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We ♥ Phantasy Star Online

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This is a thread for fans of PSO to reminisce about the best game ever and somewhere to post cool stuff that's not really appropriate in threads in Discussion or Online. Such as...

This lovely looking new RAcaseal figure by Bandai with loads of cool accessories!

This one comes assembled, unlike the recent spate of snap together kits from Kotobukiya.

j2tcT7Ty02jYs.jpg

http://sagittariolucente.minus.com/l2tcT7Ty02jYs

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A chap called Umran recently started a thread on PSO World to show off his Panoramic Landscape screenshots, created from PSO Blue Burst as part of his design PHD. Here's a direct link to the full size images, along with a quote of the original post from PSO World. These are really impressive.

http://umran.minus.com/mTm36lhIJ/1g

Just want to share some of my PSO:BB panorama's I made a while back' date=' I've been a PS fan even since I was given PS1 for the master system as a 8 year old.....in total for about 24 years (crap I sound old).

I'm currently undertaking a PhD in Virtual Natural Environment design in games, and one part has been creating a visual chronology (3 volume book called Virtual Landscapes) of some amazing natural landscapes in games, I couldn't leave out the Phantasy Star Universe!....

I remember playing PSO EP2, listening to (Jungle-A lush load), standing near the cliffs and looking at the amazing skies and thinking the game was simply stunning(music matched the visuals perfectly), and then thinking there must be something in these virtual natural landscapes worth discussing and sharing.....

Anyway, You can download them in full Ultra HD res of minus.com either individually or as a full zip..... Anyway hope you enjoy!

Full folder: http://umran.minus.com/mTm36lhIJ/1g

Examples....

jWIyjwwT8f9sw.jpg

jbef8SD9tSrt1s.jpg

jinTFtmeZqcn0.jpg

jbjM2VH7jhC3X4.jpg

jHOmoYvUeyooJ.jpg

jb0N37WEOadDPk.jpg

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Loving those pics, just interesting to see views that you couldn't see before having played through them for hundreds of hours.

My fave pic...ah the memories! Is that green in her hair a bug, I don't remember that from the console versions.

red_ring_rico_by_kireekpso-d3ei5eb.jpg

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Thanks for starting this thread!

Best team ever, 2000-2002:

post-663-0-06720400-1343754953.jpg

(Obviously those fastest times were done by arrant cheats.)

I would have loved to have done some challenge mode back in the day. Just about the only thing on PSO I didn't get around to doing.

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I've waffled plenty about PSO over the years. It really was something that hit the nail square on the head, for so many reasons. There aren't many games I think back on with such fondness - even amongst other favourites. I've played plenty of great games over the years but PSO is one of a tiny handful that are very special to me.

(I've still got that character from GK's pic on a memory card and occasionally I'll fire up a Cube or Wii and wallow nostalgically for a while).

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Loving those pics, just interesting to see views that you couldn't see before having played through them for hundreds of hours.

My fave pic...ah the memories! Is that green in her hair a bug, I don't remember that from the console versions.

Nah, she always had a green streak in her hair.

pso_red_ring_rico_wallpaper1024.jpg

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It was sad when the DC versions/s got spoilt by duping/etc and realising it was over. i got NOL'd near the end too and had no back up, which was the single most upsetting gaming experience I have ever had. The time and effort that went into that level 80 odd character...the memories...all gone. I half heartedly started again, but it wasn't the same.

The sad end for me is completely overshadowed by the good times though. It was my first online gaming experience, I was never into PC gaming. What a way to start, eh? It felt so fresh and exiting...playing with people from around the world. And being able to communicate with them! To play it was special, especially the camaraderie, the help, the bond you made with people you'd never met, that you didn't know how they looked or sounded...made it all the more mysterious and enforced a sense of wonder with it all. And then you passed on that good feeling with noobs, helping them with weapons and mags and acted like a minder, ging on runs with them, letting them get all the XP and watching their levels shoot up. I remember not going to bed and going straight to work, coming home and doing it all again. Cue upwards of £200 dial up phone bills. Never was a game more worth it though. I do feel privelidged in a way to have played it at it's peak....if the Vita version of PSO2 even comes close, I'll be happy. Can't wait to resurrect my beloved HUmar Logaan from his 12 year (has it really been that long?!) rest.

vortex.jpg

The noise that accompanied the loading screen...still gives me butterflies now thinking about it...nervous that my DC was going to overheat, reset and corrupt my save. Fucking thing!

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It was sad when the DC versions/s got spoilt by duping/etc and realising it was over. i got NOL'd near the end too and had no back up, which was the single most upsetting gaming experience I have ever had. The time and effort that went into that level 80 odd character...the memories...all gone. I half heartedly started again, but it wasn't the same.

The sad end for me is completely overshadowed by the good times though. It was my first online gaming experience, I was never into PC gaming. What a way to start, eh? It felt so fresh and exiting...playing with people from around the world. And being able to communicate with them! To play it was special, especially the camaraderie, the help, the bond you made with people you'd never met, that you didn't know how they looked or sounded...made it all the more mysterious and enforced a sense of wonder with it all. And then you passed on that good feeling with noobs, helping them with weapons and mags and acted like a minder, ging on runs with them, letting them get all the XP and watching their levels shoot up. I remember not going to bed and going straight to work, coming home and doing it all again. Cue upwards of £200 dial up phone bills. Never was a game more worth it though. I do feel privelidged in a way to have played it at it's peak....if the Vita version of PSO2 even comes close, I'll be happy. Can't wait to resurrect my beloved HUmar Logaan from his 12 year (has it really been that long?!) rest.

vortex.jpg

The noise that accompanied the loading screen...still gives me butterflies now thinking about it...nervous that my DC was going to overheat, reset and corrupt my save. Fucking thing!

This sums it up for me too, perfect.

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shit dont even start me. (check my avatar!)

1000+ hrs in DC PSO and a massive phonebill to boot! THe Ragol Raiders, our clan, nicest bunch of folks ever, and the icon contests, ha what a hoot! Online literally has never been that good since.

pso1.jpg

pso2x.jpg

psoi.jpg

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Online literally has never been that good since.

This is key for me. I think because PSO was my first experience playing online and it was a co-operative game (let's forget the throwaway Battle Mode added later) it set the foundation for my expectations of online gaming, and maybe I've never cared much for competitive stuff as a result. Aside from the fact that it tends to bring out the worst in people, I just don't get much fun out of playing against others online. All my enjoyable online experiences since have been teaming up with one or more friends and taking on a game itself.

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One of the big things for me was the anonimity we don't have now. No voice comms, no avatars, no bio, no webcam...just text. Which added to it...it added to the mystery, as if you were in character. Or more that the illusion wasn't broken.

Which is another reason i'm looking forward to the Vita version...just an on screen keyboard would be perfect.

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As well as being a lot of players' first experience of online gaming, I think it's equally important that it was also Sega's first experience of online gaming. It's as if Sonic Team took the basic template of any other Sega arcade style title - bright bold graphics and simple but fun play mechanics - and added the various character classes, online multiplayer and random item drop rates for complexity and longevity. At its heart, PSO is really quite a short and simple game.

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Nice retrospective interview with Yuji Naka from 2011 here regarding the development of PSO:

http://www.gamestm.c...sy-star-online/

The full article is spoilered below.

With a sequel announced at Tokyo Game Show, we sit down with famed Phantasy Star creator, Yuji Naka, as well as Phantasy Star Oline’s main designer and art director, Satoshi Sakai to discuss the making of an era-defining RPG classic.

Yuji Naka is the king of his own world and he knows it. He carries himself with the relaxed, confident attitude of a man who feels that failure is impossible. He is informal and passionate. His formal, considered conversational style betrays the fast-and-loose speech of his Kansai heritage. Whether it’s his fame or sheer natural ability, the 45-year old game designer knows how to secure the full attention of everyone in the room. It’s that kind of leadership he brought to his teams when he created the most popular games ever to come out of Sega, the two most important of which are, without a doubt, Sonic The Hedgehog and Phantasy Star. Both games were so successful that, even in Naka’s absence (he left the company in 2006), Sega is still trying to replicate their secret formula.

We meet Naka on the first floor of the main building on Sega’s campus, located in a nondescript and fairly quiet Tokyo business district. Young employees who never had the chance to work with Naka gawk and stare, while trying to pretend they didn’t notice. Even though he doesn’t work there any more, Naka carries himself like he owns the place. The only moment where his calm seems to fade is when he’s asked to put on a visitor’s badge. “Does that feel strange?” we ask him. “Yeah. A little,” he replies with a laugh.

We’re at Sega to talk about Phantasy Star Online with Naka and art director Satoshi Sakai. The game turns ten years old this month, and, even though we didn’t know it at the time of our interview, Sega was preparing to shut down the last servers for the original Phantasy Star Online – or PSO: Blue Burst as the PC version is now called – after years of expansion packs.

Sakai and Naka’s involvement with the game’s original incarnation ended years ago, and Sega is now a very different company than it was during its time as a hardware manufacturer. At that time, even before production work had begun on PSO, Naka’s team was split into three after the completion of Sonic Adventure. One group focused solely on pushing the graphical capabilities of the Dreamcast to their limits, another looked into the possibility of an online game, and the third worked on various projects that would eventually lead to the creation of Chu Chu Rocket. “Everyone was spread out doing their own thing in the studio,” says Naka. But, eventually, these three teams came together for Phantasy Star Online.

Not that they had much choice. “Word came from the top that we had to make an online game,” said Naka. At the time, Sega was headed by Isao Okawa, who declared that 2000 would be the year of the network game. Unfortunately, the teams were spread pretty thin at that point. “The Sakura Wars team had to keep making Sakura Wars, the Jet Set Radio team had to do Jet Set Radio.

Everybody was hoping somebody else would do it.” Despite the fact that Sonic Team wasn’t the best fit for the project, Okawa gave the responsibility to Naka’s team. Not everyone was thrilled, but as Naka put it, “Okawa had a clear vision of the future.” There was just one issue: nobody knew what online gaming meant in 2000. While PC online gaming had been around for decades, and truly exploded in the mid-Nineties, the PC-free game culture of Japan had never shown much interest. Not only did the team have to create a new genre, it had to sell online gaming to a country of console gamers. It wasn’t going to be an easy sell, given that the internet service providers in Japan charged a per-minute fee for dial-up, and broadband was almost unheard of at the time. According to Sakai, Okawa showed the courage of his convictions by bundling a year’s worth of internet access free with each Dreamcast. In the end, it cost Sega nothing, because Okawa paid for it from his own pocket. Naka suggests that the chairman felt that strongly about it, it really was going to be the next big thing.

Naka knew he had to make an online game, but what did that mean? How do you play a game online? How do you communicate? How do you relay the story? What did the phrase ‘online game’ mean in 2000? “Cheap graphics,” he replies. Stark and boring visuals were associated with online games at the time. “Even today, that’s the case. That’s why I had my graphics team and online team separate, but I decided to combine their skills into one game and have both graphics and online together.” The combination would eventually prove to be nearly unstoppable, but that wasn’t a forgone conclusion. If the game was to use all the power of the Dreamcast, he needed his art team behind him. That’s where Sakai came in.

At the time, the game was simply called Third World. Though the team was aiming to create a sci-fi atmosphere, no one thought of associating it with the long-dormant Phantasy Star series, which hadn’t seen a release since the Mega Drive era. According to Sakai, “I knew it would be 3D and it couldn’t look cheap. I wanted to do sci-fi fantasy. That, with the freedom of online gameplay, worked together. It had a comic-like look to it at first, but we couldn’t show off our realistic art like that. So we made it more realistic.” When creating concept art for the game, Sakai drew a dragon and, when Naka saw the image, something clicked. The Third World became Phantasy Star Online.

A simple idea, a name, and some concept art don’t form a game. Naka needed to figure out how the gameplay would work, and was in a position that very few game makers ever find themselves: he was doing something completely unlike what any of his peers had ever done. While Western gamers today often look at the online components that come out of Japanese games and infer that online-play isn’t important in Japan, in 2000 it was non-existent. Naka had to look outside his own country for inspiration, something that, until quite recently, no Japanese game maker would ever do – or at least admit to. In 2000, there were really only three big names in online RPGs: Ultima, Everquest, and Diablo. And it was the latter loot-gathering classic that would serve as inspiration for PSO.

Diablo had impressed Naka because the game surprised him on not just a gameplay level, but a technical one as well. “The biggest issue with online games was memory. They require a lot of it, and the graphics suffer as a result. I was impressed with how smooth the gameplay of Diablo was, but it was a 2D game. We wanted a game with Dreamcast graphics and the same level of gameplay as Diablo.” It also helped that the main programmer on the game was an addict of Blizzard’s loot-whoring masterpiece.

Ten years on, it’s easy to look back and see the gameplay connections between PSO and Diablo, but very few critics pointed it out at the time. Part of the reason was the lack of overlap between the console-focused audience of PSO, and the PC game-focused Diablo audience. The graphics also played a role; PSO looked nothing like Diablo and the inspiration drawn from it was purely mechanical. PSO’s artistic direction came from somewhere else.

The freedom available to Sega teams during the Dreamcast era is hard to imagine in today’s stricter, higher-stakes environment. Teams were left with little supervision, to create the kind of games they wanted to make. It produced some of the all-time classics of the console, including Jet Set Radio, Space Channel 5 and Phantasy Star Online.

Sakai’s art team was also free. Most of the staff from Phantasy Star IV had left Sega by the time PSO production was underway. With the sense that 3D was a new start for videogame art, the team felt little obligation to adhere to the style set down in the game’s 16-bit predecessors. “Phantasy Star has changed from game to game with each title. I and II might have been similar, but the designers had a lot of freedom. We had only the fixed image of sci-fi RPG,” says Sakai. What little influence that was apparent came in the name of enemy and item names. Naka and Sakai believed that too many things were different to allow more influence. The platform, graphics, even genre (action-RPG versus RPG, a distinction that’s very clear to Naka) was different.

Sakai often mentions freedom within PSO itself. For him, everything came together in just the right way. The game had the right combination of setting, art, and gameplay, to give the player an unparalleled sense of freedom. Players were free to explore as they saw fit, and Sakai claims that the game’s art and sci-fi fantasy setting only work to heighten this sensation. By the time production finished, the team felt that they had created something truly new and original. They were quite proud of it, but they had no way of knowing how the public would react. The free internet included with the game, thanks to Okawa, would certainly move sales in Japan, but they weren’t all 100 per cent confident. Sega wasn’t too concerned with sales abroad. At the time, Japanese publishers made games for Japan, and any sales on top of the domestic ones were just a bonus.

As it turned out, they needn’t have worried; the game sold almost exactly as many units as Sega was expecting. Naka was actually a little disappointed by this: “To be honest, I wanted the game to sell a little more. But actually we sold as much as we could handle. After release, the server load was borderline. Any more and the game would have crashed.” Naka’s perfectionism comes out as he talks about the game’s performance. Despite selling well and winning numerous awards, he still doesn’t seem satisfied, even ten years on. “The team probably didn’t have the right knowledge, because everything was new to them. There were provider problems as well. In Hiroshima and Okayama the network didn’t work right and they had to investigate these new kinds of problems. It was stressful.”

Naka’s exacting expectations of himself aside, the game sold miraculously well in an era where ‘console’ meant offline gaming almost by definition, and the fan base that it created was perhaps the most fervent and rabid until World Of Warcraft came along. That, if nothing else, pleased and surprised Naka. “We on the development team were surprised. Originally, we aimed to offer twenty days of gameplay. So we gave the first month free. No one cared that the free trial was only a month; they kept on playing. Twenty days was the target for one character. People made multiple characters and started over.”

The game pleased critics as well. PSO took home 17 awards, including top honours at the Japanese Game Awards. Unfortunately, the game’s chief champion Okawa didn’t live to see the game win. While PSO was in production, Okawa was in poor health, and he was hospitalised by the time the game was released. Naka said, “I was making reports and sending pictures to the hospital, but Okawa was probably too sick to see them. Three days after he died, PSO won the Japan Game Award.”

Despite all the acclaim and the loss of their biggest supporter, the team received no break. They went to work maintaining the overworked PSO servers, while working a gruelling schedule that enabled them to release Phantasy Star Online Version 2 in less than six months. Work on PSO never really stopped. The game was ported to the PC, GameCube, and Xbox. Even after those versions shut down (as well as the Dreamcast version), Sega was pouring work and resources into PSO until December of 2010, when it finally shut down the last servers for the final iteration on PC. On top of building up the original game, Sega expanded the franchise to include Phantasy Star Portable for the PSP, Phantasy Star Zero for DS, and the critically panned Phantasy Star Universe on Xbox 360 and PC.

The series has struggled to live up to the legacy of the original game. While Sega was busy trying to top PSO, Capcom stole its thunder by taking the formula and adapting it into Monster Hunter. For various cultural reasons, the ad hoc gameplay of Monster Hunter on PSP proved to be far more popular in Japan than online could ever hope to be. By the time Sega realised the right direction to take the series, it was too late and Phantasy Star was stuck playing catch-up to Monster Hunter. At the same time, the PSP Phantasy Star games have failed to capture the attention of the West, and Sega is incredibly slow to localise and release them. It seems that only the hardcore fans, who created their own private PSO servers after the game was shut down, are keeping the series alive.

Now no longer working at Sega and heading his own studio at Prope – which recently released both Let’s Tap and Ivy The Kiwi? for Wii – Naka doesn’t seem to mind the series’ fortunes, as long as the game’s fans remember what he achieved. “As the game creator, Diablo influenced us and we wanted to create something better. I’m happy to see others take what we did and work with it. I’m the kind of creator who wants to do something first. If I do something and others follow, I’m happy. If there was no PSO, Monster Hunter wouldn’t have come out. I feel I’m lucky. You have to be there in the right place at the right time. For the younger generation it’s difficult, there’s so much out there already. I was lucky to have the chance to do that first.”

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Everyone in this thread better be getting the Vita game [shakes fist]!

Such amazing memories. I was such a frothing fan, I wrote a mini-review published in Official Dreamcast Magazine, and the ed. said something like, "We got tons of submissions but this was the most gushing" :D

If anyone still has the issue (I think it has Daytona on the cover) It'd be cool if you could scan it in...

I agree with everyone above: the fact it was a proper, proper Sega game that just happened to be online, and was 100% co-op, marked it out. I've been waiting for something similar ever since - a drop-in, drop-out multiplayer arcade RPG that repeats the same experiences frequently, but tougher each time.

I bought a US copy of Final Fantasy XI and a PS2 joypad converter, in the desperate hope it'd replicate the PSO experience. Boy, what a crashing let-down that was...

You really feel as though Naka could have taken any Sega franchise and made it into a perfectly-formed online experience. I'm gushing again, aren't I? All I'll say is, I hope the new game retains the things that made the original so special: absolutely NO competitive element; lots of item sharing; rhythm-based attacks; massive player customisation (but clear templated character types); universal translator keyboard!

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I tried to get into this back in the day on DC, I really did, but between the cost of dialup, and the fact that I was put off by what appeared to arena battles seperated by a series of low walls, I couldn't make the leap "into" the game itself.

and when I did, it was just a click-click-click grind and inventory management sim, with a chatroom

I'm sorry, I didn't give it the respect it deserved. I didn't make the emotional investment, and get beyond the mechanics.

I still don't "do" MMORPG type grinds.

(yet I did do a 30hr stint of Dungeon Siege, what's WRONG with me?)

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I tried to get into this back in the day on DC, I really did, but between the cost of dialup, and the fact that I was put off by what appeared to arena battles seperated by a series of low walls, I couldn't make the leap "into" the game itself.

and when I did, it was just a click-click-click grind and inventory management sim, with a chatroom

I'm sorry, I didn't give it the respect it deserved. I didn't make the emotional investment, and get beyond the mechanics.

I still don't "do" MMORPG type grinds.

(yet I did do a 30hr stint of Dungeon Siege, what's WRONG with me?)

Early days my phone bill was massive, my parents didn't like that haha.

I think the main draw for me was how easy it was just to hop online and kill stuff and have the chance of seeing one of those rare red boxes.

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Early days my phone bill was massive, my parents didn't like that haha.

I think the main draw for me was how easy it was just to hop online and kill stuff and have the chance of seeing one of those rare red boxes.

In the disposable income days of my youth and my first 'proper job' I paid for a seperate phone line to be installed in my room so I could play PSO whenever I wanted. :facepalm:

I remember in the early days when me and my brother would play it, one on the keyboard and one on pad. It was just a whole new world at the time, I'd never seen anything like it.

Although for some reason even the Gamecube PSO didn't feel the same, so I fear that no matter how good the Vita version is I'll always be afflicted by these rose-tinted specs...

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I pretty much played them all, Dreamcast (both versions) then hopped over to Gamecube, think there was three revisions total, which was as awesome as the Dreamcast days. I even bought a special controller/keyboard which was very useful. I also played EP3, which was actually a really good game. After that, XBOX, which was still a good laugh with the added voice comms.

I actually played from the early days of Dreamcast to Gamecube to XBOX with a mate who I still have never met in real life. After that I played BB, but was a bit late with that one, ended up setting up my own BB server on my PC so I could play whenever I wanted due to Sega closing it down.

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I think I ran three months of obscene phone bills (first was north of £300) before getting round to ordering an actual internet package from BT. Remember the days of a 2-hour cutoff on dial-up? Everyone timing their games to DC/RC before long levels or bosses :D

I didn't play with Edge forumites on V1 because I was far too lurky back then, but when V2 came out I remember one particular session of lobby football where a certain Durham Red and I played quite competitively while everyone else dossed about. Ms. Red also appeared to be quite drunk and in the subsequent adventure we went on and I kind of fell in love ^_^

Played a lot with The Boye and a chap by the name of Zoltan (Gorf King). We also often hooked up with a character named Skog, who didn't appear to carry on through to the Cube version. Our V2 CMode team was Red, Zoltan, tiptoe and my ranger FatBot.

I remember getting the Cube version a week early from Gamestation because they either didn't know it wasn't supposed to be out, or they didn't care.

I've still got that keyboard/pad combo in the loft. The 'loaf of bread' as someone referred to it. Funnily enough I could never use it the way it was intended and instead played with a pad plugged in as well, picking up the pad/keyboard only to type messages. I could be mistaken, but I think I actually bought it off Pungee, along with the Cube internet adapter / Japanese copy of the game bundle. Our Cube CMode team was my HUcaseal Andromeda, Red, Pungee and Gorf King and it's still the most rewarding gaming experience I've had.

Bunch of photos culled from the HD:

My original HUmar, Sabreman:

TheCrew.jpg

Dreamcast Ryecatcher:

rye1.jpg

A V1 Pal I played with a lot:

RyeKara.jpg

Soapboxing in Blue Burst:

pope.jpg

Maraca-wielding Mofo:

maracawieldingmofo.jpg

Blue Burst Bits:

PsoBB2005-06-1420-01-18-21.jpg

PsoBB2005-05-1316-50-44-20.jpg

PsoBB2005-05-1800-07-26-62.jpg

PsoBB2005-06-1016-19-26-17.jpg

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Soapboxing in Blue Burst:

pope.jpg

Ha! That was the time Pupponvesh tried to enlist the entire population of a lobby into the religion he'd spontaneously decided to set up one night, with him as combined deity / church founder / head of state. I remember all the other crews just stopping what they were doing when his rant began and gathering to stare at him in silence, until the character pictured eventually piped up with the puzzled question you see. It all kind of fell apart after that, but there were a few other screenies of Pup taken in mid-rant in front of his entranced audience before the spell wore off and the absurd possibility of having a 'robot pope' sank in; I think for a minute or so he'd almost convinced them of the wisdom of accepting him as their god. Can never find the pictures now though.

Nice to see my Ursula in there as well. She was a powerful little bugger; I don't think anything Sega do (or anyone does) again can compare to the sight of four forces specialising in different techs blasting their way through Ruins in Ultimate. The violence and non-stop visual battering of the resulting pyrotechnic display made the experience worth having in itself, gameplay elements aside. I'm looking forward to trying out the new PSO, but I somehow doubt anything will live up to that almost zen-like rhythmic lightshow. It's a really vital element of what made the game so great at its best, that incessant rhythm, the repetitive enemy patterns, the over-the-top sounds and the gaudy, eye-searing colours. When you got a team together who knew the game inside out and were fully tooled up, it gave the illusion of some kind of telepathy in the teamwork, and the psychedelic carnage that ensued made PSO in some ways more like a multiplayer Rez / shoot-em-up than an MMORPG or online action title. They've just never really captured that at all in subsequent attempts to develop the series.

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Nice shots Sabes, I can't remember if I played with any of you Mofos regularly or not. Would have been on the GC version if I did I imagine. I shall have to rummage through my old hard drives and see if I have anything, though I don't remember taking many snapshots to be honest though.

I installed Blue Burst on my new PC (made for PSO2) this week. It still looks absolutely beautiful running at full settings, in widescreen via HDMI on my 42" Panny.

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I played PSO a fair bit, but sadly never on Dreamcast. I did own it for Dreamcast, and tried it, but the lag on my dial-up connection made it unplayable (we had a particularly unusable phone line for internet access). I played it single player a little, but naturally as a single player title it was nowhere near as compelling.

It wasn't until I got it on Xbox that I actually played quite a bit of it, which was nowhere near as good as it inexplicably required a monthly fee ON TOP of Xbox Live, and it was far from my first MMO game experience (that honour goes to Planetside). Not that I don't think MMORPGs should have monthly fees as a rule - rather that PSO was so instanced that there was very little justification for one.

I'm actually quite jealous; I wish I'd been part of the first wave of PSO on the Dreamcast.

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