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E3 - Microsoft Conference Thread (June 10th - UK: 17:30 / EU 18:30)


Robo_1
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If you want a Japanese and indie push, you've come to the wrong conference.

so very true :)

but keeping positive, in the past they have done well with a Japanese made exclusive rpgs, they where the best for indies back in the day too

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I do wonder how much Kinect will play a part of the conference. They're clearly going to be aiming to woo the core this E3, and they know we're generally not big fans of Kinect demonstrations.

The Mirrors Edge 2 fall out, if indeed it is Kinectcentric is going to be a bit:

smile-shock.gif

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They'll have to have a bunch of traditional hardcore games and franchises otherwise they'll lose even the ones who are still positive about it (all five of them).

With added Kinect features of course :)

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so very true :)

but keeping positive, in the past they have done well with a Japanese made exclusive rpgs

In signing them up, perhaps to start with. In terms of having successful ones, not so much. I don't see a repeat, the developers will surely just stick to Sony or multi platform rather than Xbox exclusives. Most of the exclusives were time based.

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People often say the small size of Japanese houses and rooms and its incompatibility with kinect type movement is a hindrance. The funny thing is I recently read an article in a broadsheet that stated that new build properties in the UK have the smallest bedrooms and living rooms of any developed country - and by quite a long way. The average Japanese property was over 33% larger than the UK average. And for new builds read properties build since 1980. Certainly most places I have lived in as a tenant in the private sector are useless for kinect. As such I have no interest even if it was interesting.

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Won't the xbox drm system kill it in Japan anyway? I'm sure they don't have a gamestop type centric retail model there do they?

What I gather from the 8-4 Play podcast is that selling and trading games is integral to the market in Japan; I want to say new prices are comparatively much higher than the West, and rentals don't exist. I also get the impression that where people purchase games from is more fragmented than the US or UK, so the "participating retailers" thing could prove challenging.

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If Mirror's Edge 2 is a mostly-Kinect game, they will have shown themselves to have no clue about what their audience wants. It'll be yet another case of taking something good and Microsofting it into the awfulzone.

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How would you even play a free running game on kinect? It would be hilarious- would faith be on autorun and you have to do these bizarre gestures to guide her through the level? I honestly can't even envision it.

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I think you've pretty much hit the nail on the head there, swiping to turn etc - temple run, basically.

Their thinking will be "now we can get the hardcore gamers AND the casuals on side, by taking this hardcore favourite and making it a casual Kinect game!"

Seriously, that's how Microsoft business decisions go nowadays. "Hey, let's take this unpopular mobile touch OS and jam it into our resignedly popular desktop OS! That way everyone will come to love our unpopular mobile touch OS and buy our phones and tablets!"

*crickets*

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People often say the small size of Japanese houses and rooms and its incompatibility with kinect type movement is a hindrance. The funny thing is I recently read an article in a broadsheet that stated that new build properties in the UK have the smallest bedrooms and living rooms of any developed country - and by quite a long way. The average Japanese property was over 33% larger than the UK average. And for new builds read properties build since 1980. Certainly most places I have lived in as a tenant in the private sector are useless for kinect. As such I have no interest even if it was interesting.

My living room is 3m wide by 4m deep - plenty big enough to play chase with my 5 year old. Im 6' 4" though. When I had a Kinect I had to stand almost 3maway from it, almost against the sofa, for it to see me and playing with 2 players wasn't possible.

It's shit, and I'll never go near it again.

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Which universe is this where Siri doesn't work? It's mainly flawless on the iPhone 5 as far as I can tell.

Mine, it's so bad me and the wife try to get it to work for a laugh when we're really bored. The other day we tried "navigate to spinningfields manchester" and the closest Siri got was either playing some music or trying to launch facetime.

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People often say the small size of Japanese houses and rooms and its incompatibility with kinect type movement is a hindrance. The funny thing is I recently read an article in a broadsheet that stated that new build properties in the UK have the smallest bedrooms and living rooms of any developed country - and by quite a long way. The average Japanese property was over 33% larger than the UK average. And for new builds read properties build since 1980. Certainly most places I have lived in as a tenant in the private sector are useless for kinect. As such I have no interest even if it was interesting.

My living room is 3m wide by 4m deep - plenty big enough to play chase with my 5 year old. Im 6' 4" though. When I had a Kinect I had to stand almost 3maway from it, almost against the sofa, for it to see me and playing with 2 players wasn't possible.

It's shit, and I'll never go near it again.

Kinect 2.0 is supposed to work with less room, requires no specfic lighting conditions, reads muscle contractions* and heart rates and be more accurate. On the bright side fitness and dance games will be the best. I can see them picking up sales based on Kinect demonstrations in stores, but of course unfit and unconditioned couch gamers are going to scoff at it.

*may not be accurate as going off the top of my head on that one

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It figures out muscle tension, balance etc. from your standing posture but it can't read it directly. Presumably that's part of the SDK and available to devs and not just a tech demo. It reads your pulse because it has an active IR camera that sees through the surface layer of skin. (The same thing that gives it night vision.)

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Can they just do away with batteries in the controller and use Kinect to see which direction I'm pushing the sticks and which buttons I'm pressing? That way they can have Kinect integration with all their games and I'll still be happy.

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Kinect 2.0 is supposed to work with less room, requires no specfic lighting conditions, reads muscle contractions* and heart rates and be more accurate. On the bright side fitness and dance games will be the best. I can see them picking up sales based on Kinect demonstrations in stores, but of course unfit and unconditioned couch gamers are going to scoff at it.

*may not be accurate as going off the top of my head on that one

Kinect 1 was supposed to work as well. Show me it working coupled to some interesting games and you may get a Roger Moore'd eyebrow worth of interest from me, but until then I refuse to buy into the empty words they say about it.

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