Jump to content

Xbox One Console Thread


Recommended Posts

I don't know if this has been posted earlier in the thread so apologise if that's the case.

Found a video on youtube showing the new kinect in action, tell me this doesn't scare/worry you just a bit.

I personally wouldn't have it anywhere near me, i was impressed by the tech though.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It doesn't scare or worry me one bit.

Whether or not it gets used for anything interesting is my only concern.

It looks pretty impressive. If it's that sensitive and accurate then it does open up much more realistic motion games.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That pretty much nails it. You only have to look at the difference in people running the whole Xbox program from 360 era to now, to see how and why things have changed. Aside from Don Mattrick, I didn't recognise anyone from the Xbox unveil, but from what I've subsequently read, all of them come from a strictly business background, with no links to gaming.

this has been the case since Bill Gates left. No true "rebels" in senior management, all of them with their MBAs focusing on business. They are disconnected from the products they represent and their underlings make, I imagine every time a new product or service is finished and they have to sell it to the press they're just running it by the numbers, feeling no genuine passion or connection with the product they didn't make.

Same with Steve Jobs in a way. Since his death Apple have been shit and boring, whereas MS have just lost it.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you reckon the average parent will even realise. I mean, we're all interested in this stuff so we know what the deal is, but would a parent who isn't interested in games ?

They will the first time they take games back to GAME to trade them in

Link to post
Share on other sites

this has been the case since Bill Gates left. No true "rebels" in senior management, all of them with their MBAs focusing on business. They are disconnected from the products they represent and their underlings make, I imagine every time a new product or service is finished and they have to sell it to the press they're just running it by the numbers, feeling no genuine passion or connection with the product they didn't make.

Same with Steve Jobs in a way. Since his death Apple have been shit and boring, whereas MS have just lost it.

This article is pretty interesting- extracts take from GAF

http://www.vanityfair.com/business/2012/08/microsoft-lost-mojo-steve-ballmer

Quote:
In those years Microsoft had stepped up its efforts to cripple competitors, but—because of a series of astonishingly foolish management decisions—the competitors being crippled were often co-workers at Microsoft, instead of other companies. Staffers were rewarded not just for doing well but for making sure that their colleagues failed. As a result, the company was consumed by an endless series of internal knife fights. Potential market-busting businesses—such as e-book and smartphone technology—were killed, derailed, or delayed amid bickering and power plays.

That is the portrait of Microsoft depicted in interviews with dozens of current and former executives, as well as in thousands of pages of internal documents and legal records.

“They used to point their finger at IBM and laugh,” said Bill Hill, a former Microsoft manager. “Now they’ve become the thing they despised.”

Today, Microsoft stands at a precipice, an all-or-nothing opportunity that may be Ballmer’s last chance to demonstrate to Wall Street that he is the right man with the right plan to lead the sprawling enterprise into the future. With Surface, the recently unveiled tablet, Windows 8, Windows Phone 7, Windows Server 2012, and Xbox 720 in the offing, he could be on the verge of proving his strategies—including last year’s controversial, $8.5 billion acquisition of Skype. But whether these succeed or not, executives say, the Microsoft of old, the nimble player that captured the passions of a generation of techies and software engineers, is dead and gone.

“I see Microsoft as technology’s answer to Sears,” said Kurt Massey, a former senior marketing manager. “In the 40s, 50s, and 60s, Sears had it nailed. It was top-notch, but now it’s just a barren wasteland. And that’s Microsoft. The company just isn’t cool anymore.”

Quote:
Sometimes, though, the problems from bureaucracy came down to a simple reality: The young hotshots from the 1980s, techies who had joined the company in their 20s and 30s, had become middle-aged managers in their 40s and 50s. And, some younger engineers said, a good number of the bosses just didn’t understand the burgeoning class of computer users who had been children—or hadn’t even been born—when Microsoft opened its doors. When younger employees tried to point out emerging trends among their friends, supervisors sometimes just waved them away.

“Most senior people were out of touch with the ways the home users were starting to use computers, especially the younger generation,” one software developer said.

An example—in 1997, AOL introduced its instant-messenger program, called AIM, a precursor to the texting functions on cell phones. Two years later, Microsoft followed with a similar program, called MSN Messenger.

In 2003, a young developer noticed that friends in college signed up for AIM exclusively and left it running most of the time. The reason? They wanted to use the program’s status message, which allowed them to type a short note telling their online buddies what they were doing, even when they weren’t at the computer. Messages like “gone shopping” and “studying for my exams” became commonplace.

“That was the beginning of the trend toward Facebook, people having somewhere to put their thoughts, a continuous stream of consciousness,” said the developer, who worked in the MSN Messenger unit. “The main purpose of AIM wasn’t to chat, but to give you the chance to log in at any time and check out what your friends were doing.”

The developer concluded that no young person would switch from AIM to MSN Messenger, which did not have the short-message feature. He spoke about the problem to his boss, a middle-aged man. The supervisor dismissed the developer’s concerns as silly. Why would young people care about putting up a few words? Anyone who wanted to tell friends what they were doing could write it on their profile page, he said. Meaning users would have to open the profile pages, one friend at a time, and search for a status message, if it was there at all.

“He didn’t get it,” the developer said. “And because he didn’t know or didn’t believe how young people were using messenger programs, we didn’t do anything.”

Quote:
When Apple introduced the iPhone, Steve Ballmer laughed. “No chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share,” he said in 2007, adding that same year, “iPod is a hot brand—not Apple.”

He pooh-poohed the iPad when it came out, in 2010, and it has been busting down the barn doors ever since, selling more than 55 million units. As for Google, Ballmer’s predictions were equally off base—according to court records, in 2005 he proclaimed, “Google’s not a real company. It’s a house of cards.”

Plenty of people can make predictions that prove boneheaded. But Ballmer’s bad calls have been particularly damaging for him inside Microsoft. Until his dying days, Steve Jobs could not only predict the direction the marketplace would be heading, but help drive it there. Google continues to pop out feature after feature and is now shooting directly at Microsoft’s main business lines: Google Docs is a free Web program competing with Microsoft Office. Google Chrome OS is a free operating system targeted at Windows.

With the competitors showing that kind of success—and winning so many accolades—Ballmer’s confidently proclaimed errors have been hugely embarrassing for Microsoft’s technical specialists, fueling muttered complaints that their C.E.O., a man with little technological background, was undermining them within the techie community.

“Steve has a knack for putting his foot in his mouth and being made to look incredibly foolish, and that just always grated on people at Microsoft,” said a former program manager who left the company last year to work at Google. “When he makes these predictions that are so horribly wrong, and you know it at the time, it is hard to forgive that, because it means he is hopelessly out of touch with reality or not listening to the tech staff around him.”

Ballmer’s key business philosophy for Microsoft was so antiquated as to be irrelevant. The Microsoft C.E.O. used to proclaim that it would not be first to be cool, but would be first to profit—in other words, it would be the first to make money by selling its own version of new technologies. But that depended on one fact: Microsoft could buy its way into the lead, because it always had so much more cash on hand than any of its competitors.

No more. The advantage that Ballmer relied on for so long is now nonexistent. Google has almost the same amount of cash on its books as Microsoft—$50 billion to Microsoft’s $58 billion. Apple, on the other hand, started the year with about $100 billion. Using superior financial muscle to take over a market won’t work for Microsoft or Ballmer anymore.

  • Upvote 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you reckon the average parent will even realise. I mean, we're all interested in this stuff so we know what the deal is, but would a parent who isn't interested in games ?

Maybe not at first but all it takes is MS or their internet to hiccup, their kid asking to trade a game for a new one or indeed a family ending up with two of the things and a kid wanting to borrow their sister's game for it all to become really quite clear.

EDIT : And actually, bear in mind "YOU MUST UNPLUG ELECTRONICS WHEN NOT ACTIVELY IN USE OR THE WORLD EXPLODES" is a thing people really believe, so it won't even require a 24hr internet outage for people to start noticing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One question I do have is do people really constantly unplug their 360 from the Internet? Mine's been connected to Live since the day I got it and I've never felt the need to unplug it. Why would anyone need to keep disconnecting and reconnecting their cable?

Link to post
Share on other sites

One question I do have is do people really constantly unplug their 360 from the Internet? Mine's been connected to Live since the day I got it and I've never felt the need to unplug it. Why would anyone need to keep disconnecting and reconnecting their cable?

Like I just said, some people unplug electronics when not in use.

But yes, some people certainly do, in my childhood my parents wouldn't allow network cables in the house unless they were actively being used so I'd have to unplug my PC from the internet whenever I wasn't at it. This is a problem wireless partially solves of course.

But no, your 360 hasn't been connected to Live since you got it because Live isn't up 24/7.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing that playing on PC the last few years and having to deal with the various DRM schemes publishers have tried to make us accept has taught me is that it isn't your broadband connection you need to worry about, it's theirs.

  • Upvote 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

If whatever they show tomorrow doesn't turn people around, and the way things stand at the moment it's looking highly unlikely, then it will be interesting to see what sort of incentives they end up offering to keep existing LIVE users paying for and upgrading to the One.

I am genuinely intrigued to see if tomorrow they can deliver on this idea of unique new games and features only available as a result of the xbox infrastructure. Unless they were actually meaning the whole DRM shitstorm and laughing at how much money they were going to make whilst selling this snake oil.

Still sitting in the "they must have something major to show off which gamers will ultimately end up dropping their morals for." I cannot believe that tomorrow's reveals are just going to be a slight extension of what we currently have. I'm hoping some developers and Turn 10 seem to the one MS are using, show us something quite extraordinary that genuinely moves things forward and is seen as a positive direction for gamers and gaming.

I think thats peoples main beef, they have given us always online and fucked us over right left and centre and the only plus i can seem to get out of it all is i dont need the disc in to play a game. We need more in exchange, i can do the updating while away right now on my ps3, ms is taking alot away and giving us nothing in return. We need to see these games that use the cloud in a way we can say ohh yeah im willing to hand over this other stuff and get this other stuff in return. Ms fucked this all up, this is a console reveal on a level of fuck up we aint ever seen before. It buts ps3 and wii u into non league while ms is in the champions league of fuck ups.

Link to post
Share on other sites

After the PSN outtage a few years ago I am amazed that any company would willingly put what is an internet-based kill switch in their product. Even assuming Microsoft have accounted for risks of accidental outtages, surely a malicious DDOA attack or successful hacking of its servers would effectively stop all Xbones from working worldwide. Even worse than the PSN outtage which "only" screwed up online features and transactions, the console would be a complete brick until MS could get the system up and running again.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely the developers who are on board aren't all faceless money men and still have a desire to create new games with new possibilities ?

I'm sure they aren't all faceless money lovers, and that most of them do want to create games with new possibilities.

The question is how many of those developers are shackled by what their faceless money-loving overlords tell them to make?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm loving all the negs I'm picking up in this thread. Sorry for asking sensible questions.

I suppose if Live goes down for more than 24 hours that can't be seen as acceptable if you can't play your games. Surely they must have thought of this and have a fail safe. Surely.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose if Live goes down for more than 24 hours that can't be seen as acceptable if you can't play your games. Surely they must have thought of this and have a fail safe. Surely.

Prepared to bet the cost of a new console and a couple of games -- let's say £425 -- on that?
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm loving all the negs I'm picking up in this thread. Sorry for asking sensible questions.

I suppose if Live goes down for more than 24 hours that can't be seen as acceptable if you can't play your games. Surely they must have thought of this and have a fail safe. Surely.

If they had a failsafe available which kept the DRM intact, then surely they would use that rather than forcing a 24 hour online check-in?

Link to post
Share on other sites

One question I do have is do people really constantly unplug their 360 from the Internet? Mine's been connected to Live since the day I got it and I've never felt the need to unplug it. Why would anyone need to keep disconnecting and reconnecting their cable?

I don't disconnect my 360, no. But I quite regularly get kicked out of Live for no reason, even though my internet access is just fine for every other device in the house.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm loving all the negs I'm picking up in this thread. Sorry for asking sensible questions.

I suppose if Live goes down for more than 24 hours that can't be seen as acceptable if you can't play your games. Surely they must have thought of this and have a fail safe. Surely.

See for me, it's this simple. I don't get why my offline games need to be authenticated every twenty four hours. I don't want my single player, offline games to require that. I can see no benefit to this. As yet, you have not provided one positive reason either, so if you can think of one, let us know.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if this has been posted earlier in the thread so apologise if that's the case.

Found a video on youtube showing the new kinect in action, tell me this doesn't scare/worry you just a bit.

I personally wouldn't have it anywhere near me, i was impressed by the tech though.

Look at the lag though.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Elastic cloud scaling, man. Solves all those problems. Sim City was on EC2.

You weren't around for the Sim City launch, obviously.

At the time, I said they simply couldn't be using elastic computing, because otherwise they'd would not have had problems on the scale that they did if they could just spin up some new servers. When I found out they were using EC2 I was like whaaaaaaaaaaat.

Edit: unless, this was a beard?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been an offline gamer for about seven months now. My 360 is not connected to the internet (no wireless, no lead plugged in). I like, and want it this way. If I get an Xbone, I am fucked. I do not have a smart phone nor do I want one. I don't want to have to have a console plugged in at least once a day. Currently, if I go to my mate's place who has no internet, I can take my 360 round and marvel of all marvels, we can play games on the 360! Woo hoo! If I grab an Xbone, we can't (before I get asked if he has a smart phone the answer is no. Fuck smart phones).

Add in paying extra for twatty Kinect and stuff, well screw this. I'm all for making it a media all in one YOU DON'T NEED ANYTHING ELSE IN LIFE BUT THIS box, but at least let me play the games I purchase on a console I purchased without pushing some shitty authentication rule on me.

  • Upvote 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing that playing on PC the last few years and having to deal with the various DRM schemes publishers have tried to make us accept has taught me is that it isn't your broadband connection you need to worry about, it's theirs.

Yeah and despite the Sim City fiasco etc, that's still the bit that seems hardest to get across to people who don't post in places like this.

After the PSN outtage a few years ago I am amazed that any company would willingly put what is an internet-based kill switch in their product. Even assuming Microsoft have accounted for risks of accidental outtages, surely a malicious DDOA attack or successful hacking of its servers would effectively stop all Xbones from working worldwide. Even worse than the PSN outtage which "only" screwed up online features and transactions, the console would be a complete brick until MS could get the system up and running again.

And you can bet that if they launch with this some chucklefuck will use the anonymous brand to have a go.

I'm loving all the negs I'm picking up in this thread. Sorry for asking sensible questions.

I suppose if Live goes down for more than 24 hours that can't be seen as acceptable if you can't play your games. Surely they must have thought of this and have a fail safe. Surely.

Problem is, any fictional fail safe they might provide is also the vector that will be used to hack it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.