Jump to content
rllmuk
SqueakyG

Question - How did the Amiga shape up against the SNES/MD?

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, nakamura said:

Moonstone, it's a stylish as hell game but it's crap to play. I love how it gets thrown about like it is special. 

 

I like the Amiga mind, for certain types of games it's amazing. 

Wrong. Moonstone is great fun to play. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, K said:

Technically, the Amiga couldn't really compete with PCs or with consoles, 

 

From about 1986 to 1990, it most definitely could. 

Later on, as you say, it got by on the strength of its original games - Cannon Fodder, Sensible Soccer, Mega Lo Mania, Populous 2, Wizkid - quirky US PC conversions such as Monkey Island with its Chris Hülsbeck soundtrack and Dune 2 which did a good job of emulating the experience you'd get on a top-end PC for a fraction of the price. And of course a library of thousands of games, most of which were free thanks to the extent of the piracy on the machine.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Swainy said:


eyNF6iN.jpg

 

It was. Eventually :)

 

That's the crux of the point right there.  If you take an Amiga 1200, whack a CD drive on it and remove the keyboard it doesn't suddenly become a console. It continues to be an Amiga, just a weird hybrid version. This was ably demonstrated by the bundled games, one of which was a platform game that used UP to jump even though the controller had lots of buttons, and Dangerous Streets, an unspeakably dreadful piece of shit that backs up my earlier statement that the Amiga could easily do Streets of Rage but didn't.

 

 

 

 

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder sometimes if the more vocal Amiga fans just never played on the 16 bit consoles. I remember being weirdly anti-console at one point even though previously I loved my friends' Master Systems and what little I'd seen of the NES...? It makes no sense at all.

 

But you could see instantly - the second Green Hill Zone started, or you stepped out of the house in LTTP and the rain started to fall, or the bomber flew overhead in Contra 3, or a glimpse of Street Fighter 2 on the SNES - that the consoles were more capable at pushing sprites, at reproducing the feel and effects of high end arcade machines, the level of polish. The contrast is so stark it blows my mind to this day that people occasionally try and argue otherwise. You didn't even need to play on the consoles, there were TV adverts, Gamesmaster, Bad Influence, bits about games on Saturday morning kids TV. You couldn't escape it.

 

...

 

But I also don't think the comparison is the full story, because you played what you had and on the Amiga you were still spoilt for choice (because you probably had stacks and stacks of pirated stuff...). 

 

One of my favourite Amiga games was Gauntlet 2. It was a regular gaming fixture, a bunch of us gathered round a shitty 14" TV, clutching various knackered competition pro joysticks. Using a heavy book to weight the cord on the knackered parallel port 4 player adaptor just-so or it wouldn't work properly. Dynablaster was usually next, or Hired Guns, complete with arguing about who had to use keys. Or Super Skidmarks, the cows pulling trailers mode. Worms with ridiculous custom levels made in Dpaint.

 

I remember in the mid 90s, well after the PS1 was out, when my PS1 owning best mate would come over, one of things we'd play would be a public domain Tron light cycle game, first to 40 wins. Then Rampart or one of several knock-off split screen Tetris clones. Or a weird psuedo Roguelike competitive dungeon crawl PD game called Knights that was the highlight in a stack of 20 disks I sent off for once. Gravity Force 2 / Power remains an all time favourite. Or Quak with a 99 lives cheat to see how far we could get - trying to remember the layout of the enemies on the earlier levels for the borderline survival horror of the later levels where the enemies were invisible.

 

One of my most played games towards the end of my time with the system was the Amiga port of Angband. An ASCII roguelike.

 

Some of those games were better on the consoles and wouldn't be my first choice of version if I wanted today, some were the complete opposite of what the consoles were offering but they're all games I'd play today if the Amiga was there in front of me.

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Amiga seemed great if you listened to the fans and the UK magazines....then when you objectively experienced one yourself you realised everyone's baby is the most beautiful thing in the world to them though all everyone else sees is an ugly little monkey.

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mwaawm said:

The Amiga seemed great if you listened to the fans and the UK magazines....then when you objectively experienced one yourself you realised everyone's baby is the most beautiful thing in the world to them though all everyone else sees is an ugly little monkey.

 

No, the Amiga was great – you just needed to play it at the right time.

If you grew up in the UK the chances are you had first played games on the 2600, Spectrum, C64 or – if your parents hated you – a CPC.

When Amiga screenshots started filling the magazines it seemed like an illusion. Everything was too bright, too detailed, too real to be possible. Yet it was there in the shops.

 

It blew the 8-bit computers out of the water in every way. But by the time the Super Famicom showed up in magazines for example, the Amiga had been on the market for more than five years. To put that in perspective, the PlayStation appeared just four years after the SFC. In a gaming timeline, the SNES is closer in years to the original PlayStation than it is to the Amiga.

 

The Amiga will always suffer in comparison to the SNES and Megadrive and for me the biggest reason for that was the lack of multi-button controllers. It's easy to be sniffy and dismissive about the Amiga now – its graphics aren't as good as the SNES, it's arcade conversions are worse than the Megadrive's, it's games are very European – but it was of it's time. 

 

 

 

EDIT: For what it's worth I got an Amiga in the summer of 1989, a Super Famicom for Christmas in 1991 and a PlayStation at UK launch in 1995. Loved them all.

  • Upvote 6
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in terms of comparing SNES to Amiga in Uk you may as well compare C64 and Amiga and conclude the former is pointless.

 

SNES uk release was 1992 and the A500 (the popular one so ignoring the A1000 completely) was 1987. C64 was 1992.

 

But also comparing home computers with consoles is also pointless, as pointless as comparing PCs and consoles today. 


As for the games, meh I've talked about it before, the Amiga had plenty of very good arcade action games.

 

EDIT - and for those using a Supergun to play original arcade games at home back in those days? I don't think any home computer experience would satisfy you - it is like someone complaining that a ford mondeo can't beat his ferrari testarossa :D

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, we shouldn't undersell what a leap the 16-bits were. I remember having a Spectrum and going round to a more well-off Amiga owning friends house. He put on some game, and it had great music and full colour graphics and SAMPLED SPEECH and I felt literally sick with pure envy.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, K said:

I sold my Megadrive and all my games for an Amiga 1200 in 1993, and I don't regret it for a second. It was probably the piece of electronic hardware that's brought me the most pleasure out of anything, short of the Xbox 360. Almost everything about the Amiga thrilled me at the time, from the incredible music, the disk-filling animated intros to Psygnosis games, the flight sims, the coverdisks, the demoscene, the random public domain games that were incredible, the RPGs, etc etc. Megadrive games existed in such a narrow band of genres that the sheer variety and sheer weirdness of the Amiga scene was like leaving a theme park and wandering into Glastonbury.

 

It's almost forgotten now, but there was about a 5 year period of time where most high profile CRPGs had an Amiga version, and it was usually the best version. When VGA support started to become standard on PC Eye Of The Beholder and Ultima 6 looked a bit shabby on the Amiga in comparison, but then an Amiga was still half the price of a VGA equipped PC and would plug in to a TV.

 

That's the thing about the Amiga, it's a machine that's aged more than its contemporaries because a lot of what it did have is out of fashion and in 2019 nobody is thinking about the relative costs of an Amiga vs. a PC in 1991.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As well as running in hardware which was 5 years more advanced, I think a big part of the reason top-flight Mega Drive and SNES games looked more impressive than Amiga ones was because the Japanese and American developers put a lot more resources into creating them than UK ones did. Look at the credits list of people involved in making Sonic or Mario Kart. The biggest Amiga games from back then would probably be considered indie games in comparison, taking into account the budgets and size of the teams.

Also - go and play Dungeon Master on the Amiga and SNES, and I then try telling me that the SNES was better at playing games. If you really want to persuade me, do it in 1987 ;)

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Anne Summers said:

 go and play Dungeon Master on the Amiga and SNES, and I then try telling me that the SNES was better at playing games. If you really want to persuade me, do it in 1987 ;)

 

It is curious how 'Amiga to Console' conversions usually sucked. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, nakamura said:

@strider sold his entire NTSC SNES Collection for an Amiga something or other. What a bellend 

Yup, I had an American SNES with around Seventy games and I traded it all in for an Amiga 1200 and stuff like Eye Of The Beholder, Monkey Island, It Came From The Desert etc. I hated the lengthy loading times and disk swapping (I ended up buying a second drive) because it was all so foreign to me. Ultimately I quickly learned that the things I really loved (shmups and arcade games) simply couldn't compete compared to what I had experienced with the SNES and Mega Drive. I do think the Amiga is an excellent machine (I loved most of the Team 17 stuff, Sensi, Cannon Fodder, the D&D games, point-and-click adventures and so on)  but it wasn't right for me and I ended up trading it for a PAL SNES with 10 games, which was an even stupider decision.

  • Upvote 3
  • Empathy 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another mistake was getting a second disk drive rather than a hard drive - the Amiga (particularly 1200) was transformed into an entirely different beast once it has a hard drive attached. 

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, strider said:

Yup, I had an American SNES with around Seventy games and I traded it all in for an Amiga 1200 and stuff like Eye Of The Beholder, Monkey Island, It Came From The Desert etc. I hated the lengthy loading times and disk swapping (I ended up buying a second drive) because it was all so foreign to me. Ultimately I quickly learned that the things I really loved (shmups and arcade games) simply couldn't compete compared to what I had experienced with the SNES and Mega Drive. I do think the Amiga is an excellent machine (I loved most of the Team 17 stuff, Sensi, Cannon Fodder, the D&D games, point-and-click adventures and so on)  but it wasn't right for me and I ended up trading it for a PAL SNES with 10 games, which was an even stupider decision.

Absolutely.

 

The Amiga really is great but if you're not wholly into the right genres, it's not so good. And to be fair, same with the consoles, they just didn't do certain genres like the Amiga. 

 

But that's what's makes the era so amazing! Systems were so different. 

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Anne Summers said:

Another mistake was getting a second disk drive rather than a hard drive - the Amiga (particularly 1200) was transformed into an entirely different beast once it has a hard drive attached. 

Yeah, but I was working at Tesco and filling shelves in the frozen food section so my wage was well beyond getting something that swanky.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread continues to amaze and confuse! :blink: The Amiga was a completely different beast to the 16bit consoles of the time with a breadth of genres the consoles could only dream of having access to. Of course it couldn't hold a candle to the likes of SMW or Contra etc when they arrived, but it was never designed with those in mind. Factor in the fact that tech was moving at such a breakneck speed back then, so the 4-5 years between the machines was practically a light year.

 

Oh and I still adore Rick Dangerous! You know a title did something right for it to still be so fondly remembered by so many. Although, I certainly wouldn't hold it up as a title only the Amiga could do, it is still a damn fine game.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, strider said:

Yeah, but I was working at Tesco and filling shelves in the frozen food section so my wage was well beyond getting something that swanky.

How did you accumulate 70 games for your US SNES in that case?!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rex Grossman said:

How did you accumulate 70 games for your US SNES in that case?!

Simple, a lot of them where second-hand or were from a time when I earned a better wage.

I recall a harddrive costing over £100 (or more) and I wasn't interested in spending that much money on something that already seemed an overly expensive purchase.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The HD's were amazing but a bit shit with pricing. I was extremely lucky that my A600 had a 20MB one built in but it could only hold a few games, something like Monkey Island 2 almost filled it! Made bigger games a joy to play without the disk swapping or loading but even I bought a couple of extra floppy drives as not a lot of games would let you install the games to the hard drive.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, strider said:

Simple, a lot of them where second-hand or were from a time when I earned a better wage.

I recall a harddrive costing over £100 (or more) and I wasn't interested in spending that much money on something that already seemed an overly expensive purchase.

 

I was hoping you'd say you were a very efficient shoplifter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, kernow said:

There's no way the Amiga could compare to true hardware sprites and tiles. 

 

The Amiga DID have true hardware sprites.

 

It just only had 8 of them :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kernow said:

There's no way the Amiga could compare to true hardware sprites and tiles. 

Have to say once you start to see the tile based nature of so much of console game graphics from back then particularly how they affect the animation on many games they become so much less impressive flicking between limited tile sets seems clunky compared to the smoother less colourful but more carefully animated graphics on traditional computer games. (Immortal/Prince of Persia/North &South etc)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, dumpster said:

It is curious how 'Amiga to Console' conversions usually sucked. 


sim city?

i played the Atari st version, I’ve played the SNES version.

 

also: Populous?

never played more than the demo at best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Lorfarius said:

I bought a couple of extra floppy drives as not a lot of games would let you install the games to the hard drive.

 

WHDLoad and JST installers were (literally) game changers for the Amiga.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.