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Question - How did the Amiga shape up against the SNES/MD?

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On 10/11/2019 at 20:21, dumpster said:

I've asked this before and not really got an answer, but if any amiga coders are reading this, here is a question.

 

Could an Amiga do a perfect conversion of the Playstation Ridge Racer, if you ignore the graphics and concentrate on the handling? 

 

The 3D texture mapped world was amazing for the PS in 1995 or whenever,  but it was the physics and proper 3D moddeling that made it such a playable game, and i wondered if the Amiga could have done that as a 100% perfect conversion, if it was done in wireframe? Or with really simplified filled vectors. Could an Amiga copy the gameplay perfectly, and how much of a hit would the graphics have to take to make it 30fps?  

 

 

Maybe im being a bit dumb here, but the Amiga could do Wipeout 2097, so surely Ridge Racer is doable to?

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1 hour ago, Ketchup said:

Maybe im being a bit dumb here, but the Amiga could do Wipeout 2097, so surely Ridge Racer is doable to?

 

It's not standard Amiga hardware running Wipeout 2097. It's a machine with a replacement processor and entirely new graphics hardware.

 

I don't think there were many in existance, but if you were going to pay through the nose to build a crazy Frankenstein's Monster of a computer I can't think of many better uses for it then playing Wipeout 2097.

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I recall being impressed by the Slipstream tech demo when it was released (not now obviously). It runs smoothly on my 68040 A1200, but looks glitchy on every Youtube video I can find (there's also some terrible game play skills on show). Pity it wasn't developed into a full game.

 

 

It's a shame the Amiga technology was never licensed to a Japanese manufacturer for sale in their market. We might have some amazing titles for the machine if Sharp had manufactured Amiga compatible hardware instead of their own X68000 systems.

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3 hours ago, matt0 said:

 

It's not standard Amiga hardware running Wipeout 2097. It's a machine with a replacement processor and entirely new graphics hardware.

 

I don't think there were many in existance, but if you were going to pay through the nose to build a crazy Frankenstein's Monster of a computer I can't think of ANY better uses for it then playing Wipeout 2097.

FTFY :D

 

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11 hours ago, knightbeat said:

I recall being impressed by the Slipstream tech demo when it was released (not now obviously). It runs smoothly on my 68040 A1200, but looks glitchy on every Youtube video I can find (there's also some terrible game play skills on show). Pity it wasn't developed into a full game.

 

 

It's a shame the Amiga technology was never licensed to a Japanese manufacturer for sale in their market. We might have some amazing titles for the machine if Sharp had manufactured Amiga compatible hardware instead of their own X68000 systems.

 

 

I think by the real end of the Amiga's life (like after 95/96), it was showing how there had been no "professional" hardware research and development. The Amiga 4000 was released in 1992 so by the time of that demo (maybe 97?) it was clear that enthusiasts were trying to make the Amiga compete on a hardware level, but the reality of no real R&D for 5 years was making it look pretty ropey. Not only that but with the whole 32bit console generation, games were becoming increasingly polished with significant teams. A group of half a dozen mates putting a game together, like in the early days of the Amiga, just would never come close to Wipeout, Quake or any other games they were trying to emulate.

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18 hours ago, Ketchup said:

Maybe im being a bit dumb here, but the Amiga could do Wipeout 2097, so surely Ridge Racer is doable to?


there is no way on earth a stock Amiga 500 could get anywhere close to Wipeout 2097

 

 

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If you want to see what Wipeout might look like on an Amiga, have a look at either Powerdrome, or Matrix Marauders - the latter game being another Psygnosis racer that Wipeout actually took its ship design from.

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59 minutes ago, K said:

If you want to see what Wipeout might look like on an Amiga, have a look at either Powerdrome, or Matrix Marauders - the latter game being another Psygnosis racer that Wipeout actually took its ship design from.


this is more like the Amiga could achieve, nowhere near wipeout 2097

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Interesting topic. Think the Amigas main success as a game machine back in the day was due to pirated games.

 

Had an Amiga back in the day (when the 500 released) and it wasn't just bought to play games I did a ton other things on it - it was a diverse bit of kit. Had a friend at Uni that had a SNES so got to play on that - which was great but think the games were fairly limited on it. I used to like stuff like flight sims, Elite 2 and adventure type games as well as the odd arcade game. So for me the Amiga was a perfect fit. I did get a SNES in the end to play mainly R-Type, Parodius and a few other arcade games though. But also had a PC to do my course work on and play the deeper games. 

 

It easy looking back I guess but glad I stuck with the Amiga. Learnt lots about coding, Unix type OS and it played games too. I even typed up my reports and assingments on Kindwords (remember that!!!). Also. Well some of the best gaming experiences I had on that were had back then. In particular two player split screen Lotus Turbo Challenge... :) 

 

So yeah consoles were all well and good but in terms of value to me? Not a patch on the Amiga.....

 

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21 hours ago, gone fishin' said:

I think by the real end of the Amiga's life (like after 95/96), it was showing how there had been no "professional" hardware research and development. The Amiga 4000 was released in 1992 so by the time of that demo (maybe 97?) it was clear that enthusiasts were trying to make the Amiga compete on a hardware level, but the reality of no real R&D for 5 years was making it look pretty ropey. Not only that but with the whole 32bit console generation, games were becoming increasingly polished with significant teams. A group of half a dozen mates putting a game together, like in the early days of the Amiga, just would never come close to Wipeout, Quake or any other games they were trying to emulate.

 

Well considering Commodore went bankrupt in '94, the lack of hardware R&D after that may be understandable 

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I think it was more the way Commodore rested on its laurels and also invested in utter insanity. Instead of proper investment in R&D of new chipsets they sat back on the A500 and milked it dry as they produced white elephants endlessly. In '89 they had AAA and AGA chipsets pretty much developed but kept leaning on the A500 as it was making them more and more money, not having the foresight to see that you had to keep up with the market. Even worse they invested in dead products like CDTV - the A500 cd drive - the c65! Then the a600 was a horrible misstep in 1992. Kim Justice explains it far better than I can so I linked her video below.

 

The A1200 machine was great but could have been much better - it should have been released earlier or had better specs.

 

 

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The other issue was that, yes, Commodore went tits up in 1994 but it wasn’t really over for the Amiga, well, the loyal supporters didn’t think that. You had Escom owning it for a while (I’m the back of significant sized companies like Dell bidding for it) and Escom promising to invest in R&D and then when they went belly up there was the promise of Commodore UK’s ex management buying it up, but that didn’t happen. Instead iirc it was Gateway 2000 who bought it and again promised some investment, but by this point it was too late. 
 

But from 1994 onwards I think there was a general belief that the Amiga was just in a bit of a lull and someone would buy it out and invest heavily in it (I remember the pseudo black tower Amiga that was previewed in the late 90s that never materialised) but it never happened. It slowly died a death (although I do remember an hilarious article in one of the later Amiga magazines in around 96/97 that there would be more commercial games released that year than for the Saturn. Just because something was commercial didn’t mean it was particularly good quality or even compared to a 32bit console game)

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14 hours ago, gone fishin' said:

The other issue was that, yes, Commodore went tits up in 1994 but it wasn’t really over for the Amiga, well, the loyal supporters didn’t think that. You had Escom owning it for a while (I’m the back of significant sized companies like Dell bidding for it) and Escom promising to invest in R&D and then when they went belly up there was the promise of Commodore UK’s ex management buying it up, but that didn’t happen. Instead iirc it was Gateway 2000 who bought it and again promised some investment, but by this point it was too late. 
 

But from 1994 onwards I think there was a general belief that the Amiga was just in a bit of a lull and someone would buy it out and invest heavily in it (I remember the pseudo black tower Amiga that was previewed in the late 90s that never materialised) but it never happened. It slowly died a death (although I do remember an hilarious article in one of the later Amiga magazines in around 96/97 that there would be more commercial games released that year than for the Saturn. Just because something was commercial didn’t mean it was particularly good quality or even compared to a 32bit console game)

The video I linked to covers the post-94 Commodore UK and Escom stuff (they wqere both in running to buy it after  Commodore's collapse)) - and it covers all the death throes after that.

 

It is well worth a watch

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Having recently acquired a couple of new Amiga ports for the Mega Drive (Magic Pockets and Switch Blade) it seems a bit out of order to compare them with slick, ultra-stylish, incredible sounding, looking & playing gems such as Xeno Crisis and Tanzer (games I've been fairly obsessed with recently) even though they all fall into the same category of New Unlicensed MD Games.

 

Anyway, I remember quite enjoying this video about the Amiga's history when it first came out and made a mental note to rewatch it some time:

 

 

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