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Oculus Rift (VR Headset)


roskelld
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I'm going to try it out tonight. So far I've got that, Minecraft, Half Life 2 and all of the demos to try. Is there anything else obvious as a good demonstration of it that I'm missing?

That's a good list to start with. I did play Crysis for the first time last night using the Tridef drivers on the Rift (there is a 14 day demo so worth trying once you're all set-up) and it was a lot of fun.

I did find that for the first few days anything involving walking in the Rift (so HL2 etc) would give me motion sickness pretty damn quickly. I found the on rails or vehicle controls much more satisfying in terms of not making me sick, but mileage may vary. Therefore of all the demos the ones that I would be trying initially are:

Titans of Space

Rift Coaster

First Law

Heli Hell

Outerra

VR Cinema3D

Delta Draconis

Greebles

Blue Marble

and then progress onto more demanding things such as HL2, Crysis, Metro Last Light etc. Oh and don't forget to give this a go, it's a bit creepy but highly impressive:

http://ir-ltd.net/ir-oculus-rift-vr-demo/

While not everything with 'patched in support' may be as good as things designed with the Rift in mind it's still impressive what things like Tridef drivers have achieved. With a little fiddling things can look very good and play well. In a perfect world in something like Crysis you would want to detach looking from where the gun is being aimed, but as it stands it essentially is just using the head to control mouse movement but still works very well. For instance with Crysis I was able to use a 360 controller for general control and movement, the head tracking for looking around (but mostly just things that are in front of me, so limited head movement), then if I want to turn around more than 90 degrees or so I use the right analogue on the controller and (THIS IS IMPORTANT) gently turn my head in the direction I'm moving the controller so at least my head is moving in that direction which seems to cure any motion sickness issues. Then after I have turned to face the new direction I gently turn my head forward again while compensating with the controller. Arrrgggg, it's difficult to describe but you will figure it out, in essence when making bigger turns with joypad or mouse (as you don't want to have to turn around in real life to face backwards all the time otherwise you will get in a right tangle) always do a slight movement of your head in the same direction at the same time.

Hope that makes at least a little sense, and have fun with the demos. Remember to run in 1080p if your PC can handle it....and at the first sign of motion sickness take a break for a while, never try and push through it,.

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I'm a wuss with motion sickness (can't play Halo on the Xbox at all), so this works me a bit. However, 1080p @60fps solid is a good target to shoot for with building a new PC later this year.

Being a stereoscopic display, you need to run at double the frame rate compared to bog standard displays, so as the consumer version is 1080p, you'll need enough power to push 120fps to get the smoothness of normal 60fps, kinda makes wanting console support for this rather redundant, unless people want to put up with subpar performance or visuals.

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Ah this is great news. I hope that's Carmack upped sticks and moved properly for this. Oculus are so promising, their product is maybe even my most anticipated development in gaming as a whole today. Honestly its got me excited again and having the brain of ID Software come into their fold is just nothing but good vibes as i see it. Especially after the rumoured distancing both parties had over the strife with Oculus Rifts Doom 3 BFG support.

Also I can finally stop torturing myself with trying to make up seemingly endless, blindly but well intentioned excuses on why I should keep looking forward to more and more Dooms and Quakes now. Feeling slight freedom is over me after reading this :)

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The 1080p screen is split across both eyes. You don't need 120fps. You need 1080p@60.

I think you're mixing up fps and Hz there. Mushashi's talking about GPU workload, not the properties of the screen. You need to render every frame twice (once for each eye); it doesn't matter that both images are shown on the same screen.

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It will matter, however, that the GPU is rendering to essentially half the screen size for each eye, so things like fill rate will only be marginally affected. GPUs can pump out a smaller screen much quicker. I'm not sure on the finer tech details, but you won't need enough power to render 1080p at 120 fps.

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Well I've just tried it for the first time and I'm very impressed. It was waiting on my doorstep when I got back from the airport last night. God knows how long it'd been there. Anyway, yes. It's good!

I've only tried a few demos so far and the effect is almost enough to make you forget that it's not 1080p. I'm finding it less easy to ignore the motion blur and I think they'll need to make sure that the screen they select for the final retail unit has a very low pixel latency. I'm probably overly sensitive to noticing that, but I do wonder if that's part of the motion sickness problem that some people have had. So my early verdict is that as a demonstration of the technology, it's actually astounding. But I don't think I could play a game on this version of the device. Having said that, I still need to fiddle with it a bit, so impressions may change AND despite all that, I can't wait to put it back on.

I kind of don't know what to play with next! Kid-in-sweetshop syndrome.

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I think you're mixing up fps and Hz there. Mushashi's talking about GPU workload, not the properties of the screen. You need to render every frame twice (once for each eye); it doesn't matter that both images are shown on the same screen.

I think his point is that it's only got to render 1920x1080 at 60fps as each eye is 960x1080. Your PC/console won't need to push out 1080p at 120fps.

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Yes, what petrolgirls said. The consumer Rift demands 960x1080x60Hz, per eye. That's half the work (approximately) of 1080p/120Hz, or about the same amount of work as 1080p/60Hz. The Rift doesn't render two full 1080p images then halve them in size for each eye; that would be rather wasteful.

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Oh, I see what you mean. Well I suppose the assumption may be on my part because I understood that the full resolution was indeed rendered once for each eye to account for the necessary distortion on each side of the screen. Certainly this "120fps capable" hardware requirement has been bandied about on the oculus forums since I started following developments.

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You'd do the distortion before rendering anything to the buffer, which would be the job of the Rift drivers and the GPU, but that's much less of a bottleneck than the raw fill rate. The result is a slightly more expensive version of the matrix used to scale to a given resolution, so in effect each eye should be much the same as rendering to a 960x1080 buffer.

At least, that's my understanding of it.

Away from the GPU, I imagine there will be an increased demand if the engine has to determine the view for each eye. That sort of wizardry is a dark and arcane magick I dare not touch.

(i.e. I don't have a clue about it)

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Away from the GPU, I imagine there will be an increased demand if the engine has to determine the view for each eye. That sort of wizardry is a dark and arcane magick I dare not touch.

I was pondering this, which is why I put an '(approximately)' caveat in my earlier post.
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Is it normal for the image to be out of focus towards the edge? Is that just a side effect of the lenses? I've adjusted everything I can, but nothing seems to allow me to have the entire image in focus.

Yes. Essentially to compensate for this I tend to look with my head rather than just move eyes around,(i.e.keep my focus looking forwards at all times). I don't even notice now.

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