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The Things We Take For Granted


Harsin
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Wasn't 'battery back up' the name given to cartridges which could actually save information about your session? Did Mario 3 on the NES have that, or did you have to play it all through at once?

So named because they had an actual battery in them - I think if you buy really old games with them now there's a chance they may be flat and won't save your game. I think Mario 3 had it but then again I've played that on other consoles more than the NES so I could be wrong.

I remember the days of those hellishly long passwords though, I guess they were like encrypted data so that it work out a password for your current health/items for where you were, not just a single password for each level kind of thing. I think the original Metroid worked like that didn't it?

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Goldeneye had a double joypad configuration that did it.

True.

Trying to think if any FPS games on the PS1 had twin stick controls, pre-Goldeneye. The Playstation Analog Pad came out in April 2007, whereas Goldeneye was released in August that same year - so you'd be looking for an FPS that fits into that 4 month window. I sincerely doubt one exists though, as the Analog Pad wasn't widely adopted until the Dual Shock came along, which was after Goldeneye.

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True.

Trying to think if any FPS games on the PS1 had twin stick controls, pre-Goldeneye. The Playstation Analog Pad came out in April 2007, whereas Goldeneye was released in August that same year - so you'd be looking for an FPS that fits into that 4 month window. I sincerely doubt one exists though, as the Analog Pad wasn't widely adopted until the Dual Shock came along, which was after Goldeneye.

Quake 2 and Alien Ressurection both had twin stick controls on the PS1. I think the Medal of Honor games may have had dual analogue stick controls as well.

Edit: Ah, pre Goldeneye. Probably not. But then, I suppose you could say these were the first single pad twin stick controlled FPS'.

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I remember some Mega Drive games giving out passwords at the end of levels to enable you to start from mid-way through. Rolling Thunder 2 was one example, I think. Maybe Desert Strike and its sequels as well? So, in spirit, action games were reaching the point where you weren't expected to do them all in one sitting.

Wonderboy 3 on the Master System was able to save your state in a 7 character string. I dare say it wasn't the first.

WE5T ONE was the code that gave you everything.

Edit: No it was 14 characters, WE5T 0NE 0000 000

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The humble amaray. Cheap, smart, durable and universal. A leap above everything that came before, especially in the EU. The old Saturn cases were a nightmare that ended up scratching disks, while the PlayStation cases were ridiculously fragile even by jewel case standards.

Megadrive boxes deserve a special mention for being almost as good.

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I vaguely remembering having a DVD in one of those years ago. Still a shame, since it's a false economy. Still, they're bound to be less shit than Saturn boxes by default.

In Sega's defence, I've just remembered 60hz mode. Thankyou Sega! :wub:

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For me it's being able to cheaply rent games from Lovefilm which I can keep for as long as I want. I now play every game that I want to, and if I don't like them then I can just send them back.

In the older days, the only time I got to play new/other games was to exchange games with each other for a few days, or perhaps when I got a new game for my birthday etc.

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Rumble feedback in games. Was it the Dualshock or the Rumble Pak for the N64 that did it first, or was there a PC controller which had it years before?

In my mind Starfox 64/Lylat wars was the first game to support it, with the rumble pack distributed with the game

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Recharging Health: Again a Halo game (the first to be precise) is my first personal recollection of the use of this mechanic, well a hybrid system of the traditional health bar with a layer of recharging shield over the top, but I'm sure that wasn't actually the first use in games full stop.

Halo might have been the first FPS to give a human character recharging shields, but it was used for vehicles long before that: X-Wing, for example.

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Regular Checkpoints/Unlimited Lives/more forgiving deaths. A few gens ago dying meant going back to the start, or after a couple of lives having a game over sign and starting the level again. Now dying isn't the end of the (gaming) world, at worst it has set you back a few seconds. I suppose this also ties in with the health recovery system, where death isn't instant allowing the player more of a chance to get on with the game

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I wonder if people had this discussion 10 years and were saying "wow, medkits eh? What a great invention. Remember when there was no way of getting your health back after you got hit? Nightmare!"

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G-Police has recharging health of a sort, and I think Syndicate had it too (or was that only with the right mods?)

Then again in both these examples the recharge wasn't as instant as in Bungie's game...

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I wonder if people had this discussion 10 years and were saying "wow, medkits eh? What a great invention. Remember when there was no way of getting your health back after you got hit? Nightmare!"

Roast chicken/pizza hidden in an oil drum/phonebox.

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Physics in games: Not sure if it was the first but I remember playing the demo of Far Cry and the first time I saw a barrel roll down some stairs. In that single moment I saw something amazing and new, yet at the same time that's exactly what a barrel should do, so it looked utterly familiar and right.

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Actually loading is a good one. I know Davros was jesting, but they're so much better now that they were in the PS1 era. We're so used to huge, open worlds streaming seamlessly off the disc that it's jarring to encounter mid-level loads now. I guess that's quite a recent development and there are still plenty of games with long loads.

I remember Halo had tiny loading pauses every now and then, but I honestly can't remember when they managed to phase them out. Did Halos 2 and 3 have them?

Motorstorm Apocolypse says hello! I was astounded at how long the loading was in this. Each race was like booting the game up from the dashboard.

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Motorstorm Apocolypse says hello! I was astounded at how long the loading was in this. Each race was like booting the game up from the dashboard.

You're right, PS3 games seem to be much worse for it.

Having an iPhone to fiddle with during loading screens takes the sting out of it these days. No need to make endless cups of tea.

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Motorstorm Apocolypse says hello! I was astounded at how long the loading was in this. Each race was like booting the game up from the dashboard.

In its defence it does have pretty much instart restarts once its loaded though.. which are very much needed I might add!

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Could you save your game to tape?

Yes

from the earliest 8 bits with tape drives could save games on tape (zx81, vic20, PET and god the Atari 400/800 and others). Even further back than that on mainframes where there were games where you could save Zork for instance.

Otherwise I would've got very pissed off with Football manager on the Vic-20 :) and indeed the text adventure Pirates Cover on the same machine.

As for consoles? pah who cares when they got save games ;) they were late to the party in UK. Young whipper snappers today with their revisionist views on what was popular back in the 80's ;) (NES and Master System didnt appear til 86/87 remember and by then the 16 bit computers were well underway :) )

Edit - should really comment on topic as well> what do we take for granted?

EVERYTHING...

Colour graphics

More than 8/16/256/4096 colours etc

Music that isnt chiptunes... I know chiptunes are fantasmagorical (im looking at you SID) but fullon soundtracks etc

loading a game in less than 5 mins

reliable media.. i.e. not tapes and even dodgy floppy disks

decent plot story expositon that doesnt require a novella in the box :)

3D gfx that arent isometric

3d polygon games with framerates in double figures.

The above is why I chuckle everytime I read a single post on any forum with someone whinging about such and sucha game having 30fps or a resolution that isnt quite "HD" etc etc etc

Dont get me wrong I whinge as much as the next person... but if you showed the 11 year old me the games of today he'd probably explode ;)

:blah: :blah: :blah: :blah:

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I was thinking about the number of game mechanics that are considered the norm nowadays and was wondering where most of them sprang from.

Recharging Health: Again a Halo game (the first to be precise) is my first personal recollection of the use of this mechanic, well a hybrid system of the traditional health bar with a layer of recharging shield over the top, but I'm sure that wasn't actually the first use in games full stop.

Elite had it for ship shields as I recall :blah:

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