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Lothar Hex

Ashens' Old Joystick Roundup

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I had the awesome quickshot arcade stick at 18:39, very cool. I had a 48K and 16K spectrum at the time and it was about the same size as the machine itself. We went through a bunch of these (belo) but I think it was the best joystick for the spec, it had those weak contacts in the base though, I can remember sellotaping one of the legs back on as a temp fix as they were doomed to die a quick death when playing combat school.

Compared to the one button Atari 2600 joystick it was awesome. Eventually I settled on the megadrive pad for the amiga.

Sinclair_Spectrum_SpectravideoJoy_1.jpg

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The Atari sticks are awesome. Loads of those old sticks were bobbins. Speed Kings are terrible for diagonals and kill your hand if you have to hit the fire button a lot.

'The Arcade' is probably my favourite one-button stick.

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I went through loads of these. £7.99 from Argos as I recall.

cheetah125joystickboxed-2469.jpg

It was fucking dreadful.

It was indeed a terrible joystick, but one that was also impressive, as it was the only Spectrum joystick I came across that supported multiple fire buttons. I 'think' Ikari Warriors was the only game I saw that support this, though.

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That doesn't look too bad actually.

When you look back at some of the shite controllers that were on sale in the 8 bit days it really puts the "PS3 controllers are abysmal" rants into perspective.

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I had the quickshot II turbo for the speccy.

Does anyone else remember a fun article that Crash ran back in the day? Basically they used Daley Thompson Decathalon as a joystick killer to compare the different models.

Fun days.

Cheers

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I actually fist pumped when the zipstick made an appearance :facepalm:

Gotta agree about the major blindspot regarding analogue joysticks, though. He should feel pretty foolish for giving the Konix speedking such a slating, without having realised it was actually a proper analogue stick.

Yes, it was a weird design, but it had a few notable good features. For one, it was probably the only affordable analogue stick on the market at the time. The Amiga didn't have many games that supported analogue, so to shell out a king's ransom for a flight stick (like that gravis I guess!) wasn't really sensible for most playground warriors. The Konix was reasonably priced, and whilst the stick was a bit odd, it actually performed better than all of the PC flight sticks I went through when I graduated to the big box scene. I often wished I could use my trusty old Konix on my PC when consigning the latest PC flightstick to the bin.

Second, although he kept banging on about the single button issue, he again fails to recognise that the Amiga supported two buttons. It's just that very few joysticks had them. The Konix did.

I had lots of fun with my Konix speedking playing Stunt Car Racer and Knights of the Sky. It was a good little stick that he's completely missed the point of.

Still, zipstick love gets him cred from me :wub:

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I understand the love for the zip stick, for 'proper' old skool players I guess it'll always be between it and the comp pro for moniker of definitive joystick. The comp pro all the way for me though, it felt better in the hand and wore in better, imo. The zips angular design felt odd and for me was just there simply to differentiate itself from the comp pro, which afaik they ripped off in the first place.

The gravis flight stick was the rolls royce of pc flight sticks at the time. This was before all this 1000 button, safety caps n all joysticks. It had a fantastic grip and feel, with wonderful build quality. In fact I'm looking at it now as I have it on my desk! Playing Tie Fighter with it was a total joy. :)

Anyway, foolish doesn't cover how much of a dick that guy must feel regarding analogue joysticks. If you're going to pass comment on things and then put them up on the net, for goodness sake know what you're talking about!

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I loved the Powerplay Cruiser, clearly superior to the ZipStick. I don't think I ever knew that you had to lift the stick up to turn the collar - I think I just forced it :blush: . I note Ashens' one has the suckers on the bottom removed. My older brother perfected a kind of uber-sulk when I beat him at Sensi or Bip, whereby he would throw his Cruiser at the screen, base first - 6/10 it would stick there as he stormed out.

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I had to google the Cruiser - didn't remember the name but do remember the joystick. I was never keen on it. It wasn't *bad* but I didn't like the feel - I seem to remember creaking plastic being a feature.

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I understand the love for the zip stick, for 'proper' old skool players I guess it'll always be between it and the comp pro for moniker of definitive joystick. The comp pro all the way for me though, it felt better in the hand and wore in better, imo.

I preferred the microswitched fire buttons on the Zipstick.

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I had zipstick and cruiser; the zipstick was my favourite, but I'd happily use either.

I could never get on with Competition Pros, they felt far too stiff and resistive to me. So the zipstick was perfect; they copied the well-designed body, but made it all clicky :wub:

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The worst one we ever had (and I have no idea where it came from) wasn't too dissimilar in concept to the turtle shown in the video - it had a grapefruit sized hemisphere instead of a stick that you were supposed to use your entire hand to control. Bloody awful.

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I preferred the microswitched fire buttons on the Zipstick.

Aye that was cool. Still, I prefered the metal contacts in the comp. I could fire much more rapidly and you could always fine tune them by opening the case and bending them some more. :) Microswitches weren't so easy to get back then either so if they broke, you were screwed.

This would be perfect fodder for retro sites to cover. I'd love someone to trace the history of Kempston, find out the people involved and who designed stuff. Another reason to be proud of the British industry around then.

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I'm going to have to defend the Cheetah 125+

It may be rose tinted, but I remember it being a good stick which didn't knacker your hands like the micro switched sticks.

:blah:

I'll join you in defending Cheetah sticks in general. I had the standard 125 and a Mach 1, and I preferred them to the Quickshot II. Flying Shark also supported the 125+ and its extra button.

Never liked the Konix odd shapes, could not get comfortable with them.

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Gotta agree about the major blindspot regarding analogue joysticks, though. He should feel pretty foolish for giving the Konix speedking such a slating, without having realised it was actually a proper analogue stick.

I honestly never knew that the Konix Speedking was an analogue joystick... :blink:

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There were two versions of it, so you're forgiven for that - you probably never saw the analogue one.

To hold one in your hand and not be able to work out that one's analogue though? Schoolboy error.

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quickshot_proefessional_2-player_board_qs-128f_620x660.JPG

Was my weapon on choice for the Amiga. It was absolutely perfect for SWOS, it never retained that lovely new clicky feel for very long though, I seem to recall getting through quite a few of them over the years.

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I can't for the life of me find a photo of the Quickshot interchangable i had.

It had these rubber interchangable sticks. One of which was a lovely rubber ball thing, another was a thin stick

I recall i bought in from Alders in Croydon when they had computer stuff on the very top floor. Happy times.

Croydon was the nuts then.

I mostly used a Speedking after that

*edit*

ah its in the video after the 2 review

*edit 2*

The point about the Maverick having 1 or 2 players was so C64 users (at least) didn't have to take the joystick out if it required Port 1 (wihch everyone knows wasn't the de facto standard)

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Got my 464 from Allders back then. They did indeed have an awesome computer department. The whole store was brilliant in fact.

Now we all look at stuff on screens, press buttons to buy it and get it delivered to our doors. Depressing.

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OMG respect level down to -100 now! Just seen he hasn't a clue about the Gravis analogue flightstick!! Bloody hell. :o:lol::facepalm:

Anyway, foolish doesn't cover how much of a dick that guy must feel regarding analogue joysticks

Somehow I think he'll be able to sleep at night.

Do you watch other Ashens videos? It's very light-hearted stuff, he never claims to be an authority on anything. He just shows stuff in front of his brown couch. He isn't educating or informing. You either get pangs of nostalgia about the joysticks or you don't.

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