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Suede Suede Suede


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10 minutes ago, Stanley said:

What is the suggested track order for DMS?

 

Gets rid of The Power and Black & Blue and adds two of their strongest B-Sides of that era.

 

Introducing The Band

We Are The Pigs

Heroine

The Wild Ones

Daddy's Speeding

My Dark Star

Killing Of A Flash Boy

New Generation

This Hollywood Life

The 2 Of Us

The Asphalt World

Still Life

 

The climax of Daddy's Speeding, followed by the fade-in on My Dark Star is just damned perfect. You'll need Sci-Fi Lullabies for My Dark Star and Flash Boy (or the original singles, I guess).

 

He also did an alternative listing for the debut that put My Insatiable One and The Birds in there, but I prefer the stock version - it's more of a coherent album than stock DMS. There was some kind of comment about they thought at the time that it was very important not to re-use tracks they'd already released on early singles, but in retrospect, that was a mistake.

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8 hours ago, strider said:

The Stay Together single is probably their best. Every track on it is incredible.

 

Yup - The Living Dead will always probably be my favourite track by them but all 3 tracks are amazing.

11 hours ago, Alexlotl said:

 

Gets rid of The Power and Black & Blue and adds two of their strongest B-Sides of that era.

 

Introducing The Band

We Are The Pigs

Heroine

The Wild Ones

Daddy's Speeding

My Dark Star

Killing Of A Flash Boy

New Generation

This Hollywood Life

The 2 Of Us

The Asphalt World

Still Life

 

The climax of Daddy's Speeding, followed by the fade-in on My Dark Star is just damned perfect. You'll need Sci-Fi Lullabies for My Dark Star and Flash Boy (or the original singles, I guess).

 

He also did an alternative listing for the debut that put My Insatiable One and The Birds in there, but I prefer the stock version - it's more of a coherent album than stock DMS. There was some kind of comment about they thought at the time that it was very important not to re-use tracks they'd already released on early singles, but in retrospect, that was a mistake.

 

Interesting track listing but I wouldn't lose The Power (they can keep Black and Blue).  Stay Together probably belongs on the record too really, maybe in preference to The 2 of Us (or over Flashboy great a song as it is).

 

My Insatiable One really should have been on Suede - Suede

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32 minutes ago, dreamylittledream said:

maybe in preference to The 2 of Us

 

No. DEFINITIVELY NOT. The 2 of Us is one of the best tracks on the album and one of their best written songs full-stop. I think it might actually epitomise the mood of the album better than any other track on it, not least because of how the central image ties in with the cover artwork.

 

I love Stay Together but I don't think it'd work on the album really, it's ideal standalone single material. Even by early Suede standards it's over the top to the point of bordering on being a bit silly and would probably overpower the surrounding tracks in the context of an album. I could possibly see an argument for putting the full version last or something but then the album wouldn't go out on Still Life so fuck that.

 

It's fun to debate but personally I feel like Dog Man Star is just fine as it is.

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2 minutes ago, Rsdio said:

 

No. DEFINITIVELY NOT. The 2 of Us is one of the best tracks on the album and one of their best written songs full-stop.

 

I love Stay Together but I don't think it'd work on the album really, it's ideal standalone single material. Even by early Suede standards it's over the top to the point of bordering on being a bit silly and would probably overpower the surrounding tracks in the context of an album. I could possibly see an argument for putting the full version last or something but then the album wouldn't go out on Still Life so fuck that.

 

It's fun to debate but personally I feel like Dog Man Star is just fine as it is.

 

Meh - I mean I don't dislike it but it is a tad maudlin and meandering so I might be inclined to skip it on occasion and I certainly wouldn't rate inside my favourite um 20 Suede tracks but y'know opinions and all that.

 

Thematically I think Stay Together would fit wonderfully on DMS, the question would be where to place it - maybe earlier on between The Wild Ones and Daddy's Speeding.

 

But you are probably right - it hangs together beautifully as an album and doesn't really need altering...

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20 hours ago, DeciderVT said:


I went digging for this as well, found the post and ended up making a playlist:

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-02 at 12.50.06.png

 

(Spotify embed code doesn't work here.)

Added The Living Dead myself, because I couldn't do without that song.

 

 

Stop the press!

 

Confusion over the sequencing of This Hollywood Life and New Generation made me go back and check my sources. I originally read this on the pages on the Suede site around the DMS Deluxe re-issue, but those are long gone. But I thought maybe the info was reproduce in the deluxe booklet, and found someone had uploaded a scan to Scribd. Turns out, either the two sources had different info, or I was misremembering, as here's what's in the booklet:

 

Introducing The Band
We Are The Pigs
Heroine
The Wild Ones
Daddy's Speeding
My Dark Star
Killing Of A Flashboy

This Hollywood Life
New Generation

Living Dead
The 2 Of Us
Asphalt World
Still Life

 

So that's This Hollywood Life and New Generation swapped from the album order, and My Dark Star, Killing of a Flashboy *and* Living Dead added in, so no need to live without it.

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Just blasted through Coal Black Mornings in two days and have to agree with the positive sentiments about it here. Not a huge fan of Anderson's writing style (it actually seemed a bit limited- how many times did he start a sentence with "indeed"?) but it paints an interesting picture of the gulf between his years in poverty and the popular image of Suede as a group of "well-connected London elites". Even his assertion about withdrawing socially in groups of people might be why some people I know who have met him thought that he was a bit rude.

By far the greatest sadness about the book was how much London has changed since he was living hand-to-mouth in areas like Notting Hill, flitting from one place to another, signing on and having enough time to breathe between his early failures and shaping Suede into the band they eventually became. That level of freedom on a shoestring seems absolutely impossible now, and Anderson's observation about members of even well-known bands now needing to work part-time jobs was as depressing as the description of his dad's car.

The barbs toward Blur were great too. There's still a palpable feeling of resentment toward Albarn over Frischmann (despite the breakup making him hone his craft) and Albarn's cultural tourism of the working class, which has changed my feelings toward "Charmless Man" a bit. Albarn comes across as a bit of a bully in that regard, casting Anderson almost as someone with ideas above their station.

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3 hours ago, smac said:

Have a look at the book I mentioned upthread, 'The Last Party' by John Harris; a general coverage of the whole Britpop scene, but you get some interesting quotes from Frischmann about both Anderson and Albarn. And yes, Albarn comes across as a bit of a dick.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Party-Britpop-Demise-English/dp/0007134738/


I read that in... *checks date of Indian Ocean tsunami* ... wow, 2004. Can't remember a word of it now, of course. :(

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Well, it isn't world-shattering stuff. Unlike a tsunami. I just picked it up from a charity shop recently, and found it an interesting read, despite not being into that many of the bands involved. Just Suede, really, and a lot of that is down to Bernard Butler's playing on the early stuff.

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Well on the first couple listens I’m less sure, it’s turned the gothic up beyond  11 and on more than more one occasion just feels self indulgent (unleash the chanting monks, Bach tinged guitar riffs, looming string sections and lets rock) and what the hell is Roadkill supposed to be?  There’s a bit too much drama here that’s missing the married needling hooks of DMS

 

There are some clearly great songs on there however; Flytipping is gorgeous, Cold Hands is a glam stomp that seems to have wandered off completely different record and Life is Golden is a classic Suede pop song.  But I’m less than convinced it hangs together as an album as yet, especially given its supposed to a listen as a whole concept piece 

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I know it's traditional to say every Suede album is "their best since Dog Man Star!" but this is, it really really is. It's right up there.

 

So many good moments. Life is Golden is their best song in years. In Cold Hands Brett effortlessly summons up the imperial swagger of his 25-years-younger self and it stops me in my tracks every time. The final build-up of Flytipping is perfect. I wasn't sure about The Invisibles on first listen but in the context of the album it makes sense. I think thematically it all holds together, too. The lyrics are significantly better than anything they've done for a very long time; apparently Brett wrote this album alongside his childhood memoirs, Coal Black Mornings, and it shows, there are a lot of references to childhood in here and not a happy one either.

 

I love it, I've been enthusing about it all week to anyone who'll listen and it's totally restored my faith in the band pretty much at the exact point I'd given up expecting anything of note from them any more.

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Okay so another dozen or so listens and I've done an almost complete volte face.  It is in fact really rather good.  As in really, really good.

 

I still don't get Roadkill (just say no to spoken word poems in the middle of albums kids) and Tides lands the wrong side of overwraught epic but the rest of the record is quite stunning once it sinks the hooks in - its no exaggeration that Suede haven't managed quite such a consistent run of tracks as the set from opener As One to Life is Golden and whilst the closing trio sound almost like they belong in a musical rather than a indie rock record they are powerful as hell.  I enjoyed both Bloodsports and Night Thoughts but they were both erratic and lost pace in their closing halves - not the case here.

 

And a massive shout out to Richard Oakes here - the spidery, thundering guitar lines he throws down here are almost on par with anything Bernard managed - that riff on Don't Be Afraid if Nobody Loves You is immense.

 

So place in the discography?  Well its certainly the most Dog Man Star like record they've produced since 1994, but if we're considering ordering Sci Fi Lullabies probably post dates that and I have a massive soft spot for Coming Up I'm going to have to place it a firm but fair 5th best Suede album.

 

But who the hell would have thought they could have come up with something like this nearly 30 years into their career?

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So agree about Richard Oakes, Bernard Butler always gets the plaudits when it comes to Suede and fair enough he's one of my favourite guitarists ever, but it must do Richard's head in, his playing throughout this record is exemplary placing him on the map of great British players, up there with Mick Ronson imo.

 

The bit in Life is Golden when Brett sings "with your beautiful words" and Richard's guitar snakes around his beautiful words is just sheer :o

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I was a huge Suede fan back in the 90s (I was even at the legendary B-Sides gig) but I stopped paying attention to them years ago because, frankly, they became shit.

 

I gave the new album a listen after reading the enthusiasm on here from you guys, and you know what? You're absolutely right. It's fantastic. What a wonderful surprise it is to have another good Suede album after all these years! Life is Golden is one of the best songs they've ever done! What are the chances?

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On 28/09/2018 at 09:00, Stanley said:

So agree about Richard Oakes, Bernard Butler always gets the plaudits when it comes to Suede and fair enough he's one of my favourite guitarists ever, but it must do Richard's head in, his playing throughout this record is exemplary placing him on the map of great British players, up there with Mick Ronson imo.


Probably the same way that Carlos Alomar feels every time someone brings Mick Ronson up as Bowie's guitar player. ;)

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Absolutely love the new album, apart from Roadkill it just nails it. But for me, it doesn't come close to Night Thoughts. For me that's one of my favourite albums that just consistently hits it out of the park on every song. I can just close my eyes and totally get lost in it.

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