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No Man's Sky - VR Mode Announced

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For guys who want a procedural generation based space/planet exploration game SOON, one of the ex elder scrolls/bethesda devs has been making the following indie game called RODINA. It doesn't look great graphics wise, but will release on a pay what you want model and could be excellent scope/modding wise, it is out Dec 13th:

Here is what our very own rudderless says about it:

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could walk on the planets? That’s the question that inspired former Bethesda programmer Brendan Anthony to develop this space-exploration RPG. In Rodina, you can gad about the galaxy in your swanky ship, then guide it down through a planet’s atmosphere, land it, and take a stroll through its procedural landscapes - and all without so much as a hint of a loading screen or cutaway. Inspired by the likes of Freelancer and the Elder Scrolls games, it’s got some surprisingly arcadey combat, though you can use more devious methods to deal with rivals, hacking computers to incapacitate them with toxic gas, for example. It’s due out within “a few months” and will adopt a tiered payment model, a la Kickstarter. Find out more in our interview with Rodina's creator

http://www.pcgamer.com/gallery/14-space-games-you-should-be-excited-about-right-now/Rodina/

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Looks amazing, but insanely ambitious for a team of 4. Still, they have the pedigree so I'm cautiously optimistic that they can pull this off. It'll be a big reality check for the mega teams of hundreds of people if they do.

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I also found the guy totally humble and really into his work. I actually felt a bit sorry when he said he sold his house for Joe Danger.

I absolutely will support these guys no matter what.

It also says a lot about their character that they still haven't kickstarted the project, when the Brabens and the Molyneuxes of the world have already done so.

I hope they go to kickstarter with this now.

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Looks utterly fantastic and beautiful. Loved the references he gave when he spoke of what he thought of as sci-fi. Really looking forward to it bringing some wonder and awe back to the genre.

Good luck to them. :)

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I hope this doesnt pull an X-Rebirth on us, ie. look amazing in trailers, wind up a buggy broken shambles. Cause that looks damn good. I couldnt tell you the last time i played a good space exploration game, really hope this turns out to be the space game i always wanted

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1080p version:

Loving the ship design. Proper 70s sci-fi stuff.

Anyone know what the music is?

Weird, because that’s the one thing I don’t like about it – I don’t like the ship designs at all. It seems almost churlish to say so, because it’s basically the game a ten year-old in 1991 would pretend that he’d played on a holiday to America - only it’s actually somehow impossibly real – but given that it’s so close to my theoretical perfect game that having not-quite-right spaceships is a bit jarring.

It depends what vibe they’re going for – if they want a seventies effect, then surely they should go for either battered industrial tugboats like Star Wars or Alien, or for mad Rodney Matthews / Chris Foss space anvils. The ones in the video looked a bit mid-nineties CGI.

I feel terrible for even saying that. If they pull this off, the developers should be crowned King of Games. But as Iain M Banks knows, the key to succeeding in SF is to get the spaceships right, and if they don’t do this they have failed, even if they successfully create the entire universe and make an amazing game and oh god what am I on about

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Weird, because that’s the one thing I don’t like about it – I don’t like the ship designs at all. It seems almost churlish to say so, because it’s basically the game a ten year-old in 1991 would pretend that he’d played on a holiday to America - only it’s actually somehow impossibly real – but given that it’s so close to my theoretical perfect game that having not-quite-right spaceships is a bit jarring.

It depends what vibe they’re going for – if they want a seventies effect, then surely they should go for either battered industrial tugboats like Star Wars or Alien, or for mad Rodney Matthews / Chris Foss space anvils. The ones in the video looked a bit mid-nineties CGI.

I feel terrible for even saying that. If they pull this off, the developers should be crowned King of Games. But as Iain M Banks knows, the key to succeeding in SF is to get the spaceships right, and if they don’t do this they have failed, even if they successfully create the entire universe and make an amazing game and oh god what am I on about

It does seem a bit hit and miss but just look at this beast. It's like the cover of a 8-bit programming manual... :D

NMS_1.jpg

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They should get that guy who designed all the Sinclair stuff, they had a glorious aesthetic going on, especially when you look at the later, unused prototype designs.

Still, I didn't think the ships shown in the demo looked too bad, they seemed to capture that chunky, 70s Star Wars feel to my mind.

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They should get that guy who designed all the Sinclair stuff, they had a glorious aesthetic going on, especially when you look at the later, unused prototype designs.

Still, I didn't think the ships shown in the demo looked too bad, they seemed to capture that chunky, 70s Star Wars feel to my mind.

11289771035_f2e373b963.jpg
image by deKay01, on Flickr
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This was easily the most impressive thing to have been revealed recently, I remember an old Edge article ages ago by another fallen British developer looking to do something with procedural generation back when the technology wasn't up to it, and now we have some Ex-Criterion/Kuju blokes giving it another go. Looking on their website shows they have been hinting about this for a while:

iFjshZf.png

This is our secret project. Someday we’ll even get time to work on it. Joe Danger is a lovely quirky little house that we have handcrafted. It’s the best thing we have ever done. Our next game is a skyscraper. It’s where everything has been building.

Sony got shown it ahead of time:

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Articles on RPS, Eurogamer and Polygon. The chap in charge hates the lazy comparison thing but at a push mentions elements of Minecraft, Day Z, Dark Souls, and Journey to a degree in a kind of roguealike. Everyone starts on reasonably Earth-like worlds at the rim of the galaxy and the 'goal' (of sorts) is to reach the centre, which gets stranger and weirder the deeper in you go. Resources to be found on planets, whoever discovers a planet can announce it but of course that can lead to others showing up and ravaging its resources, etc.

It kind of feels like it's not just us excited, it looks like the whole industry's going mental for it.

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The RPS article is interesting, in that it says that the game isn’t an MMORPG, but it does have massively multiplayer aspects. Like, if you make a species extinct, it will be extinct for all players, not just for you. Sounds cool, but at the same time, it sounds like the potential for trolling will be staggering.

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