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JoeK

The Miniatures Appreciation Thread

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17 minutes ago, Mikes said:

Hey, @JoeK, are these our work?  They look awesome.

 

Arcworlde-Beastfolk-Warploque-Miniatures

 

 

 

Not mine - all Alex's (the sculptor and owner of Arcworlde) work! Effectively, he's a colossal cheapskate and can't afford my services :p . But quite honestly I don't think he needs to anyway as he's a really decent painter. I had dinner with him a couple of weeks ago and they were there - they're really great figures indeed!

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On closer inspection they do look more straightforward in their scheme than your artsy style. Still good though. Wouldn't have been great to see what you would have done with them.

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When you talented bastards were starting out how long did it take you to get flats down? I see some people bang minis out in a couple of hours and I realise it takes years of practice to get there, I just wondered what's normal to say do all the blocking in of colours before getting to the nitty gritty.

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Depends on the model. Space Marines - spray paint the fuckers and you’re 90% there. 
I can paint some things quickly to my tabletop standard, just minimise number of colours and use a big brush and rely on good old agrax to cover any wonky joins. 

 

Though I find the blocking in really boring, some take ages before you get to the fun bits. 

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I've been making a concerted effort to not spend forever on correcting mistakes because I was following the "just get it on there" rule but I'm a cack handed chimp at the best of times so I'm concentrating on trying not to be so loose. This is 70 minutes work and it's a little disheartening that it takes so long to achieve what looks like so little. I know it has to be done and the details aren't the majority of the work but still.

 

 

bear.jpg

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12 hours ago, moosegrinder said:

I've been making a concerted effort to not spend forever on correcting mistakes because I was following the "just get it on there" rule but I'm a cack handed chimp at the best of times so I'm concentrating on trying not to be so loose. This is 70 minutes work and it's a little disheartening that it takes so long to achieve what looks like so little. I know it has to be done and the details aren't the majority of the work but still.

 

Looks fine mate. And you *will* pick up speed. Just keep at it.

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@moosegrinder The good painters might disagree with this approach, but : 

I see your problem, you're being neat when you don't need to. 

You see, paint, it goes over other paint. So when you paint that guy, get a big brush and splash on loads of (2 thin coats ) of red and don't worry about getting it anywhere else, then do the same for his skirt or whatever is the next biggest bit to colour that doesn't touch the red body, then you've based 75% of the min in 5 minutes. THEN start being careful as you do the next bits. It will make you loads faster. 

 

Though as I found out the hard way this approach absolutely does not work for contrast paints. 

 

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See that's what I thought but I found myself having to touch up again and again and again . I don't know if it's paint consistency, aforementioned cack handedness or just because my hands aren't particularly steady but it seems to take forever no matter what I do.

 

IMG_20190922_151724-2218x3943.thumb.jpg.d24f1e812d99409efb7bd19aeb88ae6e.jpg

 

Another hour and half but I started making stupid mistakes so I think that's me done for today unless I get the urge after tea.

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12 minutes ago, moosegrinder said:

See that's what I thought but I found myself having to touch up again and again and again . I don't know if it's paint consistency, aforementioned cack handedness or just because my hands aren't particularly steady but it seems to take forever no matter what I do.

 

IMG_20190922_151724-2218x3943.thumb.jpg.d24f1e812d99409efb7bd19aeb88ae6e.jpg

 

Another hour and half but I started making stupid mistakes so I think that's me done for today unless I get the urge after tea.

 

That's looking a lot better than what i managed to achieve today in four and a half hours.

 

Love how vibrant that red color is. 

 

Your super neatness really shows on the clothing too. I wish i had that level of control. 

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11 minutes ago, The Eagle Lord said:

 

That's looking a lot better than what i managed to achieve today in four and a half hours.

 

Love how vibrant that red color is. 

 

Your super neatness really shows on the clothing too. I wish i had that level of control. 

 

In all honesty the degree at which I can paint is simply because I draw. I haven't painted many minis at all, but the fundamentals of painting in 3d aren't far removed from drawing and painting normally. I still can't 'keep within the lines' consistly.

 

It's also nothing on putting hundreds And hundreds of hours in like the talented bastards in this thread have, so don't be hard on yourself. It all comes with practice.

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37 minutes ago, moosegrinder said:

See that's what I thought but I found myself having to touch up again and again and again . I don't know if it's paint consistency, aforementioned cack handedness or just because my hands aren't particularly steady but it seems to take forever no matter what I do.

 

IMG_20190922_151724-2218x3943.thumb.jpg.d24f1e812d99409efb7bd19aeb88ae6e.jpg

 

Another hour and half but I started making stupid mistakes so I think that's me done for today unless I get the urge after tea.

I really want some cockles now!

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Really though I should be painting, not thinking about cockles. I’ve just checked my wet pallet, it stinks and has gone mouldy! Need to get my finger out, because I’m not to get any better by watching YouTube tutorials and looking at Instagram!

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38 minutes ago, MrEm said:

Really though I should be painting, not thinking about cockles. I’ve just checked my wet pallet, it stinks and has gone mouldy! Need to get my finger out, because I’m not to get any better by watching YouTube tutorials and looking at Instagram!

 

I just saw a tip on Facebook about putting a bit of isopropyl alcohol in with the water to prevent that.

 

With the mould, not being bone idle :p

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11 hours ago, moosegrinder said:

Another hour and half but I started making stupid mistakes 

 

Hands up who still makes stupid mistakes.

 

*hand shoots up into air*

 

Mine are usually preceded by "I wonder what would happen if...."

 

However, if you're concerned about keeping within th eline and want to pick up a bit of speed quickly, You may want to consider washes. 

 

If you don't know what it is (apologies of you do), it's basically getting a very thin, water-like consistency of paint and covering entire sections of the mini, or the mini as a whole. The thin consistency draws the majority of the pigment to the recesses, giving line-shading and also hiding a multitude of errors if you're not being too careful with your brushwork.

 

Washing is sometimes looked down on as a 'beginner' technique, but there's no such thing. It's just a tool, and a useful one.

 

Lots of companies make washes, but my personal favourite or Army Painter. A thinned down Soft Tone wash won't dull a paint job too much and really helps define a sculpt.

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You totally do have the skill to blend when it comes to control and should try it.

The main advice I would give is that it requires patience. Use lots of thin layers, thinner than you think they should be. Milk thin. Put a bit down, move to a different area until sure it is dry. Repeat! Over and over again. Move up through you highlight colours as you progress. 

And not too much watery paint on the brush, otherwise it might run into you recesses and need mopping up.

All just patience.

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I wouldn't bother with blending unless you are entering a competition. It's more important to focus on contrast and detail as these will make your models look more interesting to look at and have more impact on the table. 

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Yeah, also, you can create a hugely eye-catching model by just painting highlights on the areas that would be lighter. Think about where the light would be coming from and hitting. Or even better, physically point a light at the model in such a way the lights it as you want it to be lit, and take a photo of it. You can then use the photo as a reference for where to paint patches of highlight. 

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God it feels good to actually be able to paint something again. I think it's been around four months since I was able.

 

2fmSdPz.jpg

 

The model on the left was a rescue from a stripping experiment gone wrong. It mostly melted so has little definition left, so I'm painting it up as a unit which dressed up Cinco de Mayo style to hide the blobbiness.

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I've been thinking about doing a youtube series on painting a collection of models whether an army, box set or whatever. I probably won't since I'm lazy and need to earn money, but I have come up with at least one piece of advice. If there is any aspect of painting that's preventing you from finishing your models, change the way you paint. So if the prospect of spending 60 minutes doing lots of thin layers just to basecoat the model is off putting, use one or two thick layers or don't do a solid basecoat at all. There are other methods and styles out there and if you are prepared to be a little more creative you might find a more enjoyable way to paint. 

 

Some practical advice for basecoating:

 

- shake your paints! a properly mixed paint is vital for maximum coverage.

- don't thin your paints (too much). I like my paints to have a paste like consistency and have never had a problem with "obscuring the details".

- use a big ol' brush. A big brush loaded with thick paint will make short work of even the biggest mini (just don't use a brand new expensive kolinsky sable).

- choose you paints wisely. Paints vary in opacity, it's just the nature of the pigments, so sometimes it's better to choose a less ideal color that offers better coverage. 

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Advice requested on the above picture - how would you go about highlighting the red cloth? I started with VMC Hull Red, worked up to GW Khorne red, then VGC Bloody Red, then added some Sunny Skin tone in that, but swear I haen't made a dent in the base colour.

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@moosegrinder How's your bracing and painting position? i reckon somewhere near 90% of painting issues can be improved by better positioning and bracing.

 

I have my chair at a height where i can brace my elbows on my chair arms, my wrists against the table edge and my little and 3rd finger braced against my other hand at all times.  so the only movement i ever have is my thumb, index and midle finger. everything else is rock-solid. getting your arms braced togeher is the biggest improvement you can make

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@Mikes you need more shading so I would work on that first. 

 

From what I remember bloody red, like most reds, is quite transparent and needs a lot of layers. There are a couple of tricks to speed up the process. The first is to add red ink to the paint to boost the color intensity. The second is to paint the highlighted area with sunny skin tone and then paint red over that.

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On 25/09/2019 at 11:03, Nicky said:

@moosegrinder How's your bracing and painting position? i reckon somewhere near 90% of painting issues can be improved by better positioning and bracing.

 

I have my chair at a height where i can brace my elbows on my chair arms, my wrists against the table edge and my little and 3rd finger braced against my other hand at all times.  so the only movement i ever have is my thumb, index and midle finger. everything else is rock-solid. getting your arms braced togeher is the biggest improvement you can make

 

This is something I've struggled with. I tend to brace however I can against whatever I can (I have a green tray thing to hold all my gumf that had a lip I brace against) and I've seen people who do the heels of their hands together thing but that's not comfy. I'll find a way that works eventually.

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