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The Smoking and BBQ thread


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there is something to be said for starting the fire up by hand, gauging the vent gap to hit the temp then just judging 'done' by eye, but seriously screw all that if you can get an amazing result in another way.

 

what I question with these electric pellet smokers is airflow, and how much there is. what makes a ceramic kamado so brilliant is the tiny need for air to keep the fire going, meaning there is less airflow and less drying out of the meat, I don't know how these pellet smokers work. I haven't read much about them so understand how they can maintain a temp and generate smoke, just don't know what effect that has on how much air is moving around in there.

 

its a huge factor, you can buy a supermarket chicken breast or pork chop and slap it on indirect in a kamado for the same time you'd put it in the oven and you won't believe the texture and moisture difference from doing it in a kitchen electric fan oven. 

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We are having quite a few people over for Christmas dinner and while we normally have a chicken (not a great turkey fan) we are thinking of going for chicken, beef and pork rather than trying to get a cow sized chicken - while we have a range style cooker with 2 proper ovens but I have been volunteered to do the pork and beef on the BBQ!

 

I see this as validation and an excuse to buy more toys ;) but on a serious note I haven't really ever done anything as 'normal' as this, I will have a practice run or three and assume I will just be going for a hot indirect cook but welcome any tips or suggestions on the cooking. 

 

@Gotters your post above caught my attention and this post, do you literally do it the same as in the oven or do you add anything?

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On 12/11/2016 at 19:06, Shimmyhill said:

 

@Gotters your post above caught my attention and this post, do you literally do it the same as in the oven or do you add anything?

 

unless its honking down I do all roast joints now out on the Primo bbq. 

 

for smaller cuts like chops and chicken breasts the temps and timings are very similar to the oven, if I have something like a chop I like to reverse sear where I give it some time indirect then add a bit of colour to finish it over the coals at the end (pork chops with a bit of crackling round the edge are very impressive !)

 

for larger joints it varies, I've found lamb and beef behave similar to the oven, but I would say that I give them a little extra time as the bbq seems a bit gentler on them and I get a far larger window where you can leave them in and they don't lose moisture (in fact beef can go a lot further in terms of core temp and be juicier than anything you get out an electric oven).

 

pork is a bit different if you want crackling, I get a high shelf over the coals and start it upside down to get the crackling going, depending on your joint if you've got something fattier you want to render (like shoulder) the cooking time is longer than an oven as its just not as drying and takes longer for the crackling to form. Patience is key though as the longer cooks results in the most spectacular pork we've ever eaten, shatter in your mouth crackling and juicy moist meat.

 

other than that I do nothing special, bit of salt and pepper bit no injections, rubs or anything like that (family preference is for high quality meat cooked simply !)

 

all this info is for a kamado, not sure the difference between it and a Weber kettle

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 11/6/2016 at 10:42, Gotters said:

there is something to be said for starting the fire up by hand, gauging the vent gap to hit the temp then just judging 'done' by eye, but seriously screw all that if you can get an amazing result in another way.

 

what I question with these electric pellet smokers is airflow, and how much there is. what makes a ceramic kamado so brilliant is the tiny need for air to keep the fire going, meaning their is less airflow and less drying out of the meat, I don't know how these pellet smokers work. I haven't read much about them so understand how they can maintain a temp and generate smoke, just don't know what effect that has on how much air is moving around in there.

 

its a huge factor, you can buy a supermarket chicken breast or pork chop and slap it on indirect in a kamado for the same time you'd put it in the oven and you won't believe the texture and moisture difference from doing it in a kitchen electric fan oven. 

I have a couple of buddies that have them over here and from what I recall they have electric fans in them to assist with airflow. That being said, neither one of them use it for "serious" smoking. Pizzas come out great but burgers come out looking distinctly under done despite internal temp saying otherwise.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 13/11/2016 at 10:16, Gotters said:

 

unless its honking down I do all roast joints now out on the Primo bbq. 

 

for smaller cuts like chops and chicken breasts the temps and timings are very similar to the oven, if I have something like a chop I like to reverse sear where I give it some time indirect then add a bit of colour to finish it over the coals at the end (pork chops with a bit of crackling round the edge are very impressive !)

 

for larger joints it varies, I've found lamb and beef behave similar to the oven, but I would say that I give them a little extra time as the bbq seems a bit gentler on them and I get a far larger window where you can leave them in and they don't lose moisture (in fact beef can go a lot further in terms of core temp and be juicier than anything you get out an electric oven).

 

pork is a bit different if you want crackling, I get a high shelf over the coals and start it upside down to get the crackling going, depending on your joint if you've got something fattier you want to render (like shoulder) the cooking time is longer than an oven as its just not as drying and takes longer for the crackling to form. Patience is key though as the longer cooks results in the most spectacular pork we've ever eaten, shatter in your mouth crackling and juicy moist meat.

 

other than that I do nothing special, bit of salt and pepper bit no injections, rubs or anything like that (family preference is for high quality meat cooked simply !)

 

all this info is for a kamado, not sure the difference between it and a Weber kettle

 

 

I had a test run with a bit of Pork, it wasn't a great cut but my got was it cooked well - amazing bracingly and so moist - the meat was a little tough but flavoursome, considering it was the cheapest bit I could find in Aldi I couldn't be more impressed!

 

File%2012-12-2016,%2018%2050%2028.jpeg

 

The only issue I did have was that the coals didnt hold 200c for the full couple of hours so I had to fire up the chimney again, I again used some cheaper briquettes from Aldi and it was bloody cold outside - will give it another try this week with some better briquettes but even the worst case is needing to light the chimney again.

 

God bless wireless thermometers tho, I swear its easier to cook on a BBQ than in an oven and results are always better!

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

So after getting a Weber back in the Autumn, I've had three low & slow cooks, and plan to have a lot more now it's getting lighter out.

 

First ever cook was a rib rack and a few individual spare ribs, smoked over Hickory.  Not bad, could have been a little more tender but I was a little rushed.

 

58ad5f316c803_2016-11-2014_54_58.jpg.13052565734ab5ad6cf66edc037d36ac.jpg58ad5f3263ba0_2016-11-2020_26_27.jpg.8442218ea1409b9623c88170c61ed41d.jpg58ad5f333932a_2016-11-2020_28_05.jpg.44cbeae441c53a4c8a409a0408de5c2f.jpg

 

 

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I'm doing ribs this weekend, think I've learnt a lot since my first three cooks through experience and lots of reading.

 

I've done lots of ribs in the oven up til now and they've always been delicious.  When I've done the above ribs and chicken on the bbq, I wasn't so keen on the taste this time round and I think that must be because of the rub used... It contains quite a lot of sugar, and made the meat taste a little sickly...  It must be my must taste since I'm not really keen on sweet cured bacon.

 

So this time round I'm just going to use a rub of salt, pepper, and garlic, and then glaze with the usual barbeque sauce.

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Looks good to me!  

 

I've got a big BBQ coming up in April for my birthday so trying to plan what & how to cook enough for about 20 adults & a load of kids.  I looked into getting caterers in so I could enjoy myself without worrying about the internal temps of various bits of meat all day but for the money I could get a fancy new BBQ and some awesome chunks of meat to put on it.

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Second attempt at ribs, much better than my first.  Took around 3.5 hours.  Used a rub of salt, pepper, and chipotle chilli flakes.  I also added a very light sprinkling of a general pre-mixed bbq rub.  Finished with French's Barbeque sauce.

 

Going to stay away from rubs that contain a lot of sugar from now on, I much prefer the sweetness to come from the sauce.

 

 

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On 22/02/2017 at 09:58, Jonny5 said:

Looks good to me!  

 

I've got a big BBQ coming up in April for my birthday so trying to plan what & how to cook enough for about 20 adults & a load of kids.  I looked into getting caterers in so I could enjoy myself without worrying about the internal temps of various bits of meat all day but for the money I could get a fancy new BBQ and some awesome chunks of meat to put on it.

 

So I canned the caterers idea and have just ordered a Slow n Sear.  My plan is to do brisket & pulled pork slowly and then once they're done & the party starts do some burgers, sausages & chicken to go with it.  Can't wait now, expect the day to be super stressful trying to get the brisket & pork cooked in time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Me again.  My amazing wife got me one of those Treagar Pellet Grills I've been lusting after for my 40th.  I unpacked it and set it all up this weekend but have yet to cook on it.  It's really solid and weighs a ton compared to anything else I've used.  It's super simple to work as well so looking forward to having a proper cook on it soon.

 

That leads me onto my big BBQ coming up.  I ordered some brisket & pork shoulder at the weekend, 5Kg of each, and now I'm scared that they're so big I'm going to have to get up at 3am to start them cooking so we can eat around 3-4pm.  For the pork since its going to be pulled anyway will chopping it into 2 or three smaller pieces speed up the cooking time? I think the brisket will have to be done over night and then reheated in the over nearer the time sadly.

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Smaller bits of meat will cook faster but the thing you are looking for with shoulder and brisket is that long slow cooking where the fat and collagen render and give you that soft, moist & flavorful finish. Smaller cuts also dry out more easily.

 

My experience of brisket is it doesn't take well to reheating, pork shoulder is a little more flexible as has a good fat content, but still its best on the day and fresh off the grill.

 

You can hold meat for quite some time if tightly wrapped in foil, towels and put in a cool box - its a technique you can easily read about online - you take the meat off the bbq a few degrees early and temp continues to rise for quite some time - its like extended resting for a couple of hours.

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The little recipe book that came with the grill says pork shoulder needs 1.5-2 hours per pound, and I have 11 pounds of shoulder on the way.  It also has a recipe for a 6 pound brisket which calls for between 7 & 10 hours cooking time and again I have 11 pounds to cook.

 

I think I'm going to have to start them off late Friday night and get the initial smoke stage done and then leave it cooking all night.

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I cooked my brisket last weekend for about 13hours on the smoker plus an hour in the oven to reach 200. I then put it in a cooler overnight.

 

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

 

 

 

 

Oh, if you need a good brisket guide look for BBQ with Franklin on YouTube

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

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11 minutes ago, Dynamo Nath said:

I cooked my brisket last weekend for about 13hours on the smoker plus an hour in the oven to reach 200. I then put it in a cooler overnight.

 

Oh, if you need a good brisket guide look for BBQ with Franklin on YouTube
 

 

Interesting, how long did you leave it in the cooler before serving then?

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Well the best laid plans of mice and men fell apart so it was in cooler till around 7am. Then I stuck it in the fridge till a couple of hours before serving when I warmed it back up slowly in the oven to around 150. Not the ideal way of doing it but it turned out great.

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

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First cook on the smoker today, couple of cheap as chips racks of ribs just to try it out. 

 

Just seasoned them with salt, pepper & paprika

IMG_8783.thumb.JPG.78c3e75d51dc1184054c34f92a5ce2f7.JPG

 

then into the grill for 3 hours at 225F

IMG_8784.thumb.JPG.bd52d589a304f23a28906ad4af7f000d.JPG

 

after the three hours was up I wrapped them in foil and put them back in for another hour. 

IMG_8789.thumb.JPG.cd9b426d9ee6cf96cbbf0209bc0e5d76.JPG

 

Final step was to unwrap, slather with BBQ sauce and back in for another half hour or so. 

 

In the end they looked like this:

IMG_8790.thumb.JPG.2919e9b1e0e39c7a37eb26dbdf052755.JPG

 

Using a smoker where you just set the dial to the temp you want is quite odd. I didn't go back and touch it for the first 3 hours. From a pure convinience point of view I can see this getting used way more frequently than the Weber. 

 

Next weekend will be the real test with two great big lumps of meat going on for a looooong cook. 

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First cook on the smoker today, couple of cheap as chips racks of ribs just to try it out. 
 
Just seasoned them with salt, pepper & paprika
IMG_8783.thumb.JPG.78c3e75d51dc1184054c34f92a5ce2f7.JPG
 
then into the grill for 3 hours at 225F
IMG_8784.thumb.JPG.bd52d589a304f23a28906ad4af7f000d.JPG
 
after the three hours was up I wrapped them in foil and put them back in for another hour. 
IMG_8789.thumb.JPG.cd9b426d9ee6cf96cbbf0209bc0e5d76.JPG
 
Final step was to unwrap, slather with BBQ sauce and back in for another half hour or so. 
 
In the end they looked like this:
IMG_8790.thumb.JPG.2919e9b1e0e39c7a37eb26dbdf052755.JPG
 
Using a smoker where you just set the dial to the temp you want is quite odd. I didn't go back and touch it for the first 3 hours. From a pure convinience point of view I can see this getting used way more frequently than the Weber. 
 
Next weekend will be the real test with two great big lumps of meat going on for a looooong cook. 


How did they taste? Nice and tender as well?

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

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