Jump to content
rllmuk
Sign in to follow this  
Wiper

The Greatest PC Games of All Time: The Results - Top 5 now up.

Recommended Posts

Not a fan, then? :P

You haven't seen the half of it ;)

I almost put Settlers 2 on my own top 10 list but decided to go with LBA2 as the 'game I played far too much of at the age of 10' entry. Absolute peak of the Settlers series there though - I remember being so very excited about Settlers 3 and then being very disappointed indeed when I finally got it.

and as an addendum to Things I Don't Like About Civilization, they managed to compound the sheer wrongness of the historical approach by going full Great Man Theory in Civ 4 :P

Great Man Theory is clearly the best theory. The Odyssey and Iliad would be far less entertaining had the ancient Greeks not been so keen on it. On a similar note, I feel that more historians should note the benefits that pederasty can bring, and should encourage a more positive perception of the taking of slaves in war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

40. Homeworld - with 4 votes. Average placement: 3rd. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Plums.

And after hell, comes heaven. I couldn't have chosen a better juxtaposition myself. Homeworld is the Absolute Best singleplayer RTS ever released. Not a doubt about it. It's also, astonishingly, still one of the most beautiful - the art behind the ship design and visual effects completely overcoming the archaic engine. Oh, and it's still the only space-based series to get 3D control right. Oh, and the music's brilliant. Oh, and the story's great. Oh, and it's rock-hard. Oh, and the combat is as tactical as it's beautiful. Oh, oh, oh yes.

Oh, are you still here? Sorry about that.

:hug:

It's a travesty that I was the only one to mention my other stone-cold space classic - I-war.

Seeing this in the top 50 goes some way to making up for it though.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally, though, I'd rather play a city builder. Preferably The Settlers II (now there's a game that languishes far too low in the list).

Considering I was the only person to even bother voting for it, you're lucky somebody bothered as I did consider dropping it for something else :P, but it's fairly unique so I kept it in. I wish they'd make one without the combat or the polygons, but keep the whimsy and relaxed nature of it, and more farm animals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here goes! 37-22:

37. The Secret of Monkey Island - with 5 votes. Average placement: 5th
The Secret of Monkey Island, true to its name, holds a secret most dark. Come closer, and I shall let you in on it. Closer. Closer. Yes, just there. Would you like to know the secret?


It's aged rather badly.


Not graphically, not really - it's still a surprisingly pretty game (far moreso than its slightly tacky remake's "HD" skin) - but the humour, the puzzles, both have dated. It was the first of its kind - the first genuinely funny adventure game - and it still tells a compelling story, with likeable characters. But the humour, so fresh, so unexpected at the time, is dampened. It lacks the punch of Sam and Max, the wit of Day of the Tentacle, or the ambience of Grim Fandango, and its light is much diminished in their presence.


And yet, despite all this, it's still better, still funnier, than any of the non-Lucasarts comedy adventures. And it still has its moments - the wedding, the sword-fighting, the tattoo, the cannibals - it just can't match up to the first time it came into our lives, introducing a completely different approach to computer game storytelling, and to the very purpose of an adventure game. But then, how could it?


36. Rollercoaster Tycoon - with 5 votes. Average placement: 5th
Chris Sawyer was bored. He'd allowed players to build virtual train sets, and virtual transport networks, but he'd gotten tired of public transport. What next?


He cast his eyes over the games scattered about his office floor: no inspiration came. Surely he couldn't be out of ideas? Just as he began to lament his talent's passing, a dusty box caught his attention. Far in the corner lay one of Bullfrog's old successes - Theme Park. An odd game, sponsored by Midland Bank, he'd always felt it was a bit too messy, a bit too simple, but there was a kernal of something there, waiting to be discovered. What was it that had piqued his interest, all those years ago? He wracked his brain, trying to remember...


The rollercoasters, that was it! Laying them out, adding in loops and other features - but it had been so limited, so... unimportant, in the grand scheme of the game. He knew what he was going to do. He was going to build a game about designing rollercoasters. Not just any game about designing rollercoasters: it would be the best game about designing rollercoasters that the world had ever seen!


And you know what? That's exactly what he went and did.


36. X-Wing - with 6 votes. Average placement: 6th
Wing Commander was the ultimate in gaming space opera. It had oodles of cut-scenes, character development, an epic story, and even a branching storyline. All Lucasarts had to do to take that crown from it was replicate the experience, and add the Star Wars branding.


They didn't.


Instead, they took a long, hard look at Wing Commander - at its focus on cut-scenes, on being Top Gun in space - and decided that wasn't good enough. Not. Good. Enough. Of course, they had some advantages: with the Star Wars licence, their story, their main characters, were already defined. So instead, they focussed on something else, something far more important: they focussed on making the best god-damned space combat simulator they could. Taking cues from Star Wars' great nemesis, Star Trek, they added power management to the mix - forcing the player to choose between shields, engines and lasers, to refocus their shields on the fly during dogfights. They made sure the combat took place in a truly 3D space - no sprites on display here, every ship was fully represented in 3D. And they made the combat fast, and brutal. It was perfection.


34. Baldur's Gate - with 7 votes. Average placement: 6th
The game that catapulted Bioware into the spotlight, proving that there was still money to be made in the isometric RPG market - so long as the writing was up to scratch. An epic tale of magic and deception, what made Baldur's Gate so memorable was its characters. That, and its brilliant transferring of the AD&D ruleset to PC. Truth be told, it was always a little too dry, a little too trad-fantasy in its outlook, for me to really love it, but I did enjoy the few tens of hours I spent with it.


34. Transport Tycoon - with 6 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Marzipan Travolta and Scouser in Exile.
(I've included a vote for Transport Tycoon Deluxe, and a vote for Open Transport Tycoon Deluxe, together here - if anyone feels strongly that I oughtn't to have, do let me know)
When railways seem too large, and rollercoasters seem too small, there's always Transport Tycoon. Much like Sim City 2000, this game has stood the test of time, brushing off all its competition with the greatest of ease - no other game manages to make the managing of a transport network so intuitive, so enjoyable. Somehow, despite a concept as exciting as watching cheese form, Transport Tycoon manages to be a captivating and thought-provoking game.


32. The Elder Scrolls: Morrowind - with 7 votes. Average placement: 6th
Okay, the writing's still pants, and the first-person combat has some... teething issues, but my god, what vision. As far from the generic fantasy land of Oblivion as could be imagined, the world of Morrowind is a bizarre, unique place. You can feel the engine bursting at the seams as it tries to display this vast environment, but the design shines through. A world of peril, with every new summit, every cavern, hiding potentially lethal secrets. You have to earn the right to explore safely, learn to master the skills you'll need to survive - the ability to fight, to take damage, to escape, to heal - making progress truly meaningful. It may be getting a bit long in the tooth, but Morrowind is still the most impressive, most ambitious of the Elder Scrolls titles.


32. Quake 3 Arena - with 7 votes. Average placement: 6th
See entry number No. 58, Unreal Tournament.


30. Team Fortress 2 - with 7 votes. Average placement: 6th
Endless combat, as Red and "Blu" fight one another without cease. But it's cartoony, and has hats! And look, there are some funny trailers for the 'characters' you can play as! Yay! Oh, and it's free now, so that's nice.


29. Half Life 2 Episode 2 - with 5 votes. Average placement: 4th
Valve decide that Episode 1 wasn't quite enough of a stretch of the meaning of the term 'episodic', spend over a year producing a five-hour game using an existing engine and adding no new features.


Worldwide acclaim follows.


29. Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis - with 8 votes. Average placement: 6th
Ah, now this is a narrative-led game. Solid puzzles, three completely different routes through the game, Nazis, an absurdly hard glyph-based puzzle, that bullwhip, and some atrocious voice acting. Great stuff.


27. Age of Empires 2 - with 8 votes. Average placement: 6th

Remember Age of Empires, all those places below? Like that, but newer.


27. Battlefield 1942 - with 5 votes. Average placement: 4th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Dave White and Valver.
Remember Battlefield 2, all those places below? Like that, but older.


27. Civilization 4 - with 6 votes. Average placement: 5th
It's hard to believe that Civilization 4 is getting close to 10 years old. When did that happen? Following the misstep that was Civilization 3, this is the game that restored faith in the series, bringing in meaningful changes - levelling units, choices of religion, more complicated civics - making the game feel fresh. But is fresh necessarily better? It's hard to say. For some, Civilization 2 remains the pinnacle of the series, its relative simplicity lending it elegance which Civilization 4 lacks. For others, Civilization 4's new features, new graphics, and guided introductions, all make it that much more accessible. Whatever the case, it's certainly one of the most fondly remembered games in the series.


27. Diablo 2 - with 8 votes. Average placement: 6th
The clicker supreme. If I was surprised to see Diablo 3 voted higher than the original, Diablo 2's position left me as stunned as rain in Wales. Justly considered the greatest of its ilk, Diablo 2 never quite overcame my natural disinclination for grind- and loot-based games, but it did a better job than most. Allowing for a healthy amount of customisation and skill-based play, Diablo 2 was perfect gaming while travelling; easy to whip out and play for a few minutes or a few hours, simple enough that a mediocre PC could run it, not too challenging for casual play, not too shallow for focussed gaming - it was a laptop's best friend. Just as well for my wallet that Diablo 3 put paid to that possibility, I suppose.


23. Dark Souls - with 7 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by alistarr and charley farley.
Unforgiving. Uncompromising. Unique. Trend-setting. A ball-breaker. Gorgeous. Mysterious. Never unfair. Such are the praises lavished upon Dark Souls.


Alas, all I ever played was Demon's Souls (on PS3, obviously), and found it to be drab, boring, clunky; a roguelike without the commitment. The online integration was pretty cute, though. Not, I fear, for me. Maybe Dark Souls is better. alistarr certainly thinks so.


22. Baldur's Gate 2 - with 9 votes. Average placement: 6th
Like Baldur's Gate, but longer!


Yeah, I didn't get very far with this one. Meant to be pretty neat, though, if you've the patience.

  • Upvote 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:hug:

It's a travesty that I was the only one to mention my other stone-cold space classic - I-war.

Seeing this in the top 50 goes some way to making up for it though.

I mentioned them both, but couldnt be arsed to format my list properly. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dark Souls is better!

I think what it adds to the formula provided by Demon's Souls isn't so much in the mechanics or the presentation as it is in the world- and narrative-building: where other games might tend to overload you with lore and meaning to try and convince you that their world is real and its fate should be important, Dark Souls doesn't care whether you find any of that out or not - it doesn't care about you in any way whatsoever, to be honest. But as far as the narrative is concerned, it's there only if you seek it out. Every character and creature has a story, but just like in your real life people don't just tell you their dark secrets - you have to tease bits of information out of them, guess at the stories they omit, piece together your own idea of how the world is and who/how these people might be. The story is written into the landscape for you to find, but it doesn't offer itself up any more in that imagined world of mountains and dragons than it does in this real world of mountains and websites.

And the interconnected structure of the physical world those creatures inhabit is a masterpiece in its own right - you cross a walkway and look down onto a drab and downcast backdrop, only to find yourself, thirty hours later in your quest, trudging through what you thought was painted scenery and trying to deal with the horrors it contains, before realising where you are and looking up to find that you can see the point you started from all those hours (and all those deaths) ago. And it does look comforting, and far away. Even the game mechanics work to impart the messages of the world on you - by forcing you to repeat sections until you are good enough to overcome their challenges it guides you back and forth across the same ground until that ground becomes part of your psyche, as familiar as your own body.

So the game's storytelling choices say that to learn anything you must be inquisitive and thorough, and its world points out poetry in the mundane shapes of weeds and mossy stone, and the gameplay it inherits from Demon's Souls reminds you constantly that there is no such thing as an unearned reward. The nice scottish chap who does those Chuckiedregs videos points out that, all the time, the game just whispers "learn me! learn me!" at you, offering glimpses of magic but no promise of ever reaching them, but at a certain point you realise that you're also muttering back "teach me! teach me!" as you gain tiny, hard-earned pieces of understanding of yourself and the world you inhabit, and how to go about living in it. Which I think is kind of the point of all creative work.

Plus the game is just fun once you get to know it a bit.

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dark Souls is better!

I think what it adds to the formula provided by Demon's Souls isn't so much in the mechanics or the presentation (similar across the two games, and I like 'em!) as it is in the world- and narrative-building: where most games overload you with lore and meaning to try and convince you that their world is real and its fate should be important, Dark Souls doesn't care whether you find any of that out or not - it doesn't care about you in any way whatsoever, to be honest. But as far as the narrative is concerned, it's there only if you seek it out. Every character and creature has a story, but just like in your real life people don't just tell you their dark secrets - you have to tease bits of information out of them, guess at the stories they omit, piece together your own idea of how the world is and who/how these people might be. The story is written into the landscape for you to find, but it doesn't offer itself up any more in that imagined world of mountains and dragons than it does in this real world of mountains and websites.

And the interconnected structure of the physical world those creatures inhabit is a masterpiece in its own right - you cross a walkway and look down onto a drab and downcast backdrop, only to find yourself, thirty hours later in your quest, trudging through what you thought was painted scenery and trying to deal with the horrors it contains, before realising where you are and looking up to find that you can see the point you started from all those hours (and all those deaths) ago. And it does look comforting, and far away. Even the game mechanics work to impart the messages of the world on you - by forcing you to repeat sections until you are good enough to overcome their challenges it guides you back and forth across the same ground until that ground becomes part of your psyche, as familiar as your own body.

So the game's storytelling choices say that to learn anything you must be inquisitive and thorough, and its world points out poetry in the mundane shapes of weeds and mossy stone, and the gameplay it inherits from Demon's Souls reminds you constantly that there is no such thing as an unearned reward. The nice scottish chap who does those Chuckiedregs videos points out that, all the time, the game just whispers "learn me! learn me!" at you, offering glimpses of magic but no promise of ever reaching them, but at a certain point you realise that you're also muttering back "teach me! teach me!" as you gain tiny, hard-earned pieces of understanding of yourself and the world you inhabit, and how to go about living in it. Which I think is kind of the point of all creative work.

Plus the game is just fun once you get to know it a bit.

I've put a link to this post in Demon's Souls' entry.

I mentioned them both, but couldnt be arsed to format my list properly. :P

Indeed - you included them in an unsorted list of 15 games, then provided the following sorted list at the end:

XCOM

Dues Ex

Minecraft

Homeworld

JA2

Freespace

Any of the rest.

I did what I could with what I had, so at least you got a top six in!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also your annotations are much appreciated - for someone who missed at least a decade of PC gaming it's like a condensed history of just the good bits!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fear my experiences are limited (and my tastes moreso), so some games receive a rather shorter thrift than they perhaps deserve, but I'm glad you're enjoying the commentary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just realised that Homeworld and I-War are the only two old school games that I've kept boxed.

post-2222-0-08586000-1376588956.jpg

Big, beautiful boxes, thick manuals filled with amazing backstory and even a poster. That's classic PC gaming.

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice poster!

Despite recently having a ruthless clearout (while moving into a tiny house a couple of month ago) I still have Sim City 2000 because I couldn't bear to part with it, and of course I've kept this one too:

P1070990_zpsadeaa507.jpg

The crumpled bit of paper is a letter from Kellogg's - apparently I won this game in a cereal box competition!

...anyway, here's a better look at the poster while I'm at it:

P1070995_zpsfff4cb4c.jpg

I'm going to have to play it again at some point to find out if I was right to put it underneath Dark Souls on my list...

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fear my experiences are limited (and my tastes moreso), so some games receive a rather shorter thrift than they perhaps deserve, but I'm glad you're enjoying the commentary.

I'm genuinely seething with rage at some of them then realising how utterly ridiculous that is and feeling like a tit. Keep them up, I'm enjoying the emotional rollercoaster!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm genuinely seething with rage at some of them then realising how utterly ridiculous that is and feeling like a tit. Keep them up, I'm enjoying the emotional rollercoaster!

All part of the service ;)

(Why make a boring, neutered list like every magazine ever, when I can instead make a highly personalised, antagonistic one, eh?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

27. Age of Empires 2 - with 8 votes. Average placement: 6th

Remember Age of Empires 2, all those places below? Like that, but newer.

Typo?

Oh and so I don't look like a dick: thanks for this Wiper, it's a brilliant read and is keeping me genuinely excited for the next reveal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I'm an idiot! The listed game is Age of Empires 2, but I meant to refer to the original Age of Empires in the blurb. Corrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we should all commit to immediately play at least one of the top 10 games that we haven't played or have previously overlooked. If you have played all of the top 10 then go to the next 10 and so on. The only reasonable caveat is that the game must still be able to be experienced properly I.e. only still active online games.

Thanks for all the work wiper, it's been a great read so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If old xcom comes up (and it will), I recommend getting the extender mod for it. Seems to work very well.

Also, agreed on the old paperwork. I used to love the pages of backstory and technical specs for gear etc, but you dont get it now. Probably because actual in game storytelling is better now, but it's still nice to have mixed media. Homeworld was among the very best for this.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If old xcom comes up (and it will), I recommend getting the extender mod for it. Seems to work very well.

Terror from the Deep already did come up. Unless you meant UFO, of course, and were being so awful as to call that by its silly American name. In which case I couldn't possibly comment as to whether it's appearing anywhere in the top 20.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the subsequent branding over the intervening years has got to me. Lets face it, xcom is the dominant ip that everyone knows it by.

But I would assume it'd chart higher. Always seems to as a trend, and I get the impression that tftd is oft regarded with mixed feelings. basically a reskin, but with difficulty beefed up to masochistic levels due to longer missions and such. Dunno, I always preferred the idea of an air/land war tbh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See, I find UFO: Enemy Unknown a particularly useful title now that XCOM: Enemy Unknown is out - makes a clear distinction between the original and the remake.

And yeah, if I'd voted for either it would have been UFO, not Terror from the Deep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, agreed on the old paperwork. I used to love the pages of backstory and technical specs for gear etc, but you dont get it now. Probably because actual in game storytelling is better now, but it's still nice to have mixed media. Homeworld was among the very best for this.

The Homeworld manual is superb. It's like a history textbook and sets up the game perfectly. It wouldn't be possible to do it as effectively in-game.

The I-War box is just a work of art. It's beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

21. Championship/Football Manager - with 9 votes. Average placement: 6th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by radlord and Spork.

By which I mean Championship Manager before the Sports Interactive/Eidos split, obviously enough. If anyone did actually mean to vote for the post-Sports Interactive version... are you insane? Anyway. This is it, the one, the only, the supreme spreadsheet-with-a-paintjob available on PC. Over the years features have been added - 3D match engines, more in-depth player management - but the overall experience has never changes: this remains the pre-eminent exercise in fiddling with numbers. Which, when you think about it, is perhaps one of the most impressive achievements in this list: making an FPS is costly, time-consuming, difficult - your only competition is a handful of other developers. Anyone can make a football management spreadsheet, so competition could come from anywhere. To hold so complete a stranglehold on a genre with such a low barrier to entry, that's quite the thing. So, hats off to Sports Interactive, eh - good work!


21. Portal 2 - with 10 votes. Average placement: 7th
Ah, finally Valve show their quality. Now this is a game: witty, entertaining, brain-teasing, any and all downtime is brought about by the player trying to outthink the next puzzle, rather than being stuck in a room as a clutch of morons waffle ceaselessly and try to converse with a mute main character. Alas, the formula from Portal is somewhat diluted by new elements - the various goos that the players are given add options, but remove some of the subtlety and focus of the original game's puzzles, the replacement of any skill-based challenges with a purely cerebral approach is also a bit of a shame.


Also, Stephen Merchant can sod right off.


But despite all of this, Portal 2 remains a brilliant game, and its new lick of paint provides some genuinely stunning sights - not bad for a game designed in an engine close to ten years old. So, yes, good on you Valve - you have made two decent games in your lifetime.

21. Thief II: The Metal Age - with 8 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Mr. Gerbik.
If Thief was where things got serious, Thief II is where stealth gaming was perfected. Fewer zombies, more expansive levels, the same great engine, great setting, great characters. It may be ugly as sin, but it still manages to be absurdly atmospheric, and as a stealth game it's, well, perfect. Wonderful level design. Stealth mechanics as intuitive and logical as you like. Sword fighting that, in fact, is pretty bloody good. Difficulty settings that don't just magically make enemies stronger and more observant, but makes your very objectives more challenging. And, pleasingly like the original, a game which doesn't glorify violence - the highest difficulties preclude the player from committing murder. Oh, and just in case all of that wasn't enough, the plot's pretty neat too.


I'm sad that this (technically) missed out on being in the top 20, but I'm glad to see how close it came. Every self-respecting gamer should play Thief II - particularly with the upcoming Thief game threatening to do its best to demolish the brand - so that they can understand just how good stealth games can be. Absolutely untouchable.


18. UFO: Enemy Unknown - with 6 votes. Average placement: 3rd. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Vulgar Monkey.
As I went to write about this game, I came to a startling, horrifying realisation. UFO: Enemy Unknown is a brilliant game, yes. Important, inventive, genre-defining, all of that. It's also a searing indictment of the British development community that this game - over twenty years old, put together on a shoestring budget by a tiny team, barely making it into the top 20 PC games - is Britain's crowning achievement of PC game design, if this forum's voting is anything to go by. We're beaten out by a horde of American developers, and a lone Swede. And our next-greatest game is a glorified spreadsheet, also harking back to the early '90s. For shame, Britain, for shame.


Ah well, at least we can thank the Gollop brothers for the fact that our top-ranked game is an absolute barnstormer. Archaic controls aside, the game still stands up, all these years on - a brutal affair, it requires dedication and brains to see things through to the bitter end. The combat can seem a bit long-winded these days - XCOM: Enemy Unknown's streamlining of the formula is not without merit - but the scale of the battles and requirement for improvisation make each encounter with the enemy an epic, memorable undertaking. Still well worth booting up to save the world, every once in a while.
Also, those comic-book stylings are missed.


17. Minecraft - with 11 votes. Average placement: 6th
Out of nowhere, Minecraft changed the world, by allowing us to change its. Like Lego, this is a game I can enjoy in bitesize chunks, whose aims I can admire, but that I've never had an urge to spend large amounts of time with. My brother, however, is a different case. Aged 11 when I introduced him to Minecraft, he's played it solidly, to the exception of all other games, for three years. He still loves it.
Can't argue with that. Quite the thing, Minecraft, quite the thing.


16. Alpha Centauri - with 9 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by dirk_beefhammer and mushashi.
I've mentioned elsewhere that I've never had a particular attachment to 4X games. I enjoy them, certainly, and will snap up most decent 4X games, complete them, then discard them forever. They give me a few tens of hours of entertainment, and then I get bored, and that's that.


Alpha Centauri is the only 4X game I've completed twice.


15. Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge - with 8 votes. Average placement: 3rd. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by larrydavidsanger.
I'm never quite sure where I stand on Monkey Island 2. More sophisticated than Secret, certainly. More involved, with a brilliant supporting cast. Oh, and it's the best looking of the non-cartoony Lucasarts adventures by quite some way, which is to say that it's beautiful. But its puzzles... to call them obtuse is to do them a great disservice. Routinely as obscure as Jude, as convoluted as string theory, as opaque as a black hole, they made this the first game I ever resorted to a guide to complete. And then there's that whole framing narrative bumpf... no sir, I'm not sure where I stand on Monkey Island 2.


14. Counterstrike - with 10 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Polmon and Radish.
By now, you've probably worked out how much informed opinion I have to offer on multiplayer shooters. Still, I'll give it a stab: like other team-based shooters, but with more bunny-hopping, knives and terrorists. Game of the year!

13. Grim Fandango - with 11 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Pedro de las Motagnes and Rudi von Starnberg.
The best game ever made that stars Ugly Betty's dad. The best game ever based on the day of the dead. The best game ever to feature a large orange demon called Glottis.


I jest, I jest. This is, comfortably, one of the greatest adventure games of all time. Despite the aging graphics. Despite the awful controls. Despite the fact that I never completed it due to my copy's third disc being fucked, and never letting me get passed the section where you're in the car. Damn, but I need to go back to it and complete the game - but those graphics, those controls make it so difficult! If any of the games on this list need a remake, this is the one.


But despite all that, despite only ever getting halfway through the game, its qualities are plain to see. Fantastic dialogue, brilliant voice-acting, an incredible setting, great characters. Man.


12. Quake - with 12 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by PK..
Never played it. Watched my cousin play it, though. It seemed rather brown. PK. may offer a slightly more useful perspective.


11. Planescape: Torment - with 13 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Captain LeChuck and Miner Willy.
Played this one, though. What can be said about Planescape: Torment that hasn't been said a thousand times before? It is, quite simply, the most well-written game of all time. Taking the role of the Nameless One, an unkillable, amnesiac being - this is an RPG that doesn't force you to grind in order to progress (you are immortal after all, so death isn't much of a worry), but instead makes you think about how best to progress. Moreover, you're on no grand quest to save the world, no great mission - your task is simply to find yourself. Because, uniquely, this is a game which doesn't just play the amnesiac protagonist card as a quick setup option, but explores all the possibilities such a setup could offer. In its focus on story over everything, in its inward-looking aims, Planescape Torment has more in common with a point and click adventure than the average RPG - only, instead of illogical puzzles, you have branching quests and dialogues to deal with, and a complex story to unravel. And, yes, some fights to win.


For many years, this was a difficult game to buy, never mind play. Now you can buy it for under a fiver from GOG.com, download it straight away, install the widescreen mod and play the greatest interactive story around. So what are you waiting for?

  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13. Grim Fandango - with 11 votes. Average placement: 5th. Voted the greatest PC game of all time by Pedro de las Motagnes and Rudi von Starnberg.

The best game ever made that stars Ugly Betty's dad. The best game ever based on the day of the dead. The best game ever to feature a large orange demon called Glottis.

I jest, I jest. This is, comfortably, one of the greatest adventure games of all time. Despite the aging graphics. Despite the awful controls. Despite the fact that I never completed it due to my copy's third disc being fucked, and never letting me get passed the section where you're in the car. Damn, but I need to go back to it and complete the game - but those graphics, those controls make it so difficult! If any of the games on this list need a remake, this is the one.

But despite all that, despite only ever getting halfway through the game, its qualities are plain to see. Fantastic dialogue, brilliant voice-acting, an incredible setting, great characters. Man.

Don't despair. Just watch Grim Fandango: The Movie! It's a Let's Play of the game with absolutely no commentary, and divided into four parts just like the game so you can watch each part like an episode of a miniseries. The guy playing it (and determinedly not recording commentary because he knows the game's atmosphere and dialogue is its strength) knows exactly how to pace things so it's an entertaining watch.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

over twenty years old, put together on a shoestring budget by a tiny team, barely making it into the top 20 PC games - is Britain's crowning achievement of PC game design

Good point.

Off the top of my head, we've also got rebellion (made the amazing avp, and a bunch of very hit and miss games since) and err.....molyneux.

I suppose shiny did a few good uns back in the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget The Creative Assembly - silly underperforming Total War games.

Oh, and little old Rockstar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah bloody hell, I keep forgetting they're british.

I guess because they're so big and multinational now. Also because all their games focus really heavily on various aspects of americana.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.