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Speedruns

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I've watched a few, for games I love or old games I'm interested in, but I always find them impossibly boring. I always envy the memory/dexterity of the person doing them, but they're about as far away from entertainment as you can get, surely.

Anyone on the forum done one or interested by them? Explain and show your working.

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Are you serious? I find them really fun, ive even watched the same one multiple times. Metroid ones are often spectacular, Half Life and Quake engine games show some outrageous skill jumping and physics exploitations. Probably something to do with what I do with games, I dont like discarding after one play though, i'l replay and replay just learning the nuances. So anyway yeah I find them hugely entertaining.

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I could finish Resident Evil 2 within 2 hours 8) Often times me and a mate would do several rounds of X-Men Vs. Street Figher on the Saturn (with the 4 MB ram pack, we were pro) followed by a full run of RE2 on the PlayStation. Good times :D I swear I have finished RE2 over 25 times in total.

So yeah... uhm... speedruns. I am too old for em now :)

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Weird, for some reason I was reading about Metroid Prime speed runs just the other minute.

I like reading about sequence breaking in particular. I can't help but have some admiration for people who spend ages experimenting with a game and work out all kinds of techniques to avoid having to pick up certain items or visit certain locations to advance through the game. Metroid and Zelda seem to be ripe for this kind of thing. It's quite impressive how determined and innovative some of them are, especially when the developers actively try and limit the possibilities.

The only time I've ever worked on speed runs was when I got all the cheats on Golden Eye many moons ago. Never again.

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I think the reason they irk me is because I love to see games played stylishly well (Sandy Ravage's Call of Duty gameplay or Saur's Devil May Cry or Bayonetta stuff, all on Youtube, for example), but stupidly fast runthroughs just leave me cold.

I got past a tricky bit on Legendary Halo Reach last night, and wanted to see how a better player would handle it on youtube, only to be met by a guy despawning tanks and avoiding whole battles via unconventional shortcuts. I just don't see the point.

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i played alex kidd in miracle world the other day and couldn't remember the stone, paper scissors order for the first guy and ended up drawing with him about nine times before he finally beat me. i suck, but it was funny.

i watched a few mirror's edge speed runs after i'd finally beaten the times set by the game and it was cool to see how other people had solved the same problems. i like to play the same few games over and over again rather than constantly be moving on to the next thing, so i guess i'd watch a speed run video as much for educational purposes (to improve my own play) as for entertainment - it feels good to be good at something. and i've watched sonic 2 and a halo 3 single level run before. the sonic 2 thing i watched was mostly unremarkable because i already had pretty good routes myself (maybe there was awesome stuff later after i got bored), but the halo 3 one was really cool and i had a bunch of fun using some of what i'd learnt to navigate certain levels in different ways, and then learning to read the other levels more critically as well and look for other ways of doing stuff.

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I think the reason they irk me is because I love to see games played stylishly well (Sandy Ravage's Call of Duty gameplay or Saur's Devil May Cry or Bayonetta stuff, all on Youtube, for example), but stupidly fast runthroughs just leave me cold.

only to be met by a guy despawning tanks and avoiding whole battles via unconventional shortcuts. I just don't see the point.

Yeah, the difference is the first guy is playing stylishly well as you say, the second guy knows the game and its mechanics. For instance, I know that if the player runs 'x' metres away from an enemy in HALO they stopping following - the player can turn around and get free shots on them. It's more of reverse engineering the game or having so much knowledge of it that it becomes a trial and error task which can be replicated perfectly.

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I think the reason they irk me is because I love to see games played stylishly well (Sandy Ravage's Call of Duty gameplay or Saur's Devil May Cry or Bayonetta stuff, all on Youtube, for example), but stupidly fast runthroughs just leave me cold.

I got past a tricky bit on Legendary Halo Reach last night, and wanted to see how a better player would handle it on youtube, only to be met by a guy despawning tanks and avoiding whole battles via unconventional shortcuts. I just don't see the point.

If you want to see a speed run with some incredible and entertaining skillz then I recommend this one of Mario 64 (120 stars) that was recently done for a charity tournament. In fact I recommend it to everyone, it really is phenomenal. WARNING: nerds.

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Speed runs don't particularly interest me, but I do admire the skill in them. It's not a speed run per se, but the Deus Ex Ultimate Run (no items, no biomods, no money, no augmentations, no skills. Realistic difficulty setting.) is probably the best I've seen.

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i was watching a Resident Evil 5 co-op speedrun the other day - quite interesting to see parts of the early maps i never really knew existed. as a few of the levels end after a set time, they just holed up and occasionally picked off some dudes if they came too near.

it did become a bit boring after a while, but they never used any exploits or bugs - just timing and memory.

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Conkers Bad Fur Day, N64. 100% complete: 3 hrs with cutscenes. Skipping cutscenes: 45 minutes.

Banjo Tooie, N64, 100% all collectables: 3 hrs 15 minutes (IIRC).

Cant even remember the Perfect Dark hardest difficulty run times..

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If you want to see a speed run with some incredible and entertaining skillz then I recommend this one of Mario 64 (120 stars) that was recently done for a charity tournament. In fact I recommend it to everyone, it really is phenomenal. WARNING: nerds.

This looks fantastic. I've only watched 10 minutes or so, but it's already brought a grin to my face several times. The Koopa footrace needs a 'deal with it' gif. :lol:

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I love time attacking - I just see it as the same thing as aiming for good lap times in a racing game, but applied to different genres. However, I only do it in games with user-friendly displays of current and record times, which is why I prefer to call it time attacking - I can't be bothered with speedrunning games with no in-built timer. They're fun to watch, but to make one you need to rely on demo-recording, frame-counting and stopwatch-timing and other manual things that are way too much effort for me!

I like watching tool-assisted speedruns, but I've only ever tried to make one once: I played through a Sonic 2 level frame-by-frame, and ended up with a worse time than I could do normally, because playing it at 1/30 speed made it impossible to judge Sonic's momentum! :lol:

In addition to user-friendly presentation of record times, the other big thing that'll get me time attacking a game is to have some initial reward for decent times, to show off how fun the game can be when aiming for speed above all else. The presence of the cheats in GoldenEye and Perfect Dark is probably the biggest reason they're my favourite ever games for time attacking.

The Sonic games are probably the best illustration of how displaying and saving of record times can get me into time attacking, but I won't bother if they're not saved. I remember trying to do Green Hill 1/Emerald Hill 1 on the Mega Drive versions in under 30 seconds, but other than that the only levels I ever bothered speedrunning were the ones in Sonic 3's multiplayer race levels, which did save lap records. I didn't try time attacking levels in the main games until I got Sonic Jam with its dedicated Time Attack mode. Unfortunately that mode uses slightly altered level layouts compared to the originals, so when I encountered The Sonic Centre website and wanted to start competing, I reverted back to the original versions. But by that time I was hooked, so I was prepared to keep track of my times the old fashioned way - a pen and paper and a VHS recorder!

Also, one thing that puts me at odds with most people who time attack and speedrun is that I prefer to stick largely to what the developers intended. Completing objectives in unconventional orders and subtle exploits of bugs are OK to me, but I don't have any interest in things like glitching my way through large parts of scenery like this (though they're fun to watch):

I used to hold The Sonic Centre's record times for Metropolis Zone 1 and 3 until people started using exploits like that. :angry:

:o

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A new GoldenEye tool-assisted speedrun just popped up on my Youtube subscriptions:

I've only watched half of it, but the

has been the highlight so far.
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I had a lot of things to do today. They have not been done, and now it's going to be a stressful push to Friday.

At least I can always look back on Tuesday the 12th of April 2011 as the day I watched archived footage of 4 dudes on the internet race to complete Ocarina of Time.

I need to close the tab for speeddemosarchive.com and wipe my history, or Blast Corps will be next.

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Indeed. I agree with you in terms of how boring they can be. Before today I had only ever watched 2 or 3 short youtube runs for a nostalgia fix. But I'd generally rather be playing a game than watching someone exploit their way through it.

Unfortunately the site Comrade introduced adds in the missing ingredient of strangers talking shit about each other.

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