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The Smoking and BBQ thread


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7 hours ago, The Hierophant said:

Looks good. Instructions?

 

Pretty easy, uncooked unsmoked ham with rind cut off but fat left on and scored.

 

BBQ setup for indirect and 225-275f with plenty of apple wood chips for smoke - this one was about 1.6kg and cooked for about 4 hours until 160 internal temp.

 

Maple syrup brushed on at the start and every now and again while cooking - really simple and super tasty!

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22 minutes ago, The Hierophant said:

That is simple. No boiling at all first. 

 

Nope 100% cooked on the BBQ as nature intended ;)

 

Only thing I forgot to mention is I did soak it in milk overnight to draw out the salt, essential on a supermarket ham but maybe not needed if cured yourself / decent butcher!

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9 minutes ago, Jonny5 said:

Never heard of using milk for that.  Is it better than using water then?

 

A few recipes have suggested so, boiling obv works with water but we don't want to cook it that way so I guess milk works better than cold water?

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Seems an odd claim. Happy to be proven wrong, but the salt is mainly going to be removed by osmosis. Milk has sugars and fats in that water does not. My point is vanishing while I make this post but it still seems an odd claim.

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21 hours ago, Shimmyhill said:

 

Nope 100% cooked on the BBQ as nature intended ;)

 

Only thing I forgot to mention is I did soak it in milk overnight to draw out the salt, essential on a supermarket ham but maybe not needed if cured yourself / decent butcher!

 

It was the salt I was mainly thinking about.

 

I've not tried the soaking in milk. I'm tempted. But boiling leaves behind a fantastic cooking liquor that is great for soup.   

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6 hours ago, The Hierophant said:

 

It was the salt I was mainly thinking about.

 

I've not tried the soaking in milk. I'm tempted. But boiling leaves behind a fantastic cooking liquor that is great for soup.   

 

There is that but I'm not sure I will ever boil a ham again, same with sweet corn - we always boiled those and I never knew why they had sweet in the name until I grilled some on the BBQ - so much flavour lost in the water and I wonder if its the same with a ham?

 

No idea if milk is better than water for getting the salt out, just have read it in loads of BBQ recipes so did it!

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sweetcorn is gorgeous - its delicious over the grill, but our favourite method is to butter it uncooked, then wrap tightly in foil, I then cook just off the direct heat and after about 20m or so the butter soaks into the corn and it all caramelises in the foil - its utterly delicious.

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20 hours ago, Jonny5 said:

I've also done that with similar amazing results. 

 

We're doing roast chicken for 6 adults & 3 kids tomorrow so gonna roast two chickens on the Traeger to leave room for lots of spuds in the main oven. 

 

How did you get one, I didnt think the Traeger got hot enough for a roast chicken - interested to know how it worked out/method etc?

 

 

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Right, have a minute to update. It was so simple, stuck the probes into the chicken thighs  shut the lid and wandered off to do everything else. 

 

The chicken was super moist and fell away from the bones. It didn't really have any smokey taste, but was just really nice roast chicken. 

 

I find that when you do BBQ well it can be hard to tell the difference between BBQ and conventional oven cooking. I did some sausages indirect on the Weber the other day and they came out just like the oven. 

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1 hour ago, Jonny5 said:

Right, have a minute to update. It was so simple, stuck the probes into the chicken thighs  shut the lid and wandered off to do everything else. 

 

The chicken was super moist and fell away from the bones. It didn't really have any smokey taste, but was just really nice roast chicken. 

 

I find that when you do BBQ well it can be hard to tell the difference between BBQ and conventional oven cooking. I did some sausages indirect on the Weber the other day and they came out just like the oven. 

 

Presumably the skin stops the smoke, think I would prefer it not too smokey - they look great!

 

I find when you BBQ most things they come out better than the oven tbh, even when not adding smoke things just seem to be moister - with your grill do the probes plug into the unit itself or do you have a separate device to monitor them?

 

Not that I've been looking at Traeger smokers again, ohh nooooo not me..

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The probes plug into the smoker. The display shows the current temp and then you hit a button to view the probe temps.  It's nice having it all built in. 

 

The one slight annoyance is that the temps are all in C on the panel but all the recipes give them in F so I'm constantly converting between the two. 

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I'm relatively new to the world of barbecue, with my experience consisting of a few Spanish holidays where we've had a villa with one and I've grilled a few chicken fillets to within an inch of their life.

 

Anyways, I've bought a relatively cheap bowl shaped one with lid to get started (like the Weber kettle shape) and am planning to give it a go.

 

Any simple tips for a beginner would be appreciated. I'm not looking at smoking brisket for 16 hours, just cooking smaller things like chicken, burgers, steaks etc.

 

One main question I do have is what's the best charcoal & fluid to use that's readily available? Again, not looking to get too exotic, but is the usual high street stuff any good, and are there certain things to avoid?

 

Cheers for any help.

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Google 2 zone cooking & get a chimney starter - don't use lighter fluid!

 

Big K briquettes are ok (£5 a bag from Waitrose of all places) and if you're just doing normal BBQ stuff I don't think it really matters. I've used the cheap crap from B&Q without any negative outcomes. 

 

Most of all enjoy it! (And post pics) 

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24 minutes ago, Jonny5 said:

Google 2 zone cooking & get a chimney starter - don't use lighter fluid!

 

Big K brickettes are ok (£5 a bag from Waitrose of all places) and if you're just doing normal BBQ stuff I don't think it really matters. I've used the cheap crap from B&Q without any negative outcomes. 

 

Most of all enjoy it! (And post pics) 

 

Thanks for that, don't worry, I wasn't planning on using anything other than proper barbecue fluid/blocks/gel.

 

I'll start off with bog standard charcoal, probably something like this:

https://www.aldi.co.uk/bbq-days-charcoal-briquettes-5kg/p/069051125416300

or this:

http://www.diy.com/departments/jack-daniels-charcoal-briquettes-3kg-pack/213810_BQ.prd

 

and the fluid will be something like this (this is the type of stuff I've used before on holiday)

http://www.homebase.co.uk/en/homebaseuk/bbq-odourless-lighting-gel---500ml-236003

 

I've just had a look at 2 zone cooking, seems pretty sensible.

As for the chimney starter, I've just read the weber site and they seem like an amazing bit of kit. Do they really work as well as stated (ready for use in 20 mins)?

Link is https://www.weber.com/US/en/blog/how-to-use-a-chimney-starter

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I got mine for about £7 from Waitrose (for some reason our local one had loads of cheap BBQ stuff last summer). I stick a couple of lighter blocks on the floor and stand the chimney over the top. It's always worked although sometimes might take a little longer than 20 mins. 

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Never ever use fluid or easy light charcoal as it will taint the food.

 

As others have said get a chimney starter and lighting cubes, Weber are good but loads of natural lighters are fine - even newspaper soaked in cooking oil works! Basically getting a chimney starter is the most important thing you will do early on as it makes lighting and getting coals ready easy.

 

I used those Aldi briquettes and they are fine but designed for longer cooks - stick with charcoal (non easy light remember as its soaked in fuel) and I use Big K or restaurant grade delivered by coals2u - both are cheap and tend to be nice big lumps! I cooked a half leg of lamb on Big K charcoal yesterday and got 2 hours cooking from it!

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On 21/04/2017 at 18:54, Gotters said:

sweetcorn is gorgeous - its delicious over the grill, but our favourite method is to butter it uncooked, then wrap tightly in foil, I then cook just off the direct heat and after about 20m or so the butter soaks into the corn and it all caramelises in the foil - its utterly delicious.

 

This is exactly how I do it. A bit of salt in with the butter as well.  

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14 hours ago, cubik said:

and the fluid will be something like this (this is the type of stuff I've used before on holiday)

http://www.homebase.co.uk/en/homebaseuk/bbq-odourless-lighting-gel---500ml-236003

 

I've just had a look at 2 zone cooking, seems pretty sensible.

As for the chimney starter, I've just read the weber site and they seem like an amazing bit of kit. Do they really work as well as stated (ready for use in 20 mins)?

Link is https://www.weber.com/US/en/blog/how-to-use-a-chimney-starter

 

Yeah, that stuff at the top is lighter fluid. Not need at all if you're using a chimney starter.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/a1h/AMOS-Barbecue-Charcoal-Galvanised-Ignition-Lighting-Thermoplastic/B00YCQD0KA

 

I got the chimney starter above, it's pretty sizeable so it's perfect even if I want to do a BBQ packed full of ready lit stuff for all direct grilling. Two sheets of newspaper, drizzle on a little oil and roll into tubes, put one inside the other in the gap under the bottom of the coals and light. The coals above are usually ready for cooking in about 15 mins, and the only downside is the newspaper ash.

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I love those little wooden 'steel wall' balls you can get to light the charcoal, as they totally burn up leaving nothing behind - think the brand is called Flamers but you can get them in places like Home Depot or Poundstretcher for next to nothing - always buy loads when I see them

 

 

This kind of thing (this is first google result, don't know about the price or company)

http://www.philipmorrisdirect.co.uk/certainly-wood-firestarter-flamers/product/?utm_source=GoogleBase&utm_medium=organic&gclid=Cj0KEQjwxPbHBRCdxJLF3qen3dYBEiQAMRyxS9N8oXKHuQGqgB5gQf3jIIFNKNElv_ECEQoBC49JIxwaAj9H8P8HAQ

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