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I played Nanty Narking the other week - it’s not quite as thematic feeling as Ankh Morpork but the minis are nice and the addition of role cards for the pieces that give specific powers are a nice addition to differentiate it a bit but I think I prefer the original - mainly as I’m a massive fan of the books. 
 It’s a game that works best at 3-4 though. 

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14 hours ago, jonnyalpha said:

Wasn't Nanty Narkin the Discworld remake? I can't imagine that would work for your normal solo gaming. I look forward to your write ups, they're always interesting. 

 

13 hours ago, Mortis said:

I played Nanty Narking the other week - it’s not quite as thematic feeling as Ankh Morpork but the minis are nice and the addition of role cards for the pieces that give specific powers are a nice addition to differentiate it a bit but I think I prefer the original - mainly as I’m a massive fan of the books. 
 It’s a game that works best at 3-4 though. 

 

Yes, it is the remake.  And yes the marked asymmetry makes it unsuitable for solo play (apart from one scenario pictured below where you play a straight forward 3 way control game with 3 of the characters).  I backed the KS last summer at a time when I wasn't paying enough attention to mechanics, so it's just one of those things, and its currently up on eBay.  

The miniatures are really nice though - and with none of that feeling of "missing out" by not painting them either.  

It's a decent game all round, just not for me.

 

 

IMG_1533.JPG

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Pandemic Legacy Season 1 : October

 

Early October was a disaster. We drew alot of CoDa to start with and then Epidemiced on player turn 1.

 

 

The new search this time was really hard. So few bonus to searching as City Zero didn't have a military base

 

Late October went a lot better. 

 

 

We tooled up with some binoculars and got far more of the needed cards drawn. We also took the Ops specialist to build a military base in City Zero having ignored him since the betrayal/reveal.

 


Patient Zero was found....and that completed all overarching objectives! We opened Box 7 and the game changed again. Changing mid game always leaves you to struggle to catch up - especially when objectives change so much. We got here in the first month it was possible, and it feels like we can really control the game now for Nov/Dec (I'm a little worried they might become too easy if we vaccinate loads?)

 

We've now unlocked all the dossiers/rulebooks...only the deck will change things. And we can start the fight back against CoDa. Luckily we brought the Ops specialist as we quickly built up vaccine factories (and made 2 starting ones at game end) AND started immunizing cities...and took a gentle route to a win. We've also started sacrificing people to skip some nasty Infect stages.

 

 

Having seen (we think) all the games major tricks now I remain incredibly impressed with the package. It's really evolved over time and the feeling of a "persistent" world that effects future games is really strong.

Had another issue that the Box was meant to contain (being vague) parts A and B - but we have 2 As. Was easy to work out what B should have been, and look up how many - but a little annoying

 

Rule question (Spoiler for October completed/Box 7 open) if anyone knows/remembers

 

 

Coda is Black for us.

 

 


If we vaccinate a black city, no faded are placed there if we need to infect it. (And faded can't outbreak in from adjacent cities, other disease colors can )

 

If we have a faded city (say red) that we vaccinate - does it produce a) nothing or b) red cubes now if drawn from the infection deck?

 

 

 

Loving this...shame I'm told Season 2 isn't as good

 

Concordia

 

Fairly standard, solid Euro game. But we played 2v2 which was really good and not something I'd seen before. The lack of communication should be enforced - and that the impact of each team member doing what the active player chooses elevated a good euro game to a very good afternoon of fun.

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22 hours ago, Cosmic_Guru said:

I'm going to post about Vindication next week - advance warning - extreme gush is likely.  A game hasn't grabbed me like this one for ages. 

 

I saw this in Static this afternoon and it looks intriguing; c'mon, share the gush now....

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On 28/10/2019 at 16:32, Glasgowchivas said:

 

I saw this in Static this afternoon and it looks intriguing; c'mon, share the gush now....

 

Ha!  No, always dangerous to post in full-on gush mode.  I'm glad I didn't because after perusing some of the threads on BGG yesterday, and re-reading the instructions I realised I slightly misinterpreted one rule and didn't fully appreciate the significance of another, so my thoughts on this have changed a little.  It's still an interesting, chewy and rewarding game though, so here goes.

 

Vindication

 

You play as a wretched soul washed up on the shores of an island - your starting self is extremely limited, but you have bags of influence and just as much potential.  You gradually explore the island, visiting various locations which enables you to convert your influence into simple attributes (strength, inspiration, and knowledge), and thence to obtain more complex ones, and also to enlarge your influence pool by converting potential into influence.  Finally (as a player of games) you seek ways to convert all these activities into VPs - that can be by fighting monsters, obtaining and using relics or traits, controlling locations or by other means.  Usually this all makes reasonable  "sense" e.g you visit a library to obtain knowledge, train at a fort to gain strength, and visit the proverbial arcane tower to pick up a relic.  To their credit, the designers have included a nicely illustrated booklet which fleshes the world out, and which helps to prevents the setting becoming a mere skin covering an engine (combine primary colours to form secondary ones, shift cubes from one pot to another).

 

As to how this is all represented mechanically, it's fairly simple .  Everyone picks a colour to play and takes 21 cubes of that colour and associated aids.  These colours have no significance. The cubes are initially allocated as to 8 in potential (useless until activated), 8 in influence (think action points), 2 in conviction (think power) and 1 each in the simple attributes - you place one each in the yellow, blue and red sections of the board.

 

What is significant is your journey card - this determines both your starting position and your starting companion type.  Say you have a yellow colour companion, each turn you will be able to spend one influence to activate that companion and thereby obtain 2 inspiration (by moving 2 of your influence cubes into the yellow section).  The kicker is that each companion also has an individual ability which you will seek to leverage if possible.  You also choose 1 of 2 secret quest cards and this will also have a bearing on your strategy.  Then  hex tiles are drawn out of a bag and placed to either side of each player's starting position so that in a 4 or 5 player game most of the outer hexagon might be filled in.  To start with you are encouraged to stick to the basic 19 tile set which is simple and includes duplicates of most locations (see first photograph).  Later you can mix things up with various alternative "bells and whistles" hexes which make the game a little harder and which add some fun novelties.  Doing this ratchets up the randomness of tile placement - you may initially only move 2 spaces so it may be a while before a particular unique hex you want comes out, and you may need to mix things up a bit until then.  Finally in the set up, 2 end game triggers are drawn from a set of 12.  

 

Each turn you must move at least one space, you may activate one companion or yourself and you may either visit any location hex or rest (move one cube forward).  There are also a number of free actions available such as blending primary attribute cubes into secondary ones, taking control of a hex and reclaiming surplus influence cubes from the board or companion cards (you lose the VPs gained when you acquired that companion, but that is trivial).

 

At first I thought this was a straight forward engine builder - it reminded me of Terra Mystica - but now I think that although there is that element, the fact you may always "reverse" the engine to replace influence from unwanted surpluses on the board or on companion cards makes the analogy weaker.  It should not really be an issue to have sufficient influence available even without converting all your potential.   The game also reminds me a little of Archmage in the way colours blend - the primary colours are blended to create orange, green and purple and everything is logical in that respect (not sure how this might impact accessibility re colour blindness).   There are also area control and set collection aspects because spending a cube of conviction gives you control over a hex and earns you points if other players visit, and because there are various attribute masteries to be gained (represented by the large coloured tiles in the second photos), depending on who has the highest number of cards in each colour.

 

The thing which really delights me was how each game plays differently.  This is a cliché, and also a truism at some level of course, but in this case one really has to think on the fly and change one's approach to reflect how the board develops and which cards are available (you may always select the visible card, take a chance on the top card of the pile or pay a cube of conviction to select 1 of 3 at the top of the deck (very useful indeed)). There are 16-20 cards of each deck so one doesn't burn through them all in a single game.   Another fly in the ointment is that reaching certain points on the score board (represented by metal coins in the photos) results in a fresh end game trigger coming into play - so all one's best plans might come to naught.   It's fair to say these features aren't universally appreciated.  The games I've played have been different although I've also been mixing in new elements along the way to complicate matters.

 

Is anything OP? Efficiently gaining multiple relics or enemy scalps will probably result in high scores, particularly if you use the power draw to select those which are most useful, but this may not always be easy to achieve.  For example if I want to fight monsters I need sources of strength and inspiration (red plus yellow respectively which I may always blend to create orange i.e courage), but my starting companion might give me knowledge (blue) and the hexes I need to recruit a red or yellow companion from an inn or to obtain red or yellow directly from a fort or a holy spire respectively might not emerge quickly.  

 

As you can hopefully see from the photos, you position your marker in the triangles between hexes and move along these - a really neat idea.  You can't occupy the same space as another player but up to 5 players may visit any 1 hex.  Other than this, player interaction is limited to the toll exacted via hex ownership, but there is an optional "treachery" deck which may be mixed in to create some back stabbery if desired.   Each turn you have to move although this usually doesn't preclude spamming a single hex if that is what you want to do.

 

Generally component quality is high and each of the player kits is fitted into its own small tray which makes set up quick. However, there are some complete howlers - like a cloth bag which is simply too small to both hold the hexes and to be able to shuffle them around a bit (the hexes are double sided so you can't just put them on the table face down).  

 

Then there are the miniatures.  Yes, there are miniatures, which I haven't mentioned at all.  That's because they are completely unnecessary.  There is a great big 1st player marker (seen on purple's player board in the second photo), and then there are the monuments.   One of the game variants is called "guilds and monuments".  In this you can dedicate attributes and conviction to - surprise! -  construct a monument, which when completed gives you 15 Vps and a possession of a large miniature.  In the second game pictured green didn't have a good time but amused themselves with constructing a giant tree thing (not pictured).  A true KS game I suppose.

 

(There is  a game mode I haven't yet experienced which involves a boss fight in the centre of the board. ) 

 

Of course, playing solo (3H so far although tempted to try a full on 5H) I'm not looking at this from the same perspective as many.  I'm indifferent to who wins, I don't even care particularly if the game is tight.  I really like randomness, and this certainly hits that particular mark.  Some companions grant more useful abilities, some hex layouts will facilitate certain strategies more easily, some relics or traits will be more or less useful (hence the attraction of the power draw).  The design works really well, and in general production quality is high.   I love the way new game ending triggers emerge pretty quickly, and how you have to keep thinking on your feet.    Games seem to take 60-90 minutes.

 

The photos represent

1.  Base game board, probably at the conclusion of my first game.  The board is double sided and this side is for beginners - it explains what goes where.  You can see there are duplicates of some tiles - in this game both forts are adjacent, and 2 of the 3 inns are also adjacent.

 

2. Advanced game board at conclusion of most recent game but before end game scoring.  I've just set the cards out to be oriented my way rather than all facing outward.  In this game not all the location hexes were even drawn.  In this game also I've mixed in the optional tiles from various small expansions - a pet store, crystal mines, teleport stones etc - so the only duplicate hex is the inn (this the only way to add companions so it is pretty important). The end game trigger which came into play was the one drawn most recently - see pile to the left - and was related to proficiencies in place before the card was drawn (proficiencies are the smaller coloured rectangles which are easy to acquire by spending 3 cubes of that attribute).  After final scoring, grey won this one comfortably from dominating in 3 attributes, killing several monsters and what not.  Purple was trying to go down the relics route (one of the original game ending triggers) but on this occasion it didn't work.  Green built a giant plastic tree and finished last.  Green also sacked their only companion (to reclaim the influence cubes) so that wasn't great either (not that sacking companions is necessarily bad - some give you on joining bonuses and nothing further so there is no point in keeping them if you need the influence back).  None of the 3 players reached "vindicated" status which would have required converting all potential into influence, and which is represented by flipping the player card onto a predominantly white side.  This action seems curiously underpowered to me in the context of the game setting and how significant it should be as major life event  - you simply gain 5 VPs as a one off benefit, and then 2 attributes instead of 1 if you choose to activate yourself rather than a companion.  Gee whiz!  It isn't trivial to convert 8 potential into influence, and that's the best you can offer as a reward!

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Cosmic_Guru
Tidying up, minor amendments
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Played Scythe at the weekend, which is probably old hat to everyone here, but I enjoyed it. Particularly impressed by the way it managed to make individual turns fast whilst still being a long game.

 

That said there was a part of me that resented being tricked into playing a worker placement Eurogame by the promise of the mech miniatures and the aesthetic/setting.

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I don't mind admitting that I fully love the dice rolling, confrontational, cut throat, overly complex, over long, thematic board game (what people used to disparagingly refer to as Ameritrash) - I love, love rolling with the punches, letting the dice fall where they may, and utterly, mercilessly back stabbing people until they vow to never play the game against me again.

 

Unfortunately the people I tend to play with these days are very, very much of the opposite mindset! They love games that are about maximising efficiency, limited levels of chance, and minimal opportunities to interact with your opponents. Fun in their own way I suppose but *sigh*.

 

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Managed to play a pretty-much full rules game of Takenoko with my 7 year old daughter last night, which feels like a bit of a milestone. Cut the objective target down from 9 to 6 though, and played very nicely in terms of not being a dick with the panda/plot laying and disrupting her plans.

 

I've never hugely got on with this game. I've always felt it had been rushed through playtesting due to the obvious marketability of the theme, and even the official and semi official sources are full of suggested tweaks and variants to make the game actually work properly. I only really still own it because my wife and daughter both love all the pieces and presentation.

 

My main misgiving was that the panda was way too dominant in 2P games, but it turns out there's a suggested rule tweak (yes, another) in the expansion rules (but applicable to the base game) which solves this: players score an extra 3 points for each set of different objectives they have, e.g. 1 x Gardener, 1 x Panda and 1 x Plot. Combined with the fact that Panda objectives have a lower score anyway, this changes the balance of scoring enough that a player rushing panda objectives and forcing the game to end can still get beaten by someone going for a diverse strategy.

 

This works better for me than the other suggested tweaks, like having players discard any objectives they draw that are already completed (not something that really works in a game where objectives are hidden!). There's another suggested tweak in the expansion that the panda can't eat bamboo bases, only upper shoots, but I think one change is better than two, here.

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Just stuck some cash down on the Square Off Neo Chess board on Kickstarter.  Been looking for a decent chess computer for ages and then this popped up on Facebook, they've a history of doing a much more expensive unit before but this is more on the low end of the market. At £100 seemed worth a punt and they have form so not going to get ripped off!

 

Link

 

 

Being able to use it with Chess.com means you won't ever go short for players and the app for improving your game sounds amazing. I don't have anyone to play board games with so stuff like this is the next best thing!

 

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There's been a full-on resurgence of board gaming in the Wind household over the past few months.  I've been playing Night Vault, X-Wing, Epic Card Game, Memoir '44 and Battle Lore 2nd Ed. with my gaming chum of a Sunday afternoon. 

 

And solo wise, I've finally taught myself Star Wars Imperial Assault with the aid of the companion app and the Space Hulk Death Angel Card Game.  Have also borrowed One Deck Dungeon and bought the Mars Attacks Miniatures Game, so I have those on the pile of shame!  I'd like to pick up a few more decent solo adventure games so I'm thinking Descent, one of the Zombicides and one of the D&D adventure system games will be on the cards.

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Continuing my adventures into board gaming, I took the plunge and bought Star Wars Rebellion last weekend. I was off today so set it up at home and had a little play through a couple of rounds on my own to try and get a feel for it - it looks like it could be a lot of fun if I can convince my (admittedly Star Wars loving) girlfriend to sit down and play it with me.

 

Only slight problem - the board fills our entire table. Literally no space for the player mats and all the other little things as well as the board. We're housesitting for my parents this coming weekend and they have a much bigger table, so we can at least try our first game or two there, but after that, I guess future games have to be on the floor. Our flat right now is a pre-furnished rental property, so it's not even like we can just get a bigger table.

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I've just begun The Rise Of Fenris campaign for Scythe. Quite exciting to have seven more games booked, and staying with the one faction (aside of any tweaks the game throws at us).  The single use "perks" look a fun addition, and the vote for how the world changes at the end of the first game didn't go as I'd hoped.

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8 minutes ago, uglifruit said:

I've just begun The Rise Of Fenris campaign for Scythe. Quite exciting to have seven more games booked, and staying with the one faction (aside of any tweaks the game throws at us).  The single use "perks" look a fun addition, and the vote for how the world changes at the end of the first game didn't go as I'd hoped.

I really need to get that. I love Scythe and it's the only expansion I'm still missing.

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It's early days, but the backstory was fun, and the "win conditions" for game two have been modified by game one, so we're looking forward to that.  I'll not spoil anything here.

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3 hours ago, Cosmic_Guru said:

Or Sword & Sorcery?  Much better (more sophisticated) than the D&D games imo.

That does indeed look relevant to my interests but it would be as well as, rather than instead of. I absolutely adore Ravenloft so I’m keen to grab one of the newer ones. It’s a great little streamlined system, IMO.

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23 hours ago, ChewMagma said:

I don't mind admitting that I fully love the dice rolling, confrontational, cut throat, overly complex, over long, thematic board game (what people used to disparagingly refer to as Ameritrash) - I love, love rolling with the punches, letting the dice fall where they may, and utterly, mercilessly back stabbing people until they vow to never play the game against me again.

 

 

 

This is what I'm all about. What do you think are some good games that fit this description? We love Spartacus plenty of back stabbing and excitement when you get a good gladiator fight. Looking at Dune next which sounds promising.

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7 hours ago, Kzo said:

 

This is what I'm all about. What do you think are some good games that fit this description? We love Spartacus plenty of back stabbing and excitement when you get a good gladiator fight. Looking at Dune next which sounds promising.

 

Alas rarely get anything decent to table these days, although I can always tempt people into the Game of Thrones board game still. Highly recommended.

 

Risk Legacy almost broke the group :-/

 

At uni a decade+ ago I had a great D&D group who used to wind down (!) after 6 hour roleplaying sessions with this sort of stuff, halcyon days but we all live all over now: mammoth Munchkin sessions, Shogun, Axis & Allies, RoboRally, Battlestar Galactica, Arkham Horror, Mansions of Madness, Citadels, long Blood Bowl and Necromunda campaigns, very competitive Settlers (the only Euro we would tolerate), even classics like Junta. I'm sure it is all terribly dated and unfashionable now.

 

The one game I've always wanted to play in this vein is Cosmic Encounter but never had the opportunity unfortunately.

 

The key thing I love about these games is it is normally clear from the board situation who is winning at any given time so players can actually compete. A lot of board games now, you all do your solitaire puzzle thing and then at the end of the game, tot up the scores using some arcane methodology to determine who has won - a total anti-climax.

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13 hours ago, ChewMagma said:

 

Alas rarely get anything decent to table these days, although I can always tempt people into the Game of Thrones board game still. Highly recommended.

 

Risk Legacy almost broke the group :-/

 

At uni a decade+ ago I had a great D&D group who used to wind down (!) after 6 hour roleplaying sessions with this sort of stuff, halcyon days but we all live all over now: mammoth Munchkin sessions, Shogun, Axis & Allies, RoboRally, Battlestar Galactica, Arkham Horror, Mansions of Madness, Citadels, long Blood Bowl and Necromunda campaigns, very competitive Settlers (the only Euro we would tolerate), even classics like Junta. I'm sure it is all terribly dated and unfashionable now.

 

The one game I've always wanted to play in this vein is Cosmic Encounter but never had the opportunity unfortunately.

 

The key thing I love about these games is it is normally clear from the board situation who is winning at any given time so players can actually compete. A lot of board games now, you all do your solitaire puzzle thing and then at the end of the game, tot up the scores using some arcane methodology to determine who has won - a total anti-climax.

 

We have GoT, I really enjoy it but it's not as popular with my mates unfortunately. I've had Risk Legacy sitting on the shelf for a while now, we love Risk 2210 and I know this would go down a bomb but there are 7 of us, 5 of whom are doctors who work various shifts week to week so it's really difficult to keep a consistent group for a campaign style game like that. One day we will manage it!

 

Cosmic Encounter looks great too, would like to get that one day.

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Enjoying Combo Fighter for a quick gaming fix with my daughter. Unfortunately I win rather a lot, as she is disadvantaged by not having been alive to play a ton of Tekken & Soul Calibur in the 90s & 00s :blah:

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Jaws
 

I really liked that  - the theme helped but it’s a compact yet meaty package with plenty of game to it for £20

 

The first act is stronger I think and whomever goes into Act 2 in the stronger position has a real advantage but it’s still really fun.

 

The biggest issue is that after Act 1 you have a new game type and rules to explain. Given we started at 8pm it was a bit late to do that but that’s just us and well not have problem in future.

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Marvel Champions

 

Didn't love this in either my practice solo play (2 handed) or 3 player actual game.

 

It's mechanically pretty solid, but it's...bland. It does somethings well - and the use of others abilities and the Defend options means there's less down time when it's not your turn.

 

Of your 40-50 card deck 15 are specific to your hero. 10(ish) are from a standard set everyone shares (and in the core set all 5 heros have the same ones). The remaining 10-15 are from an aspect (Protection/Agression etc) that you pick when you deck build (any hero can be any aspect, and then you pick from all available cards in that aspect to make your deck)

 

15/40 is pretty hard to make your hero "feel" like their identidy. The cards there are quite thematic, but they're the minority of your deck. And when you see other people playing the same standard cards (e.g. Hellicarrier) everything begins to feel a bit homogenous. The aspects help differentiate from each other but I'm not sure an Agression Spiderman would feel that much different from an Agression She-Hulk.

 

Which is a shame because I think the actual mechanics are solid, but it's theme feels missing. While expansion packs will add more standard/aspect cards so you'll see more variety (and synergy) I'm not sure it'll ever get past that 15/40+ issue to help the fantasy of playing a specific hero. It mostly made me want to dig out Sentinals where every hero deck is unique throughout for that hero and tied to their powers/abilities.

 

 

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I know it's difficult to talk about, without spoiling things, but I'm currently half way through the Rise Of Fenris campaign for Scythe.  So far the tweaks to each game goal, and the rewards/perks have been really fun, and the narrative - whilst not amazing - has at least been engaging enough to remind us why the changes have happened from game to game.

 

Overall rather good fun, and I'm feeling rather attached to my tricked out Saxony faction that I'm playing as.

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1 hour ago, uglifruit said:

I know it's difficult to talk about, without spoiling things, but I'm currently half way through the Rise Of Fenris campaign for Scythe.  So far the tweaks to each game goal, and the rewards/perks have been really fun, and the narrative - whilst not amazing - has at least been engaging enough to remind us why the changes have happened from game to game.

 

Overall rather good fun, and I'm feeling rather attached to my tricked out Saxony faction that I'm playing as.

 

I'm sure I will pick this up sooner or later - a good reason to return to Scythe (which I actually get out from time to time just to look at the artwork).

 

Updates on two Kickstarter games for now.

 

Rurik: Dawn of Kiev.  A lightweight area control game set in Kievan Rus in 1015 on the death of Vladimir the Great whereupon there was a bloody struggle for succession.  This translates into you taking over as one of the contestants for the throne, each of whom naturally have an individual power.  Then it's a case of deploying troops, taxing resources, building structures and fighting opponents (using a very simple system) over 4 rounds.  Pretty standard stuff but there is a nice power / speed (or initiative) conundrum at work - your action placement meeples are numbered and the lower numbered ones will act first but will be bumped down to a less useful space by a higher ranked one of your opponents.   Brilliantly, you may add coins as a bribe to get the best of both worlds with a low numbered meeple. There is also a bonus action which is a bit of a lottery but can give you additional actions, as can converting your resources in the end game - 4 rounds is pretty tight and there will always be more things you want to achieve but can't.  The game includes some detailed protagonist miniatures but these increase the cost - it's hard to recommend this game at this price point (£70 on BGG).    It's a keeper for me however because of the rock solid solo mode - this becomes a very tight 2P skirmish over the central 8 areas at different difficulty levels.  In the picture below there is an error since the outer dark brown areas shouldn't have been used in a 3P game, but you can see the numbered meeples in play.

 

Unbroken.  This is a solo rogue like experience with an infamous KS history.  Putting all that to one side for a moment, it's actually rather good.  The idea is that you are the lone survivor of an expedition far underground and have to battle your way back to the surface by facing and defeating 4 monsters of increasing difficulty.  There are 4 classes to choose from, all of whom have skills which may be used a limited number of times based on level - rogue, mage, hunter and warrior.  You have a certain amount of time before the monsters will appear, and you have to use this time wisely to prepare as best you can - to obtain food, to upgrade a weapon and to do a bit of scouting to see what you are up against (very important indeed for the L3 & 4 monsters).    If time runs out and you are still faffing around you get ambushed, which is not good.  Most of the gameplay during this travel phase comprises drawing 2 encounter cards (from a deck of around 100) and choosing one to action.  Each encounter takes a certain time and involves the exchange of resources.  Ah, resources.  The key concept in this game is "effort".  This is an efficient single measure of life force which is often split over health, stamina, action points and so forth.  You use it for lots of things, may concentrate it and convert it into cunning, recover it by resting, and lose it in combat when injured.   Ideally you will have improved your position and have a good level of effort before fighting each monster, but there is a lot of luck involved and trying to figure out how to make the best of things (this is where the scouting comes into pay - it enables you to see what will be required to win the next combat).  The combat is simple and based on a d6 menu of effects for the enemy and a choice of actions for you based on your equipped melee weapon.  A nice (well unpleasant really) feature is that many enemies give you de-buff conditions for the following level.  For each level there are 6 possible monsters, which I think gives 1,296 combinations.  Lots anyway.  Beating each monster results in gaining a skill and various loot - alternatively you may stealth past L1-3 and not obtain these benefits.  In the photo the Huntress has just beaten the troll boss pretty comfortably using her maul and with the extremely handy impale skill (the troll had a disarm action). 4 food in hand as well so all is well (you need to eat after each battle).  None of the Huntress's skills are useful in a combat context but the warrior for example has an enemy re-roll option.  

 

 

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It turned out that with some very careful placement of things and using spare chairs as side tables, we can just about fit everything we need for Star Wars Rebellion without having to play on the floor. So far myself and my girlfriend have managed two games since we got it... we'd play more but our first game took 6 hours and our second almost 4, which makes it tricky on a work night. To be fair though, I think a large part of those extreme game lengths are us being a bit new to it and still having to refer to the rule reference book a lot. We're hoping to move next year anyway, and if we do we've discussed getting a MobyGeek table for the new place so we can leave longer games like this setup to come back to.

 

Rebellion is absolutely bloody brilliant though! I can see why boardgamegeek.com have it listed so highly! The combat is sadly a negative at times, particularly when a big battle breaks out, which you'd think would be a deal-breaker for a war game. Weirdly everything else works so well it isn't. But yeah, the combat is weighted so that sometimes miracles or good luck can happen, but when your opponent moves a tonne of units into one of your territories and you start thinking about all the dice rolls, tactic cards, damage markers and mental gymnastics tracking all this will entail, the temptation is often to just take your pieces off the board and say "fuck it, you win this one". Which both myself and my gf have done at times.

 

Smaller skirmishes are fun though and a lot of what really makes the game is the deliberately unbalanced nature - with the Empire just spreading out throughout the galaxy with overwhelming military might, making the Rebel player sweat constantly, whilst the Rebels keep pulling missions and objectives that require them to be total dicks to the Empire player - and this has all so far lead to good fun, laugh-out-loud moments more than frustrating, potentially relationship-breaking ones.

 

If you've not played it, the object of the game is simply that the Empire has a finite number of turns to locate and destroy the secret Rebel base, with the Rebels able to complete objectives to lower this number of turns, provide other setbacks to the Empire and even relocate the base in a pinch. I've played as the Empire in both games so far and it's fun when you're suddenly convinced you know where the base is hidden, get your Death Star up there primed and ready and then have your girlfriend gleefully tell you "Nope, it's not there!"

 

I do need to try and find some better way to handle the combat though.

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20 minutes ago, Zio said:

I do need to try and find some better way to handle the combat though.

 

Combat is better in the expansion Rise of the Empire - but it's still the weakest part of the game.

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Currently delving into the dungeons below Dragonfire Castle thanks to having snagged a copy of the Revised 3rd edition on eBay last week.  I love DungeonQuest.  Despite now having this, I'm keeping hold of the GW version I also have for the feels maaaaannn.

 

Yes that's a cave-in for my first draw :wub:

 

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