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The Trouble with Nintendo. A TL;DR topic.


Transient Curse
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That does seem to be a potential portent of trouble down the road for Nintendo in the portable segment, there was a recent episode of the 8-4 podcast, where the 2 guests were both avid gamers, living in Japan with young kids, neither of them were interested in recent Nintendo stuff and were indicating their kids liked to play on iOS devices, even though one of them had bought a 3DS and Pokémon for his young boy.

Both of them brought up the notion of good enough gaming, might even become a problem for all the console manufacturers over time if merely competent, easily accessible, F2P or cheap gaming content satisfies most potential customers going forward, less people willing to fork out good money for premium priced content.

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Sooo much revisionism...

C64 and Spectrum had epic games WITH saves. Elite was produced in UK 2 full years before NES was even out in UK. And it isnt the only example. There were adventures both text and graphical and point/click like maniac mansion. One of the first games I bought for Vic20 had a save game facility (Pirate adventure cartridge by Scott Adams I think, save was to tape).

This idea that the UK was lover of the NES and Mario and Zelda in the early to late 80s is the worst kind of revisionism that does down our own UK development scene in the early 80s... Noone at my school had a NES it was all C64s, spectrums, bbc micros for the nerds and electrons for nerds with poor parents. Oh and the oddballs with dragon 32, ti99, oric atmos... We had a huge amount of games produced in UK for all these machines from simple 10 minute arcade games upto epic time sinks like Lords of Midnight and Knightlore and Alien 8 and and and ...

Apologies if this comes off as eulogising but I see posts like this regularly talking about the NES in relation to UK when it was almost an irrelevance from 1980-1990... after that when Nintendo started distributing it instead of Mattel it may be a different matter but by then the 8 bit home computer generation was on its last legs.

We should embrace our 8 bit home computer development industry that thrived and produced alot of talent still around today... instead of papering over it with phrases like "10 minute, arcade focused home computer games of the 80s"... you can argue that the majority were, but then the VAST majority of NES games were too!

This probably belongs in "Retro" I know :)

I was planning on responding with something similar, but I'm glad you did because you covered everything far more eloquently than I could have. Growing up in the late '80s and early '90s all of my friends had home computers (Spectrums, Commodores or Amigas - I had an ST, alas) and only one had a console - a Master System. By the mid-90s I knew two with Mega Drives and one with a SNES, but it wasn't until the Playstation era that consoles really took over (and the home computers were replaced with IBM compatibles).

Oddly, my memories of gaming aren't limited to 10 minute arcade games. The idea that all of us with home computers were stuck with short-lived gaming experiences waiting for Nintendo to save us is, well, a little misguided. It does get frustrating seeing the history of games in Europe regularly misrepresented.

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They have to give people some reason to buy the more expensive models, they stopped talking about loss making portable hardware when they released the XL model, I'm curious to see if the 2DS is a marginally profitable model, but nobody has released a guestimate on it. The original 3DS became loss making at a mere $66 markup to guestimated material costs.

Nobody but Europe is doing these digital freebie deals on portable hardware either, either Europe is ahead, or behind the demand curve, why otherwise give away a flagship game.

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Long tail innit? Another reason would be as an inducement to buy other less popular games and register on their network, which removes a major hurdle in selling people higher margin digital delivery content going forward, which is one way to increase profitability in the face of flat or declining revenue.

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I spent £300 on a Wii U the other day and I can sit and ponder on the future of the console and probably depress myself or enjoy the games and figure that even worst case scenario I'll get my 300 quid back in entertainment.

I mean I've got 3D World, Mario Bros U, as well as both Galaxies and Skyward Sword that I never got to play on the Wii. Even if I never played another game on it I'd be happy.

If I was 14 and could only have one console though, no way. You always want to own the machine that's got the longest lifespan.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Can't wait till we can start complaining for a whole 'nother year.

Let's start. First Nintendo lost a court case and now has to pay fees for every 3DS sold.

..and here's some 19 year olds opinion telling Nintendo to go mobile.

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Sooo much revisionism...C64 and Spectrum had epic games WITH saves. Elite was produced in UK 2 full years before NES was even out in UK. And it isnt the only example. There were adventures both text and graphical and point/click like maniac mansion. One of the first games I bought for Vic20 had a save game facility (Pirate adventure cartridge by Scott Adams I think, save was to tape).This idea that the UK was lover of the NES and Mario and Zelda in the early to late 80s is the worst kind of revisionism that does down our own UK development scene in the early 80s... Noone at my school had a NES it was all C64s, spectrums, bbc micros for the nerds and electrons for nerds with poor parents. Oh and the oddballs with dragon 32, ti99, oric atmos... We had a huge amount of games produced in UK for all these machines from simple 10 minute arcade games upto epic time sinks like Lords of Midnight and Knightlore and Alien 8 and and and ...Apologies if this comes off as eulogising but I see posts like this regularly talking about the NES in relation to UK when it was almost an irrelevance from 1980-1990... after that when Nintendo started distributing it instead of Mattel it may be a different matter but by then the 8 bit home computer generation was on its last legs.We should embrace our 8 bit home computer development industry that thrived and produced alot of talent still around today... instead of papering over it with phrases like "10 minute, arcade focused home computer games of the 80s"... you can argue that the majority were, but then the VAST majority of NES games were too!This probably belongs in "Retro" I know :) m...

This. TBH, I don't think I even knew the NES existed at the time, despite owning a game boy from around 1988. It simply wasn't pushed by anyone and a mate said he recalls only toys r us round our way selling the thing. The master system was more prevalent, but Sega only became mainstream with sonic on the MD. Consoles in this country only took off with the 16bit era, the 8 bit belonged to spectrum, c64, amstrad and the bbc.

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So, Alien: Isolation isn't coming to the machine.

"Right now, we don't have plans to put the game on Wii U," Creative Assembly wrote onTwitter. No further explanation was given.

Jesus, Nintendo, this is a Sega published game, one of your last few 3rd party supporters. The scanner is a perfect fit for the gamepad. Why are they not talking to them and getting the game on the system?

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