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Line of Duty (BBC)


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  • 2 weeks later...

(I wonder if we should have this thread be labelled "UK Crime Dramas" or similar)

 

Just finished series 1 of Happy Valley as was on Netflix. Amaze! Gets really sinister really quickly and just keeps going, despite the lovely British countryside. Nice surprise and use of juxtaposition yet still very real feeling. Sarah Lancashire's performance elevated the show to even greater heights. Need series 2 stat!

 

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I liked the domestic guff as you put it, as it got me more invested in the characters' motivations.

Didnt find it better or worse than line of duty's more procedure-dedicated approach - it's just a difference of positioning in that genre imo

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11 hours ago, Triple A said:

I liked the domestic guff as you put it, as it got me more invested in the characters' motivations.

Didnt find it better or worse than line of duty's more procedure-dedicated approach - it's just a difference of positioning in that genre imo

 

I can recommend listening to Adam Buxton's podcast chat with Sally Wainwright (author of Happy Valley).

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I've just worked my way through all four series of this over the last couple of weeks, with series three and four binged over the bank holiday weekend.

 

Love it :)

 

One thing I'm not sure on, though:

 

Dot came to AC-12 from AC-9, and it was AC-9 that Jamie went to after he transferred from AC-12.

 

So... Just how many Anti-Corruption Units does Line of Duty's Birmingham have?! Does it really need more than AC-12?

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Line of Duty's city is never named, but I thought it was Birmingham, not Manchester. Its force is the Central Police, its neighbouring force is East Mids, it was (at least in series one) shot in Birmingham...

 

It has - at a minimum - AC-12 and AC-9.

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The force itself is called Central Police, it's not just the central district of a larger force.

 

I've just checked Wikipedia regarding the location:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_of_Duty

 

Quote

 

Locations

 

Series one was filmed in Birmingham (including pub interiors in the Queens Arms)[14] and series two, three and four in Belfast by BBC Northern Ireland, per the end credits, though the city is not identified in the script in any series – set dressings and props indicate that the unnamed city is Birmingham (maps of Birmingham appear on walls, and telephone numbers use an 0121 area code). A photo gallery of exterior scenes from series two shows the 4th Street Station on Ormeau Avenue in Belfast.[15]

 

 

 

As for my actual question, I found this on the Line of Duty fan Wikia:

 

http://lineofduty.wikia.com/wiki/AC-12
 

Quote

 

Anti Corruption Unit 12, often shortened to AC-12 is the professional standards department of Central Police. Led by Superintendent Ted Hastings, its job is to investigate members of the service who are expected of being involved in corruption, misconduct or mishandling case evidence.

 

 

 

http://lineofduty.wikia.com/wiki/AC-9
 

Quote

 

AC-9 is a smaller professional standards department within Central Police. Unlike their larger brother AC-12, they are also responsible for witness protection.

 

 

That does seem to fit. When Dot was transferred from AC-9 to AC-12, he was specifically referred to as a witness protection expert (plus it would make sense he was involved in WP, to keep an eye on Tommy). It would also tie in with Jamie - now in AC-9 - saying he had been ordered take one of the two witnesses into protective custody.

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  • 1 month later...

My wife and I watched series one a couple of months or so back on Netflix and found it fairly decent, but didn't feel compelled to rush into season two, until @elmo's post above reminded me about it and so we started season two on Saturday evening and wow!  Things moved at a much faster pace, Martin Compston seemed much less wooden, and we went to bed about 1.30am after watching the entire six episodes in one sitting, and ended up buying season three and four on Amazon Prime.

 

Series three was similarly awesome, and we moved onto series four last night, having reached the end of episode three where 

Spoiler

Steve Arnott has just been attacked.

 

I'd read that series four is probably the best series so far, however we're struggling a little with it so far.  Unless things become clearer later on, we just can't understand the motives of 

Spoiler

Roz Huntley, and why she didn't own up and tell the truth, claiming self-defence because Ifield was about to go all-out Dexter on her.  Especially after saying to the prostitute / cleaner that no court would convict her if she admitted to killing Ifield in self-defence.

 

And neither of us are feeling it as a result.  Still, three episodes to go so plenty of time for some twists and turns to convince us otherwise.  No doubt we'll still finish it this evening and then join the rest of you in the painful wait for series five which the last I read won't be until 2019!

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The remaining episodes ramp things up until the almost breathless finale. About the most animated either my gf and I have got during any TV show in recent memory, so much wow, made all the more impactful by the relatively slow-burn build up.

 

So good.

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57 minutes ago, Triple A said:

Are series' 3 and 4 available anywhere? Netflix only has S1 and 2. Hankering for my next fix on this

 

I paid £5.99 for series three and £13.99 for season four to own digitally from Amazon Prime.  I think they’re a quid cheaper each in SD.

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4 hours ago, glb said:

The remaining episodes ramp things up until the almost breathless finale. About the most animated either my gf and I have got during any TV show in recent memory, so much wow, made all the more impactful by the relatively slow-burn build up.

 

So good.

 

It did indeed ramp things up and mostly cleared up our issues with Huntley’s motivations too in the end. I still think the series three finale was better, but this was very close. Quite a tidy ending, but still enough left open to make the thought of series five very interesting.

 

I just hope that they don’t 

Spoiler

make Hastings the true ‘H’ though. He should remain a thoroughly honest police officer.

 

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10 hours ago, Stejay said:

 

It did indeed ramp things up and mostly cleared up our issues with Huntley’s motivations too in the end. I still think the series three finale was better, but this was very close. Quite a tidy ending, but still enough left open to make the thought of series five very interesting.

 

I just hope that they don’t 

  Reveal hidden contents

make Hastings the true ‘H’ though. He should remain a thoroughly honest police officer.

 

 

Aye, hope the same re the spoiler. Think it's a red-herring to bridge between seasons, and plant doubt and would take some deft writing to pull off. Then again, maybe the real 'H' being so duplicitous would make such a reveal work.

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On 16/05/2017 at 11:49, carleton said:

I think the UK has had some excellent cop stuff these past few years. I certainly prefer it to the American equivalents. Luther, LoD, Happy Valley, No Offence and The Fall spring to mind straight away. All really good concise series.

 

My wife and I have just watched series one of Happy Valley over the last two days due to the mentions of it in this thread.  Cracking series that I'd heard of, but would probably never had watched otherwise.  It is better acted and more grounded in reality than Line of Duty, although it slower and not quite as 'quick, stick the next one on!' compelling as that is. The title credits with the wobbly fonts weirdly reminded me of Justified for some reason.

 

We've been almost exclusively watching US TV shows for years, other than Luther at the time, and LoD and HV over the last couple of weeks.  I've been stupidly ignorant and missed out on some quality programmes as a result.  We've noticed The Night Manager is on Amazon Prime, so that's next up in our UK TV catch-up.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

I hadn't heard of this programme at all but decided to watch season 4 it after it came second (following Handmaid's Tale) in the Guardian's top TV of 2017 list. I can't remember the last time I watched a British TV drama, as inferior as it tends to be compared with American TV, so I was a bit dubious to begin with, but - as others have said - it's fantastic. So tense! The interview scenes, especially, were completely breathless, and the whole thing had the wife and me guessing right up until the end. We watched the whole series over six nights and spend 20 minutes after each episode discussing it.

 

Top stuff. We're going to watch the series now. I think they're all on iPlayer. Are they as good?

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I don't think British dramas are inferior at all. Especially not crime dramas. Line Of Duty is good although it has become increasingly far fetched as its gone along. We have a fine lineage of quality crime dramas_ Prime Suspect, Cracker, Trial And Retribution, Waking The Dead, The Vice , Broadchurch etc.  Far superior to most US offerings.  A Touch Of Frost and Morse also top quality shows!!

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