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cowfields
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If I look at an A6 piece of paper and imagine drawing on that, it looks okay because it's about the range of my wrist without moving my arm.

But in practice do you want double that?

The main tablets out there seem to be Wacom Bamboo, cheaper entry range, and Intuos.

Is it worth spending £150 odd for an Intuos over the £60 odd bamboo. I don't know how much I'll use it initially, over time, it'll be something I always go back to. Often for tracing hand drawings I think as it's just easier than scanning and trying to use illustrator to automatically trace, for example.

Or, is it worth getting a bigger Bamboo having a bigger drawing area, than a smaller but theoretically more advanced Intuos? Eg A4 Bamboo > A6 Intuos

What do people here use? The regular graphic illustrators here, what do you actually use?

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I went from a Bamboo A6 to an Intuos 4 Large... woha, I wouldn't want to go back.

Personally I really like the A6 to start with, so if you're unsure I would keep an eye out for one on sale and give one a go ~ They sometimes pop-up for £30 odd quid new.

I only use it for editing pictures in PS mind you.

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I'll mostly be using mine for illustrator type things. I do a lot of photoshoppy stuff but it's getting the lines I can't do without a tablet for.

Reading up on it though, and what the differences actually are - For once I'm going to be sensible. Not to go OMG BUY BUY BUY and go for the cheaper one I can afford. If I feel like the bamboo doesn't do what I need to, I could probably sell / return the bamboo and then invest in a bigger one. Or even just buy the bigger one and keep the smaller for work or whatever.

There's a good chance, not being able to try both and see the difference, I won't actually feel like the Bamboo is limited. If it becomes my most used accessory I'll know it's worth an upgrade. If I just trace a few lines now and then I'll rather have the £100 to spend on important things like shoes and beer.

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Way too much for me right now, but one day, I can see myself investing in something better.

I basically bought almost bottom of the range Wacom Bamboo, without touch, A6. It takes some getting used to but that's more the use of a tablet, than the actual device, and I'm sure that an intuos4 with angles and more pressure would be great. I can see that having some hot keys around the tablet would be a godsend though, but maybe I just need to reposition myself and the tablet so I can reach the keyboard.

An advantage of being left-handed but using a mouse with my right, I can actually use both at the same time like a boss.

Still It's really nice being able to sketch on the PC. On photoshop it's like a hybrid of sketching in a pad, oil painting, and graphic design, all at once, and I like the way I can recline and work rather than hunch over a mouse.

First 10 mins out of the box:

post-6709-050844400 1326443959_thumb.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Make sure you`ve got your pressure sensitivity set right on the preferences. I had it set wrong for years without realising :facepalm: . It can make a real difference . I think its the "tip feel" slider in your bamboo`s preferences. Also make sure you`re using a brush that supports that or make your own brushes/edit the existing ones.

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