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Details

EA’s revealed the first details of FIFA 13, as well as releasing a few new screens for the game.

Speaking at a recent event in London, producer David Rutter, revealed five major improvements to this years game, including:

More realistic ball control, which will make it more difficult to control a receiving ball with your player, meaning how well you do to control the ball will depend on the strength, speed, ball height and the technical skills of your player.

Another improvement is to Player Impact, this means that all players challenges will be much more realistic, thanks in part to a new set of impact values ​​has been added at the hip and the upper body area.

Complete Dribble, meanwhile, will do away with FIFA 12′s dribble by changing direction habit, making for much more realistic dribbling action. While Tactical Free-Kicks will allow for up to three players to gather around the ball and make fun of the opponent’s defence and goalie. You can now also feint a direct shot and adjust it to a player who comes off the wall.

Finally, Attacking AI, has also been improved meaning that CPU-controlled players now make better running and better better options for passing the ball.

We are told that the above information is only some of what EA has planned for FIFA 13, with much more information expected later this month. We have also been told that the above may not be entirely 100 percent accurate since the original source posted this information before the media embargo.

FIFA 13: Official details arrive, new screens

Electronic Arts today confirmed the ‘five game-changing’ innovations which we revealed in our story last week, as well as confirming that the game will be released on Vita, PS3 with Move Support, Xbox 360 with Kinect support and most other platforms.

“We are perfecting the best sports game in the world with innovations that capture all the drama and unpredictability of real-world football,” said David Rutter, Executive Producer for FIFA 13. “These are game-changing innovations that will revolutionize our artificial intelligence, dribbling, ball control and collisions to create a true battle for possession across the entire pitch, and deliver freedom and creativity in attack.”

As mentioned previously, the game will now come with five major changes to ensure a more realistic game of football, these include:

All-new Attacking Intelligence which enables players to analyse space, work harder and smarter to break down defenses, and think two plays ahead. Players now possess the intelligence to create, curve, or alter runs to capitalize on openings as they occur, make runs that pull defenders out of position to open passing channels for teammates, and better position themselves for new attacking opportunities.

Complete Dribbling which enables players to face their opponent and use precise dribble touches combined with true 360° mobility with the ball, so it’s easier to be more creative and dangerous in 1v1 opportunities. This means players change direction quicker, are more explosive accelerating with the ball, and are more effective shielding defenders for longer stretches.

FIFA 13 1st Touch Control which transforms the way players control the ball, eliminating near-perfect touch for every player on the pitch, and creating variety and uncertainty around ball control. Factors such as defensive pressure, trajectory of the ball, and velocity of the pass now impact a player’s first touch, creating more opportunities for defenders to win back possession.

FIFA 13 Tactical Free Kicks which provides the tools to create dangerous and unpredictable free kicks utilising the most skillful players on the pitch. Position up to three attacking players over the ball and utilise dummy runs and more passing options to create elaborate free kicks. Opponents can counter by adding or subtracting players to the wall, creeping the wall forward, or sending a bullet man to intercept the pass or block the shot.

And finally, the second generation of the Player Impact Engine which expands physical play from just collisions to off-the-ball battles between players. Defenders push and pull for position, and use their size and strength to win possession or force opponents into poor touches and decisions before the ball arrives.

FIFA 13 will also feature:

Improved Career Mode with major changes developed in response to requests from the most passionate fans of the franchise

New features to enhance the massive EA SPORTS FIFA online offering, including improvements to the wildly popular Head-To-Head Seasons mode

Multiple new features and benefits to EA SPORTS Football Club, the live service that is the heartbeat of FIFA

Complete authenticity with more than 500 officially licensed clubs.

FIFA 13 will be available in stores world-wide this fall for the PlayStation 3 with PlayStation Move support, Xbox 360 with Kinect, PlayStation Vita, Wii, PC, PlayStation 2, Nintendo 3DS, PSP, iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and other mobile platforms.

Skill Games

A new addition for FIFA 13 are Skill Games, incorporated into the game using the new physics capabilities that came with the Impact Engine. On the surface it looks like they’re aimed at newcomers to FIFA (which they are) but they should also offer seasoned players a way to see areas of the games controls that they might not know about too. The idea primarily is aimed at teaching people the fundamentals of FIFA, step-by-step cranking up the difficulty of each particular skills area to show you more and more.

There are 32 games across 8 sections, Penalties, Ground Passing, Lobbed Passing, Dribbling, Shooting, Advanced Shooting, Crossing and Free Kicks (I’ve done those from memory so fingers crossed I’ve got them right…) each with three tiers, Gold, Silver and Bronze. The games range from hitting targets, chipping balls into bins, slalom dribbling to football tennis and plenty more including the apparently infamous (within the studio) “Gauntlet” that uses the full pitch and pulls various drills together.

When waiting to go into a match, you’ll no longer be placed into the Arena to have a kick about. Now you’ll be given a Skill Game to play instead. Each game has a target score that you need to achieve to unlock the next tier, and some restrict you to a certain number of attempts or put you against the clock. You pick a player from your set favorite team and then crack on.

The games chosen for you are kind of random initially, but they will start to push you towards skill areas you’ve not made much progress in eventually. If you don’t want to have them generated for you, or there’s a Skill Game you specifically want to work on, you can access them from the main menu, going into the Skill Game hub to manually select challenges. For most players the bronze challenges will be a breeze, but as you progress further, you’ll see plenty of variables chucked at you to keep you on your toes. That could be anything from adding defenders that are actively trying to block your passes at targets, giving you a smaller area to work in, reducing the number of attempts you have or, by turning the control settings to manual. For example in the football tennis game below, you control two players either side of a wall playing manual lobbed passes back and forth. As your score moves up the wall gets higher and the area you can actively play in decreases.

Once you’ve worked your way through the first three tiers you’ll then be faced with the Skill Challenge for that particular section, which in our experiences were brutal (and to be fair, still being tweaked). The ground passing Skill Challenge saw you in control of six players positioned around the edge of the centre circle, with two defenders trying to get the ball off of you. Your passing was set to manual and there was a squared-off perimeter around you, which you couldn’t step outside of or the challenge would end. It would also end if one of the two defenders were able to get a touch on the ball. Each successful pass between your players earned you points, with additional points also being awarded for passes between the two defenders, or by lobbing the ball over them and so on. Your target is to achieve the Legendary rating, which is the highest of four points brackets. At the end of the game your points are totaled and you’re shown your rank, which is then updated to the leaderboards.

The leaderboards can be used to compare your rank against your friends or the global lists, and offer some incentive to return to completed challenges if you’re keen to stay at the top. They’re currently missing any type of autolog or push functionality for telling people when you beat them however, but we pitched the idea to Aaron and he wrote it down so it might make it in. Who knows.

Overall we found the Skill Games in FIFA 13 to be a cool addition and certainly more fun and useful than twatting about in the arena pre-game. In terms of practice they’re a great idea too, for example one challenge puts you just outside the area and fires crosses in at you, allowing for plenty of volley practise, something that’s hard to replicate in a normal match in such volume. The fact that they’ll slowly show people the wider range of controls such as manual settings and crossing modifiers can only be a good thing really and the leaderboards have the potential to keep you coming back to Skill Games if EA can get a notification system working.

Skill Games

A new addition for FIFA 13 are Skill Games, incorporated into the game using the new physics capabilities that came with the Impact Engine. On the surface it looks like they’re aimed at newcomers to FIFA (which they are) but they should also offer seasoned players a way to see areas of the games controls that they might not know about too. The idea primarily is aimed at teaching people the fundamentals of FIFA, step-by-step cranking up the difficulty of each particular skills area to show you more and more.

There are 32 games across 8 sections, Penalties, Ground Passing, Lobbed Passing, Dribbling, Shooting, Advanced Shooting, Crossing and Free Kicks (I’ve done those from memory so fingers crossed I’ve got them right…) each with three tiers, Gold, Silver and Bronze. The games range from hitting targets, chipping balls into bins, slalom dribbling to football tennis and plenty more including the apparently infamous (within the studio) “Gauntlet” that uses the full pitch and pulls various drills together.

When waiting to go into a match, you’ll no longer be placed into the Arena to have a kick about. Now you’ll be given a Skill Game to play instead. Each game has a target score that you need to achieve to unlock the next tier, and some restrict you to a certain number of attempts or put you against the clock. You pick a player from your set favorite team and then crack on.

The games chosen for you are kind of random initially, but they will start to push you towards skill areas you’ve not made much progress in eventually. If you don’t want to have them generated for you, or there’s a Skill Game you specifically want to work on, you can access them from the main menu, going into the Skill Game hub to manually select challenges. For most players the bronze challenges will be a breeze, but as you progress further, you’ll see plenty of variables chucked at you to keep you on your toes. That could be anything from adding defenders that are actively trying to block your passes at targets, giving you a smaller area to work in, reducing the number of attempts you have or, by turning the control settings to manual. For example in the football tennis game below, you control two players either side of a wall playing manual lobbed passes back and forth. As your score moves up the wall gets higher and the area you can actively play in decreases.

Once you’ve worked your way through the first three tiers you’ll then be faced with the Skill Challenge for that particular section, which in our experiences were brutal (and to be fair, still being tweaked). The ground passing Skill Challenge saw you in control of six players positioned around the edge of the centre circle, with two defenders trying to get the ball off of you. Your passing was set to manual and there was a squared-off perimeter around you, which you couldn’t step outside of or the challenge would end. It would also end if one of the two defenders were able to get a touch on the ball. Each successful pass between your players earned you points, with additional points also being awarded for passes between the two defenders, or by lobbing the ball over them and so on. Your target is to achieve the Legendary rating, which is the highest of four points brackets. At the end of the game your points are totaled and you’re shown your rank, which is then updated to the leaderboards.

The leaderboards can be used to compare your rank against your friends or the global lists, and offer some incentive to return to completed challenges if you’re keen to stay at the top. They’re currently missing any type of autolog or push functionality for telling people when you beat them however, but we pitched the idea to Aaron and he wrote it down so it might make it in. Who knows.

Overall we found the Skill Games in FIFA 13 to be a cool addition and certainly more fun and useful than twatting about in the arena pre-game. In terms of practice they’re a great idea too, for example one challenge puts you just outside the area and fires crosses in at you, allowing for plenty of volley practise, something that’s hard to replicate in a normal match in such volume. The fact that they’ll slowly show people the wider range of controls such as manual settings and crossing modifiers can only be a good thing really and the leaderboards have the potential to keep you coming back to Skill Games if EA can get a notification system working.

Quote

Career Mode

We were asked to find out about lots of different things before we went to EAC but the one part of FIFA 13 you all wanted to know about most was Career Mode. That’s why we’re incredibly pleased to bring you this rundown of the modes new features which address many community requests of old and, introduce some truly staggering new technical innovations.

International Management

  • As your reputation as a manager grows in Career Mode you will now be offered the chance to manage International teams in addition to the club side you are already playing with.
  • Your performance and manager reputation in Career Mode dictates the quality of the international offers you will receive.
  • Your nationality and the league you manage in will also effect the type of International offers you receive.
  • Rumours about interested nations will circulate in the press for some months before you actually receive a firm offer.
  • Squad selection will be a key part of your International management duties and deadlines for selections (one week prior to friendlies, one month prior to tournaments) have to be met.
  • International competitions will run in parallel with the club game meaning you could land a job in the middle of a qualifying campaign.
  • International management has it’s own Career Mode “Hub” keeping your club and country separate.

In Match Live Score Updates

  • Whilst playing your Career Mode matches you’ll now receive audio updates from other games being played in your league voiced by Alan Mcinally and Geoff Shreeves.
  • The live updates cover goal, red card and penalty incidents.
  • Example – Shreeves: “Goal at Anfield, Fulham’s Clint Dempsey scores a brilliant freekick to make it 2-1, 73 minutes played” Tyler “Thanks Geoff”
  • You can select/de-select the matches you want to hear audio updates from prior to playing starting your match.

Player Stories

  • Interaction with players is now more regular with instant feedback received based on managerial decisions.
  • Player Stories can now run for months in to Career Mode re-emerging if you go through a bad run of results or when you sell/buy a key player.
  • Specific Player Stories also occur when managing an International team, meaning you’ll need to keep both club and country happy.
  • Fan stories will now make top news in the press based on team performance.

Be A Player

  • Once you’ve chosen your player (VP or real) you receive a set of Season Objectives to complete from the manager. The type of player you choose (forward, midfielder, defender, etc) will shape these objectives.
  • As well as Season Objectives you’ll also be asked to achieve objectives every four matches. This could include, goals, clean sheets, pass/tackle completion percentages, etc. The quality of opposition over these four games will decide the values you are asked to achieve.
  • If you are unhappy you now have the option to request a transfer, or request a loan to gain more match experience.
  • If you choose to play for a top club with a low rated VP you will not be a first team starter to begin with, you’ll be loaned to gain experience first.
  • If fatigued or playing poorly the manager can now substitute your player.
  • Once your playing days are over can can opt to retire and take up management.

Classified Results

  • After each Career Mode match you now receive a rundown of the classified results through in-game audio (think BBC Final Score)
  • League table updates are also fed back to you as well as any upcoming fixtures. These audio sequences happen less regularly than the classified results.
  • When this audio is running you can still browse all Career Mode menus and continue to the next game week.

Managers Office

  • You can now view any available managerial positions via the Jobs Board, this allows you to change clubs mid season should you wish to.
  • Your manager now appears on the touchline in matches based on customisation options chosen at the start of Career Mode.

Transfer Negotiations

  • The transfer system has been completely re-written for Career Mode in FIFA 13.
  • You can now offer player plus cash and player trade deals to the CPU.
  • When offering to loan players you can now set a future purchase price to sign the player permanently at the end of the loan period.
  • When the CPU makes an offer for one of your players you can now choose to “Counter Offer” to ask for more money. The CPU will then choose to accept, reject or make a counter offer of their own.
  • Contract negotiations now contain advice from your Chief Executive which act as a guide to what they think the club and player may want.
  • When offering contracts you can now choose a role for the player you’re trying to sign eg Crucial Player, Important Player, Future Star. This expectation will effect whether a player chooses to join your club.
  • Prior to making a firm offer you can now make an Enquiry to find out whether a player is available and how much the club want for them.
  • You can now make offers for players directly from media stories by pressing the left stick.
  • A new Financial Strictness setting will limit the percentage of players sales that go back in to your transfer budget (chosen at the start of CM).

Breaking News

  • A new “Sky Sports” style overlay will now deliver breaking and top news to the Career Mode hub.

Edit Players

  • You now have the ability to edit player appearance during your Career Mode seasons. This option can be unlocked via the new EASFC Catalogue.

User Interface

  • You can now read news articles from the media pane whilst the game is advancing.
  • The first time you enter Career Mode menus a tutorial overlay appears to guide you through each panes function.

Right at the death last night we were asked to withhold one more big piece of Career Mode news which we’ll try to bring you as soon as we can (sorry) but it does mean you have more to look forward to. Tom’s full Career Mode Impressions article will follow shortly (with screens) but for now hit the comments to let us know your thoughts on the new features. Pleased?

Links

http://www.thesixtha...en-with-balls/#

http://www.guardian....fifa-13-preview

http://www.eurogamer...ferees-a-w-nker

http://www.eurogamer...-voice-commands

http://www.eurogamer...nuses-announced

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And yet another "what would you do in a 10 month dev cycle?" debate starts.

For me:

After playing Siread's NSS, having truly skillful mini games should be a major addition.

The first touch stuff sounds hit and miss, one to be tried.

The Kinect feature initially sounded cool but it now appears it remains as a constant "aggression bar" in the background, so long as that bar falls off over time, I think that should be fine.

I still want a multiplayer training arena though.

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New features don't matter a jot to me. In fact, the less time they spend on new features, the more time they have to tweak the game itself to get it as good as they can. I spend hundreds and hundreds of hours each year playing FIFA, and after 3 weeks all I'll play is matchmaking and BAP 10v10.

The only two changes that have really mattered are the 360 degree dribbling and the new defending system, the second of which has grown on me (after initially hating it) to the point that I can barely imagine how we even played with 'legacy' defending in previous years.

If all they did was take out the 'control of doom' (over the top throuhgball, your defender chests or controls it straight to an attacker) and the fact you can give away penalties through no fault of your own, I'd still buy it.

FIFA 12 is my favourite FIFA yet, I think. 09 will always be the game that got me addicted to football games again, but I've loved getting slowly better at this version and feeling rewarded for my efforts. It takes a hell of a lot of work to get good at FIFA these days, and I like that. We could do without the overly specific AI settings in the menu though. That just stinks of lazy balancing. Personally though I never feel the need to play against the AI and always wonder why anyone with a half decent connection would even bother.

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I think the head to head seasons of FIFA12 was possibly the best addition in recent years. Being able to play against random opponents with a lesser team level was very welcome after years of Southampton vs Barcelona.

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Pro Evo is going to destroy FIFA this year. I thought it did last year actually but I know that's just IMO. I think more people will prefer PES this year. The demo is really good. I think I'm just a bit sick of EA and all the marketing to be honest and that could well be affecting my judgement but whatever.

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Pro Evo is going to destroy FIFA this year. I thought it did last year actually but I know that's just IMO. I think more people will prefer PES this year. The demo is really good. I think I'm just a bit sick of EA and all the marketing to be honest and that could well be affecting my judgement but whatever.

Do they have 10v10 yet?

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Do they have 10v10 yet?

If the core game is better why should this matter. For example a 10x10 version of spectrum match day - better than the new PES?

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All those "innovations" and no word about actual AI improvements, especially on team style and ability that can actually distinguish poor teams from good teams.

No random weather that can make a difference, no word about a much needed revamped stamina system, no word about less pressing from the AI and actual build up play.

Unless you play online, it seems PES will again be the choice this year. If Konami manages to improve online though, then this might be the year FIFA receives a kick in the nuts. That's the only way they'll start spending their resources on actual improvements.

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Yeah online in FIFA has been pretty damn good for years and it's only going to get better.

Single player is never going really improve until it starts incorporating local co-op (see FIFA Euro 2008/WC2010) and online. This isn't Skyrim, I just don't think "single-player" even exists anymore. Even single player awards are ranked on a social leaderboard against friends. Player v AI is not the future of football games, but a merger with online will be.

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If the core game is better why should this matter. For example a 10x10 version of spectrum match day - better than the new PES?

Because it's a headline feature of FIFA that PES has not been able to match in previous versions.

If they could do so then it would be down to the core game, but as it stands then not having 10v10 will at best make going with PES an addition to, rather than a replacement of FIFA for some people.

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Because it's a headline feature of FIFA that PES has not been able to match in previous versions.

If they could do so then it would be down to the core game, but as it stands then not having 10v10 will at best make going with PES an addition to, rather than a replacement of FIFA for some people.

Some people, you said it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Do they have 10v10 yet?

That's a fair point, I don't play online enough for this to matter. I think if you like online then FIFA is the way to go but PES has much better career options and single player stuff and much better CPU opponent AI (in 12 at least).

I fully realise I'm in the minority here but whilst I like the odd one on one game online, I can't be arsed most of the time.

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I had a lengthy go on the PES demo the other night. It's improved in places, mostly aping FIFA - but the actual game is still miles behind FIFA. It feels odd going back to a defence with auto-defend again, makes you realise how much the defensive changes in FIFA12 transformed the game. It also seems to still have 8-way controls which is just unforgivable. The only positive I could find for PES is your attacking players desire to get make forward runs, something FIFA12 isn't brilliant at.

The FIFA series has been outstanding since 08 for me. One of the finest games of this generation certainly, even if it's never considered in that capacity.

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FIFA 13; the tackle now homes in apparently

This means no more pressing the tackle button and being ludicrously out of position.

I'm really confused. Everyone said it was great before and more realistic. This was the future.

Why have they automated it, if it was so great?

Oh hang on it was rubbish, yet people lapped it up with a "FIFA can't do wrong!" mantra. Doh!

Right again lads ;)

(might actually but it this year then!)

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Bit harsh. I thought the tackle was a real mistake, a mis step, and it put me off the game.

Many said it was more realistic and this better.

The counter argument is that realism doesn't always make a better game.

It seems that the FIFA team have finally realised this too. And you guys will all agree with them, as that's what you'll do - so effectively I called it a year ago.

I'm just surprised as developers they'd have done that to the game. It was really short sighted. Yet because they've got such a loyal/fanatical fanbase I guess they thought they could do it and people wouldn't really care.

No doubt you'll see all the magazines/"professional" reviews also now backtrack and say its better also. They'll call it a "refinement".

It's just frustrating for me that such a fundamental change was hailed as the way forward and now when it's changed to be more automated it's better?

Pretty ridiculous.

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I

The FIFA series has been outstanding since 08 for me. One of the finest games of this generation certainly, even if it's never considered in that capacity.

Seriously?

I admit Fifa is easily my most played game of this generation but that is purely down to the fact its a good laugh on line in BAP mode and is quite possibly the best on line experience you can get on a console. I would be surprised if I had even spent more than 5 hours in single player as playing against the A.I is about as dull as train spotting.

NBA 2k,NHL, MLB The Show and heck even Madden are all better games than Fifa and can be enjoyed both on line and against the A.I

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