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I've not been out since last October. I think this year I'm going to concentrate on taking the best possible shots of birds at my local patch. It's not going to be easy as there are no hides, viewing points or anything else so I'm going to have to try good old-fashioned fieldcraft. Last year I saw around 85 birds there but only really took images of half of them so I've got plenty of improving to do. The great thing about photography is that you can almost always get that one better shot.

Here's what I have so far.

Hmm it won't link to all the images. Bugger.

 

 

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47 minutes ago, strider said:

I've not been out since last October. I think this year I'm going to concentrate on taking the best possible shots of birds at my local patch. It's not going to be easy as there are no hides, viewing points or anything else so I'm going to have to try good old-fashioned fieldcraft. Last year I saw around 85 birds there but only really took images of half of them so I've got plenty of improving to do. The great thing about photography is that you can almost always get that one better shot.

Here's what I have so far.

Hmm it won't link to all the images. Bugger.

 

 

 

lovely capture, how far away where you?

 

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In this example I was probably about 17 feet away with my 400mm lens. I was actually able to get right up near a grill and it was completely unfazed by me. Once I walked around the other side of the lake it got chased off by Black-Headed Gulls.

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16 minutes ago, strider said:

In this example I was probably about 17 feet away with my 400mm lens. I was actually able to get right up near a grill and it was completely unfazed by me. Once I walked around the other side of the lake it got chased off by Black-Headed Gulls.

 

Your doing it wrong, link 200 more pics that are blurry and really dark 

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On 2/17/2018 at 18:01, Loik V credern said:

how_does_david_cameron_sleep_at_night_by

 

 

This and all the others look EXACTLY the same. It just looks like a 30 minute walk up town, randomly swinging a point and press camera around with your finger on the trigger rattling off hundreds of dreary average pictures. 

Then loading the whole lot into lightroom and without looking at what's there, hitting the "turn this into the most pretentious or pretentious art" preset and sitting back to watch the little red line creep up to 100%.

 

The Law of diminishing returns means every now and again there is something brilliant, amazing, moving and genuinely startling.  But there is so much dross to wade through that those gems get lost in drab over processed 5th year art project pretentiousness. The style of these shots has not changed one iota since they were first ushered onto the Rllmuk stage all those years ago. When we had the exact same complaints then. Too many, no quality control and just so samey.

 

Sure, we all have a style, and one particular subject we return to time and again. But we try to distil down what attracts us to those subject to move forward and find new ways to look and capture those moments. Not just turn up the contrast higher and higher. 

 

I've never liked these pictures and i doubt i ever will. To me it's the very worst of over processing and directionless meandering street photography. 

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I'm a bit confused. There's quite a degree of difference between 'something brilliant, amazing, moving and genuinely startling' and 'drab over processed 5th year art project pretentiousness'.

 

How am I supposed to know which photos are the former and which are the latter? Is it even possible? I don't even know how 'law of diminishing returns' applies to the words that follow. Is that sentence for someone else?

 

 

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9 hours ago, Loik V credern said:

I'm a bit confused. There's quite a degree of difference between 'something brilliant, amazing, moving and genuinely startling' and 'drab over processed 5th year art project pretentiousness'.

 

How am I supposed to know which photos are the former and which are the latter? Is it even possible? I don't even know how 'law of diminishing returns' applies to the words that follow. Is that sentence for someone else?

 

 

 

It's one of the basic photography skills that you learn. Through experience, having your work evaluated by others, and by looking at other peoples work.

Are you on Instagram ? Put your stuff up on Instagram and engage with the street photography community on there. It'll be a learning experience.

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16 hours ago, strider said:

I've not been out since last October. I think this year I'm going to concentrate on taking the best possible shots of birds at my local patch. It's not going to be easy as there are no hides, viewing points or anything else so I'm going to have to try good old-fashioned fieldcraft. Last year I saw around 85 birds there but only really took images of half of them so I've got plenty of improving to do. The great thing about photography is that you can almost always get that one better shot.

Here's what I have so far.

Hmm it won't link to all the images. Bugger.

 

This is something that I've picked up whilst I've been at camera club when it comes down to bird photography. There seems to be two types of bird photography "record shots" where you're just recording the fact that you've seen a specific bird and "competition photography", this differs in so much that the people judging these images are looking for something that tells a story...  I've sat through hundreds and hundreds of competition shots of birds and I get what they mean now... hell, I've entered bird shots that I thought were really good... perfectly in focus, no distracting backgrounds, cracking lighting, yet got average marks for them.... and the judges were right!  If you look at any of the top class bird photos they will all be technically perfect... but in addition they will actually be doing something.

 

So take your bird shot here, technically its perfect, its sharp and in focus and there are no blown highlights, you can see all the textures in the feathers etc.. spot on... one of the feet is obscured but that's what it was like. But as a photograph its a bit dull. 

 

Now imagine if the bird had its mouth open and was singing/squawking  (i.e doing something), the photo would then be telling a story... as a viewer i'd be able to imagine the sound coming from the bird...I'm sure if you go through your favourite shots that you've taken you'll probably see that the ones that stand out are the ones with the bird doing something and not just being another "bird on a stick". That's not a derogatory term by the way, it's a phrase I've heard over the past couple of years used by national standard judges when they compare multiple bird shots...

 

Hopefully this has come across as useful criticism and not having a pop as that's not my intention... you've mastered the technical aspect of bird photography, you just need to work on the artistic side a little.

 

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2 minutes ago, PopeSmokesDope said:

 

This is something that I've picked up whilst I've been at camera club when it comes down to bird photography. There seems to be two types of bird photography "record shots" where you're just recording the fact that you've seen a specific bird and "competition photography", this differs in so much that the people judging these images are looking for something that tells a story...  I've sat through hundreds and hundreds of competition shots of birds and I get what they mean now... hell, I've entered bird shots that I thought were really good... perfectly in focus, no distracting backgrounds, cracking lighting, yet got average marks for them.... and the judges were right!  If you look at any of the top class bird photos they will all be technically perfect... but in addition they will actually be doing something.

 

So take your bird shot here, technically its perfect, its sharp and in focus and there are no blown highlights, you can see all the textures in the feathers etc.. spot on... one of the feet is obscured but that's what it was like. But as a photograph its a bit dull. 

 

Now imagine if the bird had its mouth open and was singing/squawking  (i.e doing something), the photo would then be telling a story... as a viewer i'd be able to imagine the sound coming from the bird...I'm sure if you go through your favourite shots that you've taken you'll probably see that the ones that stand out are the ones with the bird doing something and not just being another "bird on a stick". That's not a derogatory term by the way, it's a phrase I've heard over the past couple of years used by national standard judges when they compare multiple bird shots...

 

Hopefully this has come across as useful criticism and not having a pop as that's not my intention... you've mastered the technical aspect of bird photography, you just need to work on the artistic side a little.

 

Mate I work in games journalism I'm able to take knocks to my ego :P

I'd never dream of entering my work in a competition because I don't think it's good enough, although I appreciate you feel the gull is a nice technical shot (annoyingly the link I've posted doesn't go to the other images in the file). It's definitely a bird on a stick, but this one is stupidly rare (it was blown across from the US) and it wasn't doing much other sitting around looking exhausted. I totally agree with you that it's not a particularly interesting looking photo and that's the sort of stuff I'm going to try and improve on going forward. I tend to find as well personally that even a poor quality image will get a lot of interest if the actual bird within it is doing something interesting.

 

For me, I love criticism in my photos as it's the only way you can improve. Too many of the facebook groups I go on are rubbish, instantly liking shit shots of kingfishers and owls because they are kingfishers and owls. I've a lot of respect for your work so you taking the time to comment on mine is appreciated.

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Yeah.... since I’ve joined a camera club I feel that having my work judged by someone impartial  and commenting on my shots has helped me massively... that said some of the judges don’t actually give that much constructive criticism and that’s quite annoying when you sit there hearing them say “it’s a great shot... I love how this works, such and such, technically it’s perfect .... 8/10” and not actually telling you why they’ve knocked 2 Marks off 

 

some of your stuff is good enough for competition.

 

oh and I agree on the fecking kingfisher shots.... most of the really good ones are staged anyway.... which seems like cheating to me!

 

I remember we had this one talk from this Lady...It had some of the most stunning bird photography I've ever seen... eagles coming in for prey in the snow, all utterly fantastic stuff....I should have twigged when the first shot was a picture of a big yacht and she casuallyualy dropped in "Oh this is a picture of my boat..." as we went through the images she was reeling off "THis was taken with my 1D and 600mm lens, this one with my 5d and 400m lens..." I was totting up the gear and I reckon she had 40-50k's worth of kit... anyway, it turns out all of these stunning shots had been on workshops where they put bait out and know that the birds will show up... now if she'd had tracked through the wilderness for 4 hours and sat waiting for something to show up for another 4 hours then i'd have been congratulating her... but the fact she casually drops in "this was in such and suchs back garden in Norway, he's built a hide there and baits them...and you sit for 20 minutes and they show up whilst you're drinking your hot tea"  kinda makes a mockery of everyone who earns their fieldcraft... anyone of us in that room could probably have taken those same photos with her kit and it all laid out on a plate for you.

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14 minutes ago, PopeSmokesDope said:

Yeah.... since I’ve joined a camera club I feel that having my work judged by someone impartial  and commenting on my shots has helped me massively... that said some of the judges don’t actually give that much constructive criticism and that’s quite annoying when you sit there hearing them say “it’s a great shot... I love how this works, such and such, technically it’s perfect .... 8/10” and not actually telling you why they’ve knocked 2 Marks off 

 

some of your stuff is good enough for competition.

 

oh and I agree on the fecking kingfisher shots.... most of the really good ones are staged anyway.... which seems like cheating to me!

 

I remember we had this one talk from this Lady...It had some of the most stunning bird photography I've ever seen... eagles coming in for prey in the snow, all utterly fantastic stuff....I should have twigged when the first shot was a picture of a big yacht and she casuallyualy dropped in "Oh this is a picture of my boat..." as we went through the images she was reeling off "THis was taken with my 1D and 600mm lens, this one with my 5d and 400m lens..." I was totting up the gear and I reckon she had 40-50k's worth of kit... anyway, it turns out all of these stunning shots had been on workshops where they put bait out and know that the birds will show up... now if she'd had tracked through the wilderness for 4 hours and sat waiting for something to show up for another 4 hours then i'd have been congratulating her... but the fact she casually drops in "this was in such and suchs back garden in Norway, he's built a hide there and baits them...and you sit for 20 minutes and they show up whilst you're drinking your hot tea"  kinda makes a mockery of everyone who earns their fieldcraft... anyone of us in that room could probably have taken those same photos with her kit and it all laid out on a plate for you.

It's nice you think some of it it good enough for competition, maybe I should enter some stuff this year…

 

I agree with you about baiting and workshops. There's a guy I know who takes fantastic photos, but he uses recorded calls and all sorts in order to draw birds in closer to him. I've taken plenty of shots from non-paying hides like Blashford but I've never lured a bird in in order to take a shot I just don't think it's very ethical. Most people I know always go out with mealworms in their pockets and I've lost count of the fake drinking hole sights I see with impossibly arranged pieces of wood and plants.

 

A lot of my shots are weak because Longham isn't really a great place for getting up close and personal but I still try.

This wagtail suffers as it's a heavy crop, but I think it's the sort of interesting shot you've mentioned.

18626446654_4921338703_b.jpgUntitled by Darran Jones, on Flickr

 

These young coots were playing with each other. I was on my belly about 25 feet away for this one.

36410266135_151282960d_h.jpgBaby Coots by Darran Jones, on Flickr

 

Another belly shot, this time in the car park. I know it's effectively a bird on a stick but I do like the pose on this one.

King of the hill

 

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@PopeSmokesDope and @strider

 

I think the technical perfection at the expense of art stems from gear heads and camera clubs where photos are judged by pixel peeping and blown highlights. It's not exclusive to birding either, see plenty of examples of this in landscape also.

 

One of my favourite bird photos is the one that adorns Michael Kenna's Holga book, which I guess is the polar opposite of the more techinical/gear head photos

 

 holga_tpgbookshop_01_300x300.jpg?v=15120

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I'm always torn on blurred wings. I get that it gives a better indication of movement, but I think it's a really difficult thing to get right.

Glad the birds are getting some love though, I love bird photography and have been gutted I've been unable to get out this year so far.

I find bird photography ridiculously challenging because you've got so little control over your subjects but when it all comes together it really does make the long hours and early starts worth it.

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2 hours ago, Ste_S said:

@PopeSmokesDope and @strider

 

I think the technical perfection at the expense of art stems from gear heads and camera clubs where photos are judged by pixel peeping and blown highlights. It's not exclusive to birding either, see plenty of examples of this in landscape also.

 

 

Yeah, and I can see where Judges are coming from in that respect. I've sat there and looked at an assessment and there have been times where there have been 8 bird shots. If they are all "bird on a stick" shots the only thing a judge can do is judge them on the technical merits, as artistically speaking , unless they're doing something interesting they're all identical, regardless of whether its  a blue t1t or bald eagle.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Ste_S said:

It's one of the basic photography skills that you learn. Through experience, having your work evaluated by others, and by looking at other peoples work.

 

Are you on Instagram ? Put your stuff up on Instagram and engage with the street photography community on there. It'll be a learning experience.

 

I joined Instagram to upload iPhone photos but it wasn't flexible in terms of editing and deleting, they were appearing lighter than how they were on my phone and just getting them off there in edited form was a pain, so I stopped. There are plenty of iPhone instagram photographers I love, koci, alberstam, although they, koci especially reduce people to their minimal form too, and he's got into a rut of only capturing man wearing hat in overly blurry poetic photo rather than going simple and candid.

 

It's bizarre to think of the editing process as this additional thing rather than at the core of the whole pursuit,  as though I'd throw one out and that would be it, harsh black and white done there, let's avoid that now. This is probably the crux; it's not 'adopted', to transform is the magic. If I do colour, it'd be to push it to saturated extremes too. There are endless ways to capture someone stood by a wall. My photos are my own journey, I kind of value them all, each one which works in that instant. When I make a book, I keep them in, I know in terms of them being the best attempt of girl with umbrella in rain they're not great. I don't care to put them out there to be judged by people who do not remotely share the same desire as me. That's not the point. The value is they're my expression through the medium. Same way as Moriyama's books is a personal travel journey, he has plenty of ordinary shots of ordinary things that make up the world he's creating. The value is this guy has lived and breathed photography for 40 years, let go of your weird critical faculties and submerge yourself in the purity of his vision. 

 

It's hilarious to me to think of my stuff in relation to your post because of the patronising language. I'm not sure how it's possible I could do so much with extremely consistent intentions and it be assumed I don't know what I'm doing, that I don't know about past photography or current photography, or street or art in general, and have not seen anything else.

 

I know my stuff is good in terms of what it is because I like it and nearly everything bores me. It doesn't make sense to assume I'm going to bow down to the tastes of others. If you only do boring photography of cars and trees and fiercely dislike my stuff, I'm not really going to think; he has a point. I'm going to think; well you don't share my desire and sense of satisfaction for tones, shapes, negative space. If you do outstanding street photography and fiercely dislike my stuff it still doesn't change anything, it's my own enjoyment of it, my own excitement. To upload is to share the excitement, it's not I Think This Is A Great Photo when it's a couple walking across a bridge. 

 

The people I like on Instagram who do street just do it. Some shots are better than others. The praise varies. Some people like different ones more. 'Thanks so much for showing your stuff!' is the common comment. It's not; 'I think you should never have shown this to the world because I, with my superior knowledge of all things art deem it to be 5th year pretentious art dross. The other one you put up yesterday was startling though, hope u take on my advice and learn a thing or two.' 

 

Not that I can't improve and learn, don't make mistakes, regret misses, just that that is not part of the discussion. That is for the photography alone to chase his desire. This is street as personal expression as opposed to placing it on a platform to be judged based on accepted criteria of professional quality. I don't care for that, at all. There is not one person whose opinion means anything to me, because it's not about them. I did it because it excited me.

 

What I meant to say was, sidewaysbob could have picked out shots he thought were pointless that others thought were good, could gave picked out shots he despised that I loved. There's no consensus. 

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...and I wondered why I bothered engaging.

 

9 minutes ago, Loik V credern said:

I know my stuff is good in terms of what it is because I like it and nearly everything bores me

 

I'm glad you like your stuff.

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16 minutes ago, Ste_S said:

...and I wondered why I bothered engaging.

 

 

I'm glad you like your stuff.

 

You aren't engaging though. This is typical rllmuk; write loads, have one line picked out. A line of many that was added to further elaborate the point. Which is: that it doesn't matter. Really, please actually read the clear points. 

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I did.

 

You asked

 



I'm a bit confused. There's quite a degree of difference between 'something brilliant, amazing, moving and genuinely startling' and 'drab over processed 5th year art project pretentiousness'.

 

How am I supposed to know which photos are the former and which are the latter? Is it even possible?

 

I replied in good faith

 



It's one of the basic photography skills that you learn. Through experience, having your work evaluated by others, and by looking at other peoples work.

Are you on Instagram ? Put your stuff up on Instagram and engage with the street photography community on there. It'll be a learning experience.

 

Which you called patronising.

 

*Shrugs* I don't know what's to gain by further engaging with you because as you say

 

51 minutes ago, Loik V credern said:

There is not one person whose opinion means anything to me, because it's not about them. I did it because it excited me.

 

Anything I type will be irrelevant to you. As I said earlier, I'm glad you like your photos.

 

 

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On 1/21/2018 at 02:15, Dimahoo said:

(...)

I really should have taken a lightweight tripod but i don't like to set up in the middle of London, esp. when busy. I always limit my ISO to 1600 and then try my best to keep my shot steady (certainly on my Sigma 35mm) - Its an F1.4 by thats academic with most of my shots as they're not close ups.

When I have to handhold with low shutter speeds, I often use the Exposure delay mode on my Nikon (other cameras may have something similar, otherwise it's basically just a short self-timer) - means that the camera flips the mirror, then waits a second before it actually takes the picture. Helps make sure that the act of pressing the button doesn't induce too much shake to the camera...

 

On 2/18/2018 at 15:35, Loik V credern said:

I..just can't believe it. All this time? ALLLLLL this time? I've put up like a 1000 photos (...)

I like your photos! Sure, some are better than others, and the amount posted on the last pages was maybe a bit too much for one go, but the style is instantly recognizable, the mood they create from what I presume are more or less every-day scenes is definitely unsettling, and once and again there's a really stand-out shot too. Photography is an art-form, and even though most people in here (including myself) mostly try to show the world more or less than it is, I really appreciate how it can also be used to transform something from one thing into something entirely different.

 

In any case - pictures! Haven't had much time to go out with my camera lately, but had a look through my backlog from last year, and found a few decent ones that I never got around to do anything with before now...

 

LR-Web-1566.jpg

2017 - the lost pictures

 

LR-Web-1573.jpg

2017 - the lost pictures

 

LR-Web-8285.jpg

2017 - the lost pictures

 

LR-Web-8676.jpg

2017 - the lost pictures

 

LR-Web-8714.jpg

2017 - the lost pictures (yes, it's a beach... sorry ;) )

 

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5 hours ago, Ste_S said:

I've got to say @FishyFish you seemed to have stepped up a notch recently with your landscape photos

 

Some strong photos from @sonicwave too

 

 

 

Thanks Ste. I've been watching Thomas Heaton videos lately and I just got the urge to do some landscape stuff. I'm still taking plenty of photos of smashed up buildings and the detritus of human existence though. Gotta keep it balanced. :D

 

And just to prove the point...

 

Pentax P30T,  Rikenon 50mm f/2 & polariser & Kodak Tmax 400.

40480877491_4b2d76f649_b.jpg

FILM - Birch trees by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr

 

Canon Sure Shot Telemax & Kodak Tri-X

39564714515_6e8c97474a_c.jpg

FILM - The unbridled power of photography by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr

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I'm going to put a few more up in a day or two, but thoughts on this one? 

 

38691511590_a785a6a9c5_h.jpgI really must come back here in the spring. by Nayson, on Flickr

 

I was just out for a walk this morning and I stumbled upon the place. It's not really obscure I guess, but seems like a spot where you could take a fantastic photo with the right light and composition (and maybe some leaves or blossom on the trees). I only really had time to take a snap, it was bitterly cold, in fact it was snowing five minutes earlier, but I'm going back there in a month or so. 

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20 hours ago, Naysonymous said:

thoughts on this one? 

 

I like the colours and shape of the flower sellers building, however for the minimalist in me there's too much going on around it. I think you know this, it looks as though you've done some work in post on the building to make it stand out ?

 

For my own personal taste I'd probably try some detail shots and see if you can frame it against a cleaner background. Or perhaps just a tighter composition

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