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Floshenbarnical

Cocktails

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I do love the Gilbert Scott at the renaissance but they are generally more fruity and floral cocktails - the bartenders can make most things though and are very well trained. 

 

Merchant house has a fantastic selection of spirits and they will add a pour of the main spirit alongside every cocktail, it's a fantastic experience to sit up at the bar and chat to the bartender. 

 

If it's acceptable distance then The Gibson is hands down my favourite bar in London, the menu is extensive but very well executed, staff are great and its a different experience to most bars, there is a strong emphasis on garnish and presentation, but also a huge amount of complexity and multi ingredient drinks. 

 

I also think anything in the Tony C family would fit the bill, Termini, Zetter townhouse or 69 Colebrooke Row. Complete opposite of the gibson, it's all simplicity and layers of flavour, very few ingredients. 

 

If you want to spec something off menu, ask for an "end of the road" - equal parts Campari, chartreuse and Laphroaig. It's incredibly bitter, and well, horrible, but I love it. 

 

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Just trying this summers trendy drink - white port and tonic (according to several papers recently)

 

Ocado had a special on Taylor's white port and it was only £12.

 

Neat it tasted like battery acid but is lovely with a tonic and lots of ice - tried Schweppes and Fever Tree mediterranean, both nice but the Schweppes better for me. I always think the Fever Tree stuff is overrated and too dominant in a drink, whereas the schweppes just adds to the spirit. 

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Just had a fantastic drink. 

 

20cl chartreuse

20cl campari

Dash of elixir vegetal 

Top with tonic 

 

It's a spritz, so don't skimp on the tonic. 

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On 16/07/2017 at 16:48, Gotters said:

Just trying this summers trendy drink - white port and tonic (according to several papers recently)

 

Why would you ruin white port with tonic?! If you enjoy white port and are feeling like a treat, splash out on a nice bottle of Amontillado or Palo Cortado sherry. I'd recommend the Harveys VORS. Quite possibly the most multi-layered and tantalising drink I have ever put in my mouth. Not a fan of Fino though. Ugh. There's a whole world of sherry cocktails out there too.

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Why add Tonic, firstly it tasted like shite on its own, and apparently that is a Portuguese thing to do with white port, its not a British bastardisation of it.

 

On 16/07/2017 at 16:48, Gotters said:

Neat it tasted like battery acid

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Ah my mistake I didn't read your post properly. I do love white port, maybe I've just been lucky. Only had it a couple of times.

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Just invented the Szechuan Martini

 

2 shots gin

1/2 sweet vermouth

1/2 dry vermouth

tablespoon crushed szechuan peppercorns

 

Stir with ice and double strain. Garnish with twist.

 

Let me know when they're all drinking it in Shoreditch.

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On 11/11/2017 at 22:17, Ravern said:

Just invented the Szechuan Martini

 

2 shots gin

1/2 sweet vermouth

1/2 dry vermouth

tablespoon crushed szechuan peppercorns

 

Stir with ice and double strain. Garnish with twist.

 

Let me know when they're all drinking it in Shoreditch.

 

That sounds pretty good! If you soak the Szechuan peppers in vodka, you basically make Electric Bitters, which would probably be better to add to your martini.

The Gibson (Old St) has a cocktail called the Electric Earl, which uses electric bitters and a szechuan flower garnish, it's really good.

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I've decided that my favourite cocktail is the Old Fashioned. 

 

1 x Demarara Sugar Cube

6 x dashes of bitters

Mix together until it's kind of a paste.

Add two shots of whisky (bourbon or blended scotch, it doesn't matter as long as it's decent whisky - Monkey Shoulder is excellent for this)

Stir

Add a big chunk of ice

Add some orange and lemon peel. 

 

Let it sit for a minute ... fucking bliss.

 

The Mojito comes a close second. 

 

Bad for your teeth though. :lol:

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On 14/07/2017 at 15:17, Gaz said:

 

If you want to spec something off menu, ask for an "end of the road" - equal parts Campari, chartreuse and Laphroaig. It's incredibly bitter, and well, horrible, but I love it. 

 

1

 

I hate to be that twat, but why on earth would you ruin a Laphroaig with all that? 

 

That sounds like three bold flavours all fighting for attention.

 

Having said that, The Last Word is my favourite cocktail, and that's hardly subtle. There's just something about using single malt in cocktails that rubs me up the wrong way...

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21 minutes ago, Isaac said:

 

I hate to be that twat, but why on earth would you ruin a Laphroaig with all that? 

 

That sounds like three bold flavours all fighting for attention.

 

Having said that, The Last Word is my favourite cocktail, and that's hardly subtle. There's just something about using single malt in cocktails that rubs me up the wrong way...

 

Try a Last Word with a peaty scotch and you might be converted - I think that one is in the Death & Co book actually (Pete's Word)  - there's something about scotch and chartreuse which really works.

And it is 3 competing flavours - but it becomes greater than the sum of it's parts. It's from a book called Beta Cocktails which is full of drinks that push the boundaries like that. 

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I love peaty scotch, so happy to give it a go, however I typically drink my scotch with a dash of distilled water.

 

Having said that, I definitely lean towards the bitter end of the cocktail spectrum.

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I only really drink scotch and water when I'm at a bar that doesn't have any decent beers or mixed drinks. 

 

At home 90% of the time ill make sours, and then it's almost always a daiquiri or a margherita 

 

I'm currently trying to dial in a recipe on a a daiquiri with Paranubes rum. 

 

It's a sugarcane rum from Mexico which has an Agricole sort of feel but is really unique, the aroma and taste is really savoury with notes of tomato, black olive and pepper 

 

I tried a 10:3:2 ratio last night but even with that little sugar I wasn't getting the crispness I wanted. I'm going to mix up a new batch of simple before I try again so that I can make sure it's at the right sweetness. 

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Has anyone got some (reasonably priced) recommendations for mixing equipment? I'm just starting to experiment with mixing drinks at home but I don't want to end up with some cheaply produced shite that won't hold up. The Cocktail Chemistry and HowtoDrink sites both have equipment lists but they link to Amazon.com which makes things pricy. 

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I got this one for my wife earlier this year. It seems pretty nice, without being hella expensive. I'm sure it's a level under true pro kit but I don't see anyone else being disappointed.

https://www.urbanbar.com/product/copper-plated-5-piece-cocktail-set/

 

They have a few different variations that can bring the price down a touch too. Amazon UK have zillions but I found it pretty hard to distinguish for quality on there.

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I fancy making some Old Fashioned cocktails this weekend. What recommendations for whiskey/bourbon/rye? {Preferably available in Sainsbury's ; but online is OK also of course). I may also use it to make Manhattans.

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On 23/09/2019 at 22:00, hub2 said:

I fancy making some Old Fashioned cocktails this weekend. What recommendations for whiskey/bourbon/rye? {Preferably available in Sainsbury's ; but online is OK also of course). I may also use it to make Manhattans.

 

I tend to cycle between Woodford Reserve and Gentleman Jack for those. Both tend to be on offer at £20 or so often enough to keep one on the go and the other spare (Amazon, Tesco etc). 

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On 22/09/2019 at 22:19, bear said:

Has anyone got some (reasonably priced) recommendations for mixing equipment? I'm just starting to experiment with mixing drinks at home but I don't want to end up with some cheaply produced shite that won't hold up. The Cocktail Chemistry and HowtoDrink sites both have equipment lists but they link to Amazon.com which makes things pricy. 

 

Koriko Tins are what I use, and the industry standard, and they cost less than £20.

https://www.cocktailkingdom.co.uk/set-of-two-korikor-weighted-shaking-tins?UseLoc=GB

 

Nisbets have a cheap version that looks basically the same
https://www.nisbets.co.uk/beaumont-mezclar-tin-on-tin-boston-cocktail-shaker-stainless-steel/

 

For stirring I think the Yarai glasses are quite nice, but I actually have a cut glass jug I found in a charity shop that does the job adequately.  The mixing spoon doesn't really matter as long as it's a decent length and twisted so you can stir easily.

 

Getting good jigggers is worthwhile, I've got a few that are annoying for various reasons, either hard to read or missing key measurements. 
I usually use one of these https://www.johnlewis.com/oxo-good-grips-mini-angled-measuring-cup/ with these for smaller measures https://www.johnlewis.com/john-lewis-partners-mini-measuring-jug-35ml-clear/

 

These ice cube trays - or a cheap equivalent from Home Sense really make a difference (Shake with one large and a few small ones)
https://www.cocktailkingdom.co.uk/all-barware/1-25in-square-ice-cube-tray
https://www.cocktailkingdom.co.uk/all-barware/2in-square-ice-cube-tray

 

 

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I got a bottle of seedlip really cheap from Holland and barret and after a few too many over Christmas decided to try it out in a cocktail. 

 

1oz Seedlip Garden

3/4oz lemon juice 

1/2oz simple syrup 

Top with 2oz tonic 

 

Really fresh, bitter and herbal. I popped a few drops of butterfly pea syrup in the bottom for colour but that's optional. 

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I made "Lemon Sherbet" from the Dead Rabbit Drinks Manual to be able to try a few of their recipes and I'm bowled over by it.

You make an oleo saccharum from lemon peels and then dissolve this into the juice - you end up with an intense, zingy, lemon syrup which basically tastes like lemon sherbet.

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18 hours ago, Gaz said:

I made "Lemon Sherbet" from the Dead Rabbit Drinks Manual to be able to try a few of their recipes and I'm bowled over by it.

You make an oleo saccharum from lemon peels and then dissolve this into the juice - you end up with an intense, zingy, lemon syrup which basically tastes like lemon sherbet.

 

I've had this book for quite a while now and and always been intimidated by it compared to others. They all seem to involve either a lot of prep or ingredients that are difficult to get outside the US, and I'm not sure what to substitute with. Can you suggest any that worked well for you?

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32 minutes ago, pledge said:

 

I've had this book for quite a while now and and always been intimidated by it compared to others. They all seem to involve either a lot of prep or ingredients that are difficult to get outside the US, and I'm not sure what to substitute with. Can you suggest any that worked well for you?


I think I've felt pretty much the same which is why I've decided to prep a bunch of the ingredients while I'm on lock down and can take the time. I choose a few that are common to several drinks I liked the sound of (lemon sherbet, pineapple cordial, chamomile tincture, pistachio syrup) - you can make these fairly easily and the last a few weeks if you have room in the fridge.

Once I've mixed up a couple I'll share here.

The Death & Co book is a lot more approachable if you are looking for something similar, or you can look up recipes from cocktail books on Kindred 

https://kindredcocktails.com/cocktail?scope=0&summary=1&created_by=Death %26 Co

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Cheers for the link @Gaz. I had the best cocktail of my life in Death & Co. Then LCD Soundsystem played over the speakers. Then James Murphy walked in. It was one of the best nights of my life; felt like being in a New York-set movie.  Now off to work out which cocktail it was and make it, if I have the ingredients (highly doubtful).

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3 hours ago, Gaz said:

Once I've mixed up a couple I'll share here.

 

Please do. The closest I got was making one of the basic syrups (orange blossom I think). If I can make anything close to what I've had there over the years I'll be happy, as seems unlikely I'll be back anytime soon,

 

I've been using https://www.diffordsguide.com as it lets you list what you can make with what you have, but all these sites are really basic in terms of then filtering it down. Like this is what I have, but today I feel like something X based, or this flavour - without having to completely adjust what your 'bar' contains.

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