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1 hour ago, bear said:

Does the wifi make a big difference to things? I haven't used one at all. 

 

I don’t think so. You can start the heating before you get home, but I boil a kettle and get it pretty close so I’m not starting with cold water straight from the tap. 

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8 hours ago, bear said:

Does the wifi make a big difference to things? I haven't used one at all. 

 

Yes. It's not about starting the heating before you get home, it's about being able to start cooking stuff entirely when you're not at home. Bag up, in the water, start it whenever suits you for when you need it done by. When you're cooking something for that sort of length of time, any time taken to warm up in the first place has no impact anyway.

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22 hours ago, psycho_fox said:

I'd say so. Cooking sous vide has been a massive hit with me and my partner. Steaks, chicken and especially duck breasts are amazing. I started off with resealable bags but soon got a vacuum sealer, which again has been excellent.

 

There seem to be loads of these sealers, which one are you using?

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11 hours ago, stefcha said:

 

Yes. It's not about starting the heating before you get home, it's about being able to start cooking stuff entirely when you're not at home. Bag up, in the water, start it whenever suits you for when you need it done by. When you're cooking something for that sort of length of time, any time taken to warm up in the first place has no impact anyway.

Do you find it does relatively short cooks ok that way? A friend found it overcooked his steaks if he left it to warm up. 

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28 minutes ago, psycho_fox said:

Do you find it does relatively short cooks ok that way? A friend found it overcooked his steaks if he left it to warm up. 

 

Short cooks I doubt I'd bother (although I don't use it for steak at all as I've found it a bit pointless, think they're better fully pan cooked) and tend to do the same as you albeit with the hot water tap rather than the kettle for those, that's all sub-hour stuff anyway, pork chops and the like. I did poached eggs from bed once though which included them being in for the warmup, they worked out fine by the time I trundled downstairs :) 

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39 minutes ago, stefcha said:

 

Short cooks I doubt I'd bother (although I don't use it for steak at all as I've found it a bit pointless, think they're better fully pan cooked) and tend to do the same as you albeit with the hot water tap rather than the kettle for those, that's all sub-hour stuff anyway, pork chops and the like. I did poached eggs from bed once though which included them being in for the warmup, they worked out fine by the time I trundled downstairs :) 

 

Haha! Love the laziness! I'll give it a try sometime with a beef joint, as that's typically around seven hours.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Little bit of a trial experience, I've just polished off a portion of 72-hour beef short rib (please excuse the messy kitchen side and the slightly fuzzy picture!):

IMG_20190216_205509.jpg

 

Roughly following this recipe, I went all the way down to 56°C rather than their 62. The meat ended up super beefy but at the lower temperature it still had an initial bite to it, which then almost immediately fell to pieces in the mouth. Amazing alongside some fried onions and creamy mash. Definitely worth a go. 

 

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  • 1 year later...

Just bumping this as I got the Anova wifi thing for my birthday. Sadly because I'm also dieting a bit I've not quite used it to its fullest potential (by that I mean ridiculous amounts of butter and potatoes) but on the other hand it's been amazing for chicken and turkey breasts. 

 

Seems like some mixed thoughts in this thread about whether it's actually a good thing to have or not. Personally I'm finding it's not the faff I thought it might be. Using the pot-of-water trick to seal the bags (since you are about to sous-vide, you have one ready anyway) I've been happy enough without a vacuum packer. And for example Chefsteps has a recipe for risotto, which surely will feel simpler than monitoring a pan constantly.

 

But I wondered if proper vacuum sealing is 'better' since you can't really eliminate all the air? I was put off by vacuum sealing as it felt like a lot of disposable plastic whereas I'm able to keep cleaning the ziploc bags we've got. 

 

Slowly cooking meat is obviously the go-to when people think sous vide but I'm really curious to know what other people have used it for. I remember @Gaz using it for pasteurising fruit. I've also seen a recipe to sous-vide pears and gin to make a nice pear gin.

 

I had some fails at doing eggs so i'm looking for tips on that. 

 

I'm just excited about the lesser knowns, and wondering what people have tried. 

 

For example I saw a recipe for sous vide kale: https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-kale that was interesting, especially when you consider how it might improve presentation. 

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34 minutes ago, cowfields said:

Just bumping this as I got the Anova wifi thing for my birthday. Sadly because I'm also dieting a bit I've not quite used it to its fullest potential (by that I mean ridiculous amounts of butter and potatoes) but on the other hand it's been amazing for chicken and turkey breasts. 

 

Seems like some mixed thoughts in this thread about whether it's actually a good thing to have or not. Personally I'm finding it's not the faff I thought it might be. Using the pot-of-water trick to seal the bags (since you are about to sous-vide, you have one ready anyway) I've been happy enough without a vacuum packer. And for example Chefsteps has a recipe for risotto, which surely will feel simpler than monitoring a pan constantly.

 

But I wondered if proper vacuum sealing is 'better' since you can't really eliminate all the air? I was put off by vacuum sealing as it felt like a lot of disposable plastic whereas I'm able to keep cleaning the ziploc bags we've got. 

 

Slowly cooking meat is obviously the go-to when people think sous vide but I'm really curious to know what other people have used it for. I remember @Gaz using it for pasteurising fruit. I've also seen a recipe to sous-vide pears and gin to make a nice pear gin.

 

I had some fails at doing eggs so i'm looking for tips on that. 

 

I'm just excited about the lesser knowns, and wondering what people have tried. 

 

For example I saw a recipe for sous vide kale: https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-kale that was interesting, especially when you consider how it might improve presentation. 


I have a vacuum sealer but as I use mine mostly for liquid it's pretty much useless anyway. What you can do is use a long bag and each time you cut the top off just clean it out and re-use it by sealing it again, you lose a bit of the length but it's fine.

The best thing I've made in the sous vide is a rhubarb and dill syrup which is just rhubarb and dill macerated in water at 50 degrees for an hour and then mixed with sugar, but it pulls all this delicious flavour out and it tastes fantastic just with sparkling water.

You can pretty much use the sous vide for any sort of maceration where you want to get the fresh flavour rather than the cooked fruit, the dill syrup is from this cocktail book which has a few similar things 

Sous Vide burgers are great. I get the retired dairy beef burgers from Turner and George, sous vide so they are perfectly medium rare and then a quick sear.

@redbloodcel might have some tips too. He's done mashed potato which seems to work well in the sous vide, stick all that lovely potato and butter you are avoiding into the bag and then mush it up before you cut the seal. 

Of course, I could have just replaced this whole post with a link to Sous Vide Everything. He's got a video where he poaches eggs right in the shells and shows you the results at different timings which would be a good place to start.

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Great thanks! 

I have yet to do potato but I might this weekend actually, as I think we're having pork chops too so that could be a good idea. I also bought a fine meshed sieve to help me get things nice and puree'd, mostly because I wanted to get that kind of fine dining 'swoosh' where some vegetable has become inconceivably smooth. 

 

I should definitely try some fruit though, Natoora releasing their chef app to consumers since lockdown has been really good for discovering some less common varieties of things and I've just noticed they've got bergamots coming in, which is quite exciting, and I'm sure there's potential for some exciting syrup to come out of that. 

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1 hour ago, cowfields said:

Great thanks! 

I have yet to do potato but I might this weekend actually, as I think we're having pork chops too so that could be a good idea. I also bought a fine meshed sieve to help me get things nice and puree'd, mostly because I wanted to get that kind of fine dining 'swoosh' where some vegetable has become inconceivably smooth. 

 

I should definitely try some fruit though, Natoora releasing their chef app to consumers since lockdown has been really good for discovering some less common varieties of things and I've just noticed they've got bergamots coming in, which is quite exciting, and I'm sure there's potential for some exciting syrup to come out of that. 


Bergamot is great but, don't try to make Bergamocello because it tastes like soap. 

This is a fantastic cocktail using Bergamot Syrup. I've made it with the fresh juice too, and that works.
 

BUONGIORNO

1 oz St. George Terroir Gin
1 oz Aperol
1 oz lemon juice
1 oz bergamot simple syrup
1 oz egg white

 

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On 14/10/2020 at 10:22, Gaz said:


I have a vacuum sealer but as I use mine mostly for liquid it's pretty much useless anyway. What you can do is use a long bag and each time you cut the top off just clean it out and re-use it by sealing it again, you lose a bit of the length but it's fine.

The best thing I've made in the sous vide is a rhubarb and dill syrup which is just rhubarb and dill macerated in water at 50 degrees for an hour and then mixed with sugar, but it pulls all this delicious flavour out and it tastes fantastic just with sparkling water.

You can pretty much use the sous vide for any sort of maceration where you want to get the fresh flavour rather than the cooked fruit, the dill syrup is from this cocktail book which has a few similar things 

Sous Vide burgers are great. I get the retired dairy beef burgers from Turner and George, sous vide so they are perfectly medium rare and then a quick sear.

@redbloodcel might have some tips too. He's done mashed potato which seems to work well in the sous vide, stick all that lovely potato and butter you are avoiding into the bag and then mush it up before you cut the seal. 

Of course, I could have just replaced this whole post with a link to Sous Vide Everything. He's got a video where he poaches eggs right in the shells and shows you the results at different timings which would be a good place to start.

 

Sous Vide Everything's SV mashed potatoes are possibly the best I've ever had. Though they're pretty hedonistic with so much butter and cream cheese.

 

Just mentioning them makes me want them right now though.

 

I've never had a vacuum sealer, and have used ziplock bags for years. It's always been fine, but I think there are dishes where I'd get slightly better results with a sealer. But I'm fairly happy with the quality/waste trade-off.

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