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rllmuk
strider

The Great British Bird Hunt

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It was in the reviews section. no idea why it is now here.

I've just spent most of the evening reading this. Thank you for taking the time to write it.

Thanks, it's appreciated :)

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Has this always been in the Gaming / Discussion folder, or has it been blown off course during migration?

I'm glad it did, as I wouldn't have seen it otherwise. My boy's absolutely crazy about birds and I'm sure he'll love this. Good work, strider.

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This is really great. I wouldn't have seen it without it being moved either.

Since becoming self-employed a year or so ago I've taken daily walks through the parks in Leamington, and I'm slowly adding a few less-common birds to my personal list. So in that time I've had a single sighting each of a blackcap, a tree creeper, and (I think) a goldcrest (only a few days ago this one), I've seen a greater-spotted woodpecker twice, had some great heron sightings, and I found out where some nuthatches live (love these little guys).

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This is really great. I wouldn't have seen it without it being moved either.

Since becoming self-employed a year or so ago I've taken daily walks through the parks in Leamington, and I'm slowly adding a few less-common birds to my personal list. So in that time I've had a single sighting each of a blackcap, a tree creeper, and (I think) a goldcrest (only a few days ago this one), I've seen a greater-spotted woodpecker twice, had some great heron sightings, and I found out where some nuthatches live (love these little guys).

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Excellent stuff, I've yet to see a blackcap that stayed around long enough to take a photo of. They are apparently susceptible to pishing, so I may try that.

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Blackcap has a lovely, distinctive melodic song which is softer and more tuneful/chattery than the familar blackbird and robin's songs that you hear all year around. It's also more consistent than the above two, who sometimes improvise. Worth giving it a listen - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLkBVToXR9I - as the birds are flooding into the UK atm so this song will be everywhere soon. Once you hear and spot one in "the wild" it'll be embedded into your brain for ever more.

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Agreed Jamin, I've been practicing my bird calls (picked up a decent CD a month or so back) which is making it a lot easier to locate rarer things I've not seen yet.

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Lovely photos again - particularly like the magpie (amazing colour in that).

After my last post where I suspected I'd seen my first goldcrest I've now seen dozens of them - including one encounter where I watched a group of fledglings being fed by their parents, whilst two more had a squabble on the path six feet away. They've quickly become a favourite - they're soooo tiny, constantly active, and couldn't care less about someone watching them. I also love the whistly chattering noise they sometimes make - and that's partly why I've seen them so often.

This spring has been fantastic - mainly because I've kept my ears open a bit more. Along with the goldcrests I've seen families of blackcaps, nuthatches, goldfinches, long-tailed tits, coal tits, wrens and more. The wren chicks were brilliant, I watched them for some time practising their flying - a blur of stubby wings that just about kept them airborne. I also saw my first pair of bullfinches - beautiful birds.

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It's amazing what you noticed when you start paying attention or opening your ears like you've said. I've still not see any black caps yet, so will try to get down to hengistbury head this weekend. I'm due another trip to longham lakes too.

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Yep - paying attention is perhaps a better way of phrasing it. I rarely wear headphones when I'm out (Test Match Special is the exception, and even then I leave one ear free). So I've probably been hearing all the cues before on my daily walks, but not actually picking up on them. Almost all the good stuff this year has been heard first, seen later (the families of nuthatches and goldcrests were properly noisy too - constantly chattering to each other). I'm a bit of a novice at identifying bird calls, but I know a few of the commonest (robin, blackbird, goldfinch and a few others), and simply watching and waiting for a minute or two when I hear something that's not one of these has paid dividends.

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Bird calls are tremendously tricky but certainly a great way of identifying more unusual birds. Jamin occassionally pops into the thread and he certainly jnows his stuff. I picked up a cd by collins and am using that as a guide.

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Just found this thread after someone mentioned it in one of the Retro Game threads… Really enjoying it, only at Week 10 or so. Will take a while to catch up.

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