmuk, fumbling over all these unnecessary inputs when all you needed in 1987 were two little buttons and a d-pad.

You realise you don't have to use it anyway, right? L-targeting is still there. Just ignore the camera controls that vastly improve the game for almost every person playing it, and enjoy the nostalgia of cripplevision. Perhaps smear a tub of vaseline all over your 3DS screen while you're at it.

Glossing over the needlessly dickish tone of your post, yes, the original Z camera centering (along with the controls generally) was a huge joy in the original two N64 games. It's not about "less control", it's about freeing the player from having to "direct" the action, and just letting them play the game. The auto-jump was the same sort of innovation. As soon as you give the player camera controls to tinker with, they'll tinker with them. Suddenly you're not Link, running about and slashing grass, you're the game designers, fiddling with the framing.

The Z-lock centering was perfect, because unlike fiddling with a second stick ("Left a bit. Now up. Maybe I'll zoom out. No, that's not it..." etc) it's totally instinctive. It's like it's the root to the analogue stick, both controls easily and naturally falling under your finger and thumb respectively. You don't even think about it after, oooh, 30 seconds of playing the game, whereas manual camera controls never fade into the background in the same way. I'm always conscious of them.

As to the optional nature of the camera controls, fine - but I just know I'll be tempted to tinker with them. Wind Waker was like that. Maybe I'll gaffer tape over it or something...

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