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Marlowe
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Re: Under the Skin, it's so depressing to hear people say this is Johansson best film. She literally plays an emotionless robot for the best part of 90 minutes.

I won't disagree its an interesting, artsy film. But in no way should this be used as an acting masterclass.

(Lost in Translation is still my favourite Johansson film, and may just sneak into my top 10 ever. But it's mainly because of Murray)

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You can't remember if you thought Oblivion was a good movie?

Seriously?

Ah, so this is an attempt at a lazy brush-off. Quelle surprise.

As to Oblivion, I think I did enjoy it at the time but there was such a calculated blandness to the whole thing that it didn't leave any lasting impressions. It's a bit like asking someone for details of the meal they ate at a chain restaurant a few years ago.

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US Netflix has a show called "Cutthroat Kitchen. I saw it on the food network when I was in New York and ended up watching it for about three hours instead of going to bed, but I was pretty drunk and couldn't remember what it was called.

Anyway, it's on Netflix now and it's brilliant. It's like can't cook, won't cook with power ups. Each "Cheftestant" gets $25,000 which they can use to bid on things like replacing all of someone's cheese with cottage cheese in a round where they are making cheese burgers, or making someone do all of their cooking on a hot dog roller or with a tiny little saucepan.

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He sounded good to me (I'm from a Welsh family).

Took me 20 minutes to realise it was a Welsh accent, I lived in Wales for a few years and work with a gaggle of Welsh dudes.

Also Under the skin is fantastic, I think pointing out perceived failures in the storytelling is missing the point somewhat. The turning point for the character, her meeting with the disfigured man, is exactly half way through the film. So it's weird to hear it described as arriving "too late".

You don't even need Netflix, it's been happily sat on youtube for ages without anyone being bothered:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbF6WkcnoCI

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Also Under the skin is fantastic, I think pointing out perceived failures in the storytelling is missing the point somewhat. The turning point for the character, her meeting with the disfigured man, is exactly half way through the film. So it's weird to hear it described as arriving "too late".

Well, halfway through the film is around fifty minutes. Not too late to have a change of heart for the protagonist (actually a rather neat spot for it to happen) but too late to drop it on the viewer out of nowhere and expect them to just go along with it. There's nothing building to it. That's what I was waffling on about.

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Well, halfway through the film is around fifty minutes. Not too late to have a change of heart for the protagonist (actually a rather neat spot for it to happen) but too late to drop it on the viewer out of nowhere and expect them to just go along with it. There's nothing building to it. That's what I was waffling on about.

Was it out of nowhere though? Been a fair few months since I last watched it, but I seem to remember a few subtle hints leading up to that moment (like long looks at herself in the mirror).

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Well, halfway through the film is around fifty minutes. Not too late to have a change of heart for the protagonist (actually a rather neat spot for it to happen) but too late to drop it on the viewer out of nowhere and expect them to just go along with it. There's nothing building to it. That's what I was waffling on about.

The first alien in the almost opening scene looks directly at Scarlett and sheds a tear. The implication being that she firstly isn't dead, but simply catatonic or has been deactivated in some way. It stands to perfect reason that she was decommissioned/recalled on account of her developing the emotions which caused her to cry. Or perhaps her time was simply "up" and she was sad to be leaving earth, or sad that the project was continuing, or maybe tears of joy at being pulled from a place so horrible (maybe she was left catatonic by exposure to it!). Whatever the reason, she developed emotional responses during her time on earth. I immediately wondered if and when that would happen to Scarlett. The seed is already planted before we even see Scarlett in action.

Loads of people I've spoken to think they're "harvesting the meat" of the people, I came away thinking they were harvesting the skins (o use as further disguises for colonisation. Especially as you see it's a literal skin suit near the end, and after the frankly horrifying/beautiful moment the guy in the black goo becomes an empty skin-sack which floats around for a bit.I thought the meat slurry was going off to a furnace or similar? I suppose if they were discarding the skins and simply keeping the insides for whatever reason, it would also make sense in a wry sort of way that the aliens only valued what was "inside", but had to manipulate us with appeals to vanity/sexuality via our "outsides". Because we're so shallow etc etc. Or maybe it's both. Which way did others take it?

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In the novel it's made explicit that the

meat is being harvested for food for wealthy aliens. It is partly about factory farming and our attitude to animals and food.

The film is so different (not just in tone but even thematically) though that I think your interpretation is probably right. it is still ambiguous within the story the film tells I would say, which is cool.

Worth reading that btw, although the most effective thing about the book is the way you don't really realise what she is up to until about a third of the way in. Even though it is seen from her point of view. Without that surprise it loses something.

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Yeah I might give it a go. Given what you've said, the scene with the chocolate cake might make more sense. It's an alternative "treat" she's trying out as a replacement for the thing you mentioned, which she's no longer comfortable with eating. Perhaps.

Did I mention she gets her norks out worrrr 10/10 Daily Star

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In the novel it's made explicit that the

meat is being harvested for food for wealthy aliens. It is partly about factory farming and our attitude to animals and food.

The film is so different (not just in tone but even thematically) though that I think your interpretation is probably right. it is still ambiguous within the story the film tells I would say, which is cool.

Worth reading that btw, although the most effective thing about the book is the way you don't really realise what she is up to until about a third of the way in. Even though it is seen from her point of view. Without that surprise it loses something.

Great film, but

The bit with the baby. Didn't like that one bit.

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I've not signed up for the free trial yet so checking if anyone uses the 3d content and if there is anything worth viewing.

It will be on a smart TV.

I've just had a look on my Sony smart TV using unblockus and it dosent want to show me any 3D films on US Netflix.

Here's a list from 2013 though. http://www.reddit.com/r/netflix/comments/1n9xiu/list_of_3d_movies_currently_on_netflix/

Reading further it seems you need a PS3 or certain LG TV's for 3D films to show up on Netflix.

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