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That's a cool figure. Look forward to seeing that one done.

 

I can't seem to finish anything. I think my issue is that while I'm now quite good at washes and stuff that darkens a model down, I'm a bit scared of doing anything that brightens the model up, i.e. highlights, and in particular edge highlighting, and doing any brighter layering. It always seems like too big a jump, so I feel like immediately I've made the model look messy, and also I'm just very clumsy with it.

 

Not dry-brushing though. I can do that all day. It's magic.

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1 hour ago, Davros sock drawer said:

That's a cool figure. Look forward to seeing that one done.

 

I can't seem to finish anything. I think my issue is that while I'm now quite good at washes and stuff that darkens a model down, I'm a bit scared of doing anything that brightens the model up, i.e. highlights, and in particular edge highlighting, and doing any brighter layering. It always seems like too big a jump, so I feel like immediately I've made the model look messy, and also I'm just very clumsy with it.

 

Not dry-brushing though. I can do that all day. It's magic.

 

I find that too especially with flatter surfaces, because I can't really do blending. As a result I never push my highlights very bright unless it's an edge or a very small area.

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2 hours ago, Davros sock drawer said:

That's a cool figure. Look forward to seeing that one done.

 

I can't seem to finish anything. I think my issue is that while I'm now quite good at washes and stuff that darkens a model down, I'm a bit scared of doing anything that brightens the model up, i.e. highlights, and in particular edge highlighting, and doing any brighter layering. It always seems like too big a jump, so I feel like immediately I've made the model look messy, and also I'm just very clumsy with it.

 

Not dry-brushing though. I can do that all day. It's magic.

if you're referring to the stormcast, that'll be because after a wash over the gold, you're dealing with two very distinct things. paint colour AND reflectivity/shine. Like youve noted, when you go back over with the original to clean up / reinforce the main colour it'll look really bright, but outside of a worklight or at angle it will look good. it's not like red base, wash with agrax, paint red again, because the red is just colour, not reflective particles that were dulled with the wash. But this is a powerful and good thing to know and take advantage of

 

When painting metals always consider how armour in battle would look. it'd have a general tone and colour (actually mostly controlled by the environment and lighting, but take this out of the mix at present) maybe they've been fighting for weeks and their gleaming armour is dulled somewhat with sweat, oils, dust dried blood etc. any scrapes against rocks, dings from arrows blows from weapons etc would reveal gleaming bright metal underneath.  so when you want to highlight up metal on armour or weapons, take this into account and use it for your advantage adding small nicks and scratches with your original colour to the armour rather than boringly edge highlighting everything. if you must edge highlight then use a broken "dance across the edge" technique to simulate blows from weapons etc, you dont need to line every panel, just where the light would hit and glint.

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2 hours ago, Davros sock drawer said:

That's a cool figure. Look forward to seeing that one done.

 

I can't seem to finish anything. I think my issue is that while I'm now quite good at washes and stuff that darkens a model down, I'm a bit scared of doing anything that brightens the model up, i.e. highlights, and in particular edge highlighting, and doing any brighter layering. It always seems like too big a jump, so I feel like immediately I've made the model look messy, and also I'm just very clumsy with it.

 

Not dry-brushing though. I can do that all day. It's magic.

 

This video allowed me to understand how to blend effectively. 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Nicky said:

if you're referring to the stormcast, that'll be because after a wash over the gold, you're dealing with two very distinct things. paint colour AND reflectivity/shine. Like youve noted, when you go back over with the original to clean up / reinforce the main colour it'll look really bright, but outside of a worklight or at angle it will look good. it's not like red base, wash with agrax, paint red again, because the red is just colour, not reflective particles that were dulled with the wash. But this is a powerful and good thing to know and take advantage of

 

When painting metals always consider how armour in battle would look. it'd have a general tone and colour (actually mostly controlled by the environment and lighting, but take this out of the mix at present) maybe they've been fighting for weeks and their gleaming armour is dulled somewhat with sweat, oils, dust dried blood etc. any scrapes against rocks, dings from arrows blows from weapons etc would reveal gleaming bright metal underneath.  so when you want to highlight up metal on armour or weapons, take this into account and use it for your advantage adding small nicks and scratches with your original colour to the armour rather than boringly edge highlighting everything. if you must edge highlight then use a broken "dance across the edge" technique to simulate blows from weapons etc, you dont need to line every panel, just where the light would hit and glint.


Actually it’s not the armour that concerns me (although now that you’ve described what to me sounds like another very advanced approach, I fear my attempts to dry brush and edge highlight won’t look that good) - it’s more things like the blue cloaks and shoulder pauldrons. 


It’s like - this already looks ok to me.


23A31169-D157-45A6-BDAB-AAF84221F69E.thumb.jpeg.b2e5ed64775fb5fb7f1f78dc226b7127.jpeg

 

But it’s just plain Kantor Blue with a dark blue wash. No highlights or brighter layers yet. But as soon as I start trying to lighten anything like this up, it starts to look fake and messy, even though I can see (from the reflections in this pic) exactly where the lighter parts should go.

 

Maybe it’s just a case of getting used to where the light bits should stop and start, and how gradually I should brighten each pass?

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so kantor blue

wash

kantor blue back on the raised areas.

mix a little white into the blue for the more savage folds,

mix a little more into it and do the tips etc

if your steps are just too severe you can glaze over with your blue wash.

 

interesting tip, look at how some of the pro painters deal with cloaks - highlighting not with flat slabs of colour, but painting in fine "cross hatches" over the areas to be highlighted.

 

BUT

don't feel you need to work on what you feel is good. There are am illion ways to paint.  What's more - don't ever aim for perfection or what you're expected to believe what perfection is. there's nothing wrong with brushstrokes, with texture etc. perfectly smooth blends are massively overrated and pointless on 28mm figures. When you're painting, put the model down on the table and look at it from a 2 foot distance.  Everything looks worse magnified, but at display distance what you think might look iffy, can look great as your eyes pick out the contrast and gloss over that area you spent 2 hours trying to look smooth and nice.

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42 minutes ago, Nicky said:

so kantor blue

wash

kantor blue back on the raised areas.

 

 

I should have said, this is where I'm up to. It's really where and how brightly to paint the next two steps that I'm not feeling confident about - but only one way to find out I guess! I mean, I did ok with my Malifaux guy, but I got the highlights far too bright initially.

 

Must finish that one too!

 

Thanks for the tips. I do think that some of what you describe would be running before I can walk, but I'll certainly have a go at all of it. I feel like I'm at the "practicing" stage atm

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@Davros sock drawer

I Was always worried about going too far on my highlights and as a result didn’t go far enough and ended up with a bunch of models that when varnished looks bit dull. 
push them contrasts. What’s the worst that will happen? 

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1 hour ago, moosegrinder said:

You have to strip it and start again which, to be perfectly honest, is quite cathartic and pleasing once you know you can paint it better next time.

Or just ignore it and move on to another of the hundreds of models in the pile of shame!

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Seriously though. This is supposed to be fun. If you’re learning just experiment and have fun with it and don’t worry about the outcome. 
The way I see it is models are cheap. Your time isn’t. 

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I’m probably coming across more worried than I really am - I think I’m just putting it off because I’ve got most of these models looking pretty sweet and I’m reluctant to make them worse, but you can always repaint. I am having a lot of fun. 

 

I tried to freehand a thin blue line on a white cloak the other day and it went hilariously badly. Just...how?! Surely people don’t mask off tiny sections? But how else is this even possible?

 

6B32C18D-F1A5-42FF-BC06-D7FE4E4DD948.thumb.jpeg.7bddaf6b0e5742d9009e7c94613bd7c0.jpeg


But I just repainted it white so no big deal. 

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practice and pulling towards you so the bristles follow the direction of your hand. i never thought i could do that when i was new in to painting but reckon i could do it quite comfortably now

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On 21/10/2020 at 08:57, Davros sock drawer said:

I’m probably coming across more worried than I really am - I think I’m just putting it off because I’ve got most of these models looking pretty sweet and I’m reluctant to make them worse, but you can always repaint. I am having a lot of fun. 

 

I tried to freehand a thin blue line on a white cloak the other day and it went hilariously badly. Just...how?! Surely people don’t mask off tiny sections? But how else is this even possible?

 

 

Tried oil paint? Ridiculously easy to tidy up with a bit of mineral spirits on a thin brush.

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42 minutes ago, idiwa said:

@Davros sock drawer loving the demon with the cage. Excellent work.


Thank you! I can see where I could have done better, but towards the end I was just loving having a chilled think about where to put the skulls and not really caring about doing it “right”.
 

I think maybe I’ve been watching too many YouTube videos and not using my artistic instincts to do what I think would look cool. I currently have a vast pile of models at 80% completion, all painted to “regulation” GW colour schemes, but I also have lots of un-painted ones with which I think I might try and be a bit more imaginative.

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On 22/10/2020 at 11:02, Davros sock drawer said:

I tried to paint a green glow on the lowest dagger there, and a bit on the face of the nearest spirit, as it should be lit up by the glowing Skelebob. I quite like it, what do you reckon?

 

It's a nice effect and overall the model is well painted. Having a light source on the bottom of the model is tricky to pull off because you have the highest contrast on the base between the dull brown and saturated green which draws attention.  You could add some colour around the faces and, to a lesser degree, the hands of the spirits to help make them the focal point as well as adding to the legibility of the model.  I'd also recommend ageing the swords with a brown wash or a few spots of orange to add to the character.

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7 hours ago, Cocky said:

 

It's a nice effect and overall the model is well painted. Having a light source on the bottom of the model is tricky to pull off because you have the highest contrast on the base between the dull brown and saturated green which draws attention.  You could add some colour around the faces and, to a lesser degree, the hands of the spirits to help make them the focal point as well as adding to the legibility of the model.  I'd also recommend ageing the swords with a brown wash or a few spots of orange to add to the character.


I will try exactly that, thanks Cocky. Those swords are rather clean.

 

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Using fluorescent pigments to pick out the details & edges on the sword, waiting for yellow to turn up to complete the effect.  Surprisingly hard to take photos of.

 

BC375A5C-0CFF-4307-99BD-AA3F39CFE1EC.thumb.jpeg.ad32b57e29ba3febc10192ca50240e32.jpeg

 

Working on the Lion today, not completely going to plan but progress is happening.  The change in scale is messing with me a bit.

 

67B70C52-48BE-4744-82CA-EF32A22136B4.thumb.jpeg.38a27738bd74f30175218565442c02ab.jpeg

 

BC0E0F77-3083-4DD9-BF47-9D47BDA2C8CE.thumb.jpeg.c353e6ba039acea62ceb1cfe8de3166a.jpeg

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