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Kindle shop Recommendations


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On 09/11/2021 at 07:20, Miner Willy said:

I listened to it on audible and it was really great. 


Cheers, I picked this up on Audible after your post as it’s in my Kindle pile of shame and god knows when I’d get around to it, and it’s a brilliant listen!

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In terms of hardware, Amazon look to be offloading previous gen Kindle stock now that their new version is out - currently you can pick up a 8GB Paperwhite with leather cover for £90 or the 32GB with cover for £95. These are the 10th gen waterproof models.

 

Alternatively, you can get these Kindles without a cover for £75 (8GB) or £80 (32GB).

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Also, if you don't like the advert version, I believe you can pay extra later on to upgrade the advert version to a no-advert version, and the amount is equivalent (I think) to the difference in price between the two versions new, so in theory there's no downside to buying the advert version if you're not sure.

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They also seem to have improved the adverts recently, until a few months ago they seemed completely random and kept recommending me terrible historical romances I would never ever buy, but now they are clearly based on my reading history. I just wish they were a bit smarter as they are usually just "here's another book by an author you've recently read" which is fairly obvious really, if they were actually decent suggestions based on genre etc I'd probably end up buying a few of them.

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I had a brief period of these improved adverts before it reverted, although I'm not sure the algorithm was doing much more than noting the book I was reading (Agassi's autobiography) and recommending a bunch of similar things (McEnroe and Nadal, ad infinitum). 

 

Now it's back to the chick lit, an obvious follow on from the Andy Weir's latest sci-fi novel.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ooh, I loved Bounce by Matthew Syed. There's an early example of his theory in the book which talks about something like seven of the nation's top 10 table tennis players coming from the same street - I loved that.

 

Epic name drop: I think I was due to play him in a table tennis match as a kid, but in the end ours was a 'dead rubber' (we'd already lost) so not played. Now if that's not an impressive claim to fame, I don't know what is.

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1 hour ago, Stopharage said:

 

For any SF fans out there, these are all worth your while.

 

Roadside Picnic was the basis for the Stalker film and games, and tells of a world where aliens visited and left behind "rubbish" that is of great value to both scientists and collectors, providing you can get in and out of the affected areas without dying or getting caught by the patrols hunting for criminal theft.

 

Neuromancer is the quintessential cyberpunk novel (and you have to read this to understand exactly what Neal Stephenson was taking the piss out of with Snow Crash. I read them in reverse order and Snow Crash was somewhat baffling as a result) and though some of it has dated a little, much of it remains excellent.

 

Revelation Space is one for the space opera and hard SF fans, as Reynolds doesn't go in for any FTL travel in his book which tells of humanity's spread into the stars and the dangers that lie in wait. For a first novel, it's a bit rough in places and the ending is a gigantic fucking info-dump that ends on a cliffhanger, but if you like space opera, you should read it.


The Dispossessed is where the concept of "ansibles" originates from (FTL communication devices) and I can't really summarise what it's about very well, but it's widely lauded as one of Le Guin's best books and is up there with The Left Hand of Darkness.

 

Lastly, The Forever War was written as an analogy of the Vietnam War, and charts the experiences of the veterans of a very distant war returning to Earth and finding themselves increasingly alienated from society after each tour of duty due to increased spans of time passing in their absence due to the effects of relativity.

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I was only thinking of recommending Inverted world yesterday. It’s by the same author as the Nolan film, the Prestige and it’s excellent.

As is American tabloid. Probably my favourite fiction about the Kennedy assassination and Bay of pigs debacle ever (first of a trilogy and all are essential reading).

The Power of the dog is a modern masterpiece about the Narco trade and is again the first of a trilogy.

Lastly, I’ve recommended it before and will again…Doomsday book is a favourite from University that I reread a few yrs ago. If you like time travel books then it’s for you. (warning ..both timelines are set in time of pandemic).

 

 

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 I was on my phone when I typed that list (don't ask).

 

Anyway, bit more on The Only Plane in the Sky, which I recommended above. It's an exhaustingly researched account of what happened on 9/11 through the words of over 500 people who were directly involved. From rescue workers to survivors, it’s an incredibly absorbing work that took the best part of 10 years to write. Would recommend this to anyone who has a passing interest in this. The audiobook is fantastic too. 

 

In Splendid and the Vile Erik Larson shows how Churchill taught the British people "the art of being fearless." It is a story of political brinkmanship, but it's also an intimate domestic drama, set against the backdrop of Churchill's prime-ministerial country home, Chequers; his wartime retreat, Ditchley, where he and his entourage go when the moon is brightest and the bombing threat is highest; and of course 10 Downing Street in London. Drawing on diaries, original archival documents, and once-secret intelligence reports--some released only recently--Larson provides a new lens on London's darkest year through the day-to-day experience of Churchill and his family: his wife, Clementine; their youngest daughter, Mary, who chafes against her parents' wartime protectiveness; their son, Randolph, and his beautiful, unhappy wife, Pamela; Pamela's illicit lover, a dashing American emissary; and the advisers in Churchill's "Secret Circle," to whom he turns in the hardest moments. It's another superb book by Larson. I have no major interest in WW2 and found it utterly illuminating. 

 

Lily Allen's autobiography is another decent read, somewhat surprisingly. It elicits a mixture of bemusement, sympathy and eye-raising but is entertaining throughout. 

 

Both are up there with the very best I've read in the last 2 years. Well with the financial and time investment. 

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38 minutes ago, Stopharage said:

 I was on my phone when I typed that list (don't ask).

 

Anyway, bit more on The Only Plane in the Sky, which I recommended above. It's an exhaustingly researched account of what happened on 9/11 through the words of over 500 people who were directly involved. From rescue workers to survivors, it’s an incredibly absorbing work that took the best part of 10 years to write. Would recommend this to anyone who has a passing interest in this. The audiobook is fantastic too. 

 

In Splendid and the Vile Erik Larson shows how Churchill taught the British people "the art of being fearless." It is a story of political brinkmanship, but it's also an intimate domestic drama, set against the backdrop of Churchill's prime-ministerial country home, Chequers; his wartime retreat, Ditchley, where he and his entourage go when the moon is brightest and the bombing threat is highest; and of course 10 Downing Street in London. Drawing on diaries, original archival documents, and once-secret intelligence reports--some released only recently--Larson provides a new lens on London's darkest year through the day-to-day experience of Churchill and his family: his wife, Clementine; their youngest daughter, Mary, who chafes against her parents' wartime protectiveness; their son, Randolph, and his beautiful, unhappy wife, Pamela; Pamela's illicit lover, a dashing American emissary; and the advisers in Churchill's "Secret Circle," to whom he turns in the hardest moments. It's another superb book by Larson. I have no major interest in WW2 and found it utterly illuminating. 

 

Lily Allen's autobiography is another decent read, somewhat surprisingly. It elicits a mixture of bemusement, sympathy and eye-raising but is entertaining throughout. 

 

Both are up there with the very best I've read in the last 2 years. Well with the financial and time investment. 

I just started The Only Plane in the Sky on your recommendation. Listening on Audible - very worthy of the praise so far. 

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6 hours ago, Stopharage said:

The much lauded (frequently by me, and others) Station Eleven by Emily St Mandel is  99p today. 


I thought thats fantastic, been hearing good things about this for ages, went to buy and..

0D9053EE-71C5-486A-95DC-C819C8F729B7.thumb.jpeg.5cdb53f34c82e118c14fcdcb8e6fe3af.jpeg

 

🤦‍♂️

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10 minutes ago, Talvalin said:

Received a physical copy as a present in 2013.

Bought the Kindle edition in 2017.

Still haven't read it.

Fail.

 

Get it read, it's one of those rare books that completely lives up to and is deserving of the hype.

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