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Trying to launch two gaming platforms that're both portable PlayStations with very similar controllers, but entirely different capabilities, simultaneously, is something else entirely. The press will be talking about one new PlayStation gizmo one week and a completely distinct but very similar one the next. One of them is going to suffer, and I'm pretty sure it's going to be the PSP Phone.

I'm not sure what'd be worse for the situation, if the PSP2 has 3G or if it doesn't have 3G. It might come across like Nokia's comical range of 5800 descendants, where you could get a phone with 3G but no GPS, or wifi and GPS but a worse camera.

It also reeks of the "old Sony" where rival groups were constantly fighting with each other and there was no overall brand strategy. The Sony that had its consumer electronics unit building a handheld PlayStation that was shit-canned the minute the PlayStation unit got wind of it. Really, look at this, you've got the next generation of PlayStation handheld, and the triumphant arrival of PlayStation on the Android platform. Why the hell aren't these the same events? Is it even remotely plausible that someone important in PlayStation will be around to help launch the Xperia Play to the media?

But the PSPhone isn't actually PlayStation branded, is it? the games division have been resisting allowing the phone division use of their brand for ages now, it doesn't seem that the Xperia Play really changes the status quo on that front, it's just some Android OS device AFAIK which happens to have two wierd looking flat circular surfaces and a hint of PS-branding with the PS 4 controller icon branding, but doesn't play PSP games, even if it does look rather too much like a PSPGO.

The games division are going to be concentrating on their own device, which seems more and more likely to be revealed in 2 weeks time, Game Informer have been invited, unless it turns out to be the official reveal for Xperia Play :P

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But the PSPhone isn't actually PlayStation branded, is it? the games division have been resisting allowing the phone division use of their brand for ages now, it doesn't seem that the Xperia Play really changes the status quo on that front, it's just some Android OS device AFAIK which happens to have two wierd looking flat circular surfaces and a hint of PS-branding with the PS 4 controller icon branding, but doesn't play PSP games, even if it does look rather too much like a PSPGO.

The games division are going to be concentrating on their own device, which seems more and more likely to be revealed in 2 weeks time, Game Informer have been invited, unless it turns out to be the official reveal for Xperia Play :P

It's basically a moderately top-end Android phone that plays PS1 game at the moment and, I suspect, will play Minis, isn't it?

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From the article:

Perhaps most importantly for Sony’s intent to pitch the device as a portable PS3, the device apparently has dual analogue sticks. Sony is specifically asking developers to focus on deep, content-rich game experiences to differentiate PSP2 from app-focused smartphones.

Which is a bit of a pain if you just want to play a short and simple game to kill 15 minutes. I'm not saying there isn't a place for deeper games on handhelds (as long as you can suspend and resume your game frequently enough), but I don't think that they should ignore smaller games - the retro compilations and minis are excellent for brief distraction.

Whilst I use my PSP nearly every day (admittedly mostly to check the Store) and enjoy many games for it, I imagine my next handheld will be a 3DS (my new year's resolution to spend less on games may mean that I won't get one for a while, but hopefully by then Ninty will have released a few improved models) - unless the PSP2 has titles to rival Nintendo's line up I'm not sure if I'll bother. It doesn't help that I still think the PSP1 has a lot of potential to expand in terms of full games, minis, PSOne classics and (decent) portable spin-offs of home console franchises; if anything I don't know if I'm ready for a PSP2 yet...

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I think they want developers to concentrate on content rich games because they accept they've already lost the war for the fifteen minutes of distraction market. They can either try to make the PSP the device you always have with you or they can accept you've got your phone or iPod touch and aren't going to be carrying anything else unless it's doing something very different.

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From the article:

Which is a bit of a pain if you just want to play a short and simple game to kill 15 minutes. I'm not saying there isn't a place for deeper games on handhelds (as long as you can suspend and resume your game frequently enough), but I don't think that they should ignore smaller games - the retro compilations and minis are excellent for brief distraction.

Whilst I use my PSP nearly every day (admittedly mostly to check the Store) and enjoy many games for it, I imagine my next handheld will be a 3DS (my new year's resolution to spend less on games may mean that I won't get one for a while, but hopefully by then Ninty will have released a few improved models) - unless the PSP2 has titles to rival Nintendo's line up I'm not sure if I'll bother. It doesn't help that I still think the PSP1 has a lot of potential to expand in terms of full games, minis, PSOne classics and (decent) portable spin-offs of home console franchises; if anything I don't know if I'm ready for a PSP2 yet...

From later in the article:

it will also offer downloads of smaller games and apps through PSN.

:P

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:P

I don't doubt that smaller PSN games will have an outlet; I'm just worried that Sony is specifically asking for an emphasis on deeper games. The PSN stuff shouldn't be reduced to a curio.

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I don't doubt that smaller PSN games will have an outlet; I'm just worried that Sony is specifically asking for an emphasis on deeper games. The PSN stuff shouldn't be reduced to a curio.

I would presume they're not asking PS Mini developers to gun for "rich games" if that's what you mean.

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I'm really interested to see how sony intends to distribute titles for it. if they proceed with an all digital route like the pspgo, I have the feeling that the retailers aren't going to be too happy as there is no incentive to push something which is netting them [maybe] 2% on the hardware and the only residuals would then be accessory items.

with the elimination of disc-based drive mechanism (to conserve power), my guess is that sony will develop a priorietary secure hybrid memory stick-cartridge (read only portion for game code with a read/write portion for saves and DLC) for it so that they have a physical media to appease the retailers.

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I'm really interested to see how sony intends to distribute titles for it. if they proceed with an all digital route like the pspgo, I have the feeling that the retailers aren't going to be too happy as there is no incentive to push something which is netting them [maybe] 2% on the hardware and the only residuals would then be accessory items.

with the elimination of disc-based drive mechanism (to conserve power), my guess is that sony will develop a priorietary secure hybrid memory stick-cartridge (read only portion for game code with a read/write portion for saves and DLC) for it so that they have a physical media to appease the retailers.

The leaks this week are that it's got physical storage. Personally I think it'll probably be higher-capacity UMDs to allow for back compatibility, plus it saves on manufacturing infrastructure changes. As much as they're UMDLOL the major power consumer in the PSP isn't the disc drive.

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The leaks this week are that it's got physical storage. Personally I think it'll probably be higher-capacity UMDs to allow for back compatibility, plus it saves on manufacturing infrastructure changes. As much as they're UMDLOL the major power consumer in the PSP isn't the disc drive.

I hope that it's not that. with the prices of static memory still falling a pretty regular basis, I would hope that sony wouldn't attempt yet another optical format doomed for failure (ala mini-disc and umd).

lessons should be learned from their rivals (nintendo) as well as all of the current portable tech out there, that the convience of something in a memory card form factor which is pretty durable vs. the optical mess that was the umd (the enclosed optical media with an exposed window just screams for dust and dirt to invade and no way for the end user to properly clean it)

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I hope that it's not that. with the prices of static memory still falling a pretty regular basis, I would hope that sony wouldn't attempt yet another optical format doomed for failure (ala mini-disc and umd).

lessons should be learned from their rivals (nintendo) as well as all of the current portable tech out there, that the convience of something in a memory card form factor which is pretty durable vs. the optical mess that was the umd (the enclosed optical media with an exposed window just screams for dust and dirt to invade and no way for the end user to properly clean it)

What was "doomed to failure" about UMD? It got games into PSPs, and I never had issues with the discs working, not to mention it's probably still a bit cheaper than flash ROM.

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I think that morrius' comments allude to the fact that sony loves to continually create formats which only they use (by making the licensing costs so high that it's unfeasable for any other company to use or adopt the technology) which in then turn, they themselves pitch and move onto a newer proprietary one-time-use format.

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Betamax

DAT

Minidisc

ATRAC

Memorystick

etc

NES cartridge

SNES cartridge

N64 cartridge

Game Boy Advance cartridge

etc? :unsure:

Fun game Morrius, but I don't see what listing formats that were only used for one system is worth.

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Eh?

When Nintendo used cartridges it was developed solely for a single Nintendo console. They didn't use it across multiple devices or try to license it to other people (other than those who developed for the single Nintendo console which utilised it).

Every attempt by Sony to launch a new media format by including it in all their latest products and forcing it onto people, thus trying to convince other manufacturers to license the technology for their non-Sony devices, has failed.

(Except Bluray and DVD but these were co-developed)

To analogise, Nintendo cartidges are a ping pong ball used for playing Ping Pong. A single format for a single device. Sony on the other hand keep bringing square shaped footballs to school and trying to get everyone to play square shaped football with them, whilst simultaneously trying to sell square shaped footballs in the changing rooms. For more than the normal ones cost.

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Eh?

When Nintendo used cartridges it was solely for a single Nintendo console.

Every attempt by Sony to launch a new media format by including it in all their latest products and forcing it onto people, thus trying to convince other manufacturers to license the technology for their non-Sony devices, has failed.

(Except Bluray and DVD but these were co-developed)

To analogise, Nintendo cartidges are a ping pong ball used for playing Ping Pong. Sony on the other hand keep bringing square shaped footballs to school and trying to get everyone to play square shaped football with them, whilst simultaneously trying to sell square shaped footballs in the changing rooms. For more than normal ones cost.

Granted, but I still fail to see what this has to do with UMD. It was designed for getting media into PSPs as much as GBA cartridges were used for getting GBA media into GBAs (including, but not limited to, music, video and games). Makes sense to replace them with a media in the same form factor to allow for back compatible drives.

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That'd be an odd time to reveal it, it'd be about as far away from a games conference and all the corresponding hype and publisher reveals as they could possibly muster.

The 3ds was announced by press release wasn't it?

I'm really interested to see how sony intends to distribute titles for it.

It was suggested a few weeks ago that it would use proprietary solid state storage, presumably allowing games of many gb's. So you'd have a game slot and a regular additional storage slot

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It was designed as a portable smaller DVD format in the same vein as minidisc to CD. I guess they could continue to use it in the PSP2 but the format is dead - they've already tried the PSP Go as an alternative.

It's not hard to understand, they do it constantly, Sony is painfully in love with proprietary formats, though after decades of these being miserable failures, they might have learnt something.

I haven't been keeping up - what are they planning with the PSP2?

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without attempting to turn this into an argument, at least nintendo had the hindsight to make their future generations of their portable products backwards compatible. the gameboy color played gameboy carts. the gameboy advance played both gameboy and gameboy color cartridges and the DS and DS lite played gameboy advance software. nintendo has continued to shrink down the form factor of their media, making them more easily carried about. additionally, the DSi / DSiLL uses standard sd / sdhc memory cards rather than some propriety format.

correct me if I'm wrong, but the sony's latest M3 memory stick format (created for the psp go) is already on the way out as well.

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It was designed as a portable smaller DVD format in the same vein as minidisc to CD. I guess they could continue to use it in the PSP2 but the format is dead - they've already tried the PSP Go as an alternative.

I haven't been keeping up - what are they planning with the PSP2?

You're quoting the PSP Go as an example of why Sony should drop physical media?

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Lol? No, I'm quoting is as an example that Sony dropped the UMD.

Why would you even think that was what I meant?

They'll do what Sony always do, come up with some other proprietary format. Which is fine, but if they think they can license it to other people or convince people to buy films/music using that format, they're mistaken. I trust they are aiming to only deliver games with it, and doing everything else digitally or via an industry standard memory stick, which is the sensible thing to do.

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without attempting to turn this into an argument, at least nintendo had the hindsight to make their future generations of their portable products backwards compatible. the gameboy color played gameboy carts. the gameboy advance played both gameboy and gameboy color cartridges and the DS and DS lite played gameboy advance software. nintendo has continued to shrink down the form factor of their media, making them more easily carried about. additionally, the DSi / DSiLL uses standard sd / sdhc memory cards rather than some propriety format.

correct me if I'm wrong, but the sony's latest M3 memory stick format (created for the psp go) is already on the way out as well.

M3 was out a solid year before PSP Go, it was brought in for Sony mobiles IIRC. But regardless, you're saying that because Nintendo supported back compatibility, Sony... shouldn't? :unsure: Or that because the discs are still about the same size they won't sell? Or something?

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To be honest, though backwards compatibility is always a good thing, boxed PSP software sales were so low that there isn't much point. I guess they weighed up the pros and cons. You never know though, it is Sony.

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Lol? No, I'm quoting is as an example that Sony dropped the UMD.

Why would you even think that was what I meant?

I don't know, the PSP Go was Sony's pre-PSP2 experiment to see if people would adopt a physical-media-less games console and it failed miserably. People like buying tiny discs and cartridges. The PSP Go if anything is evidence that Sony won't ship a system without physical media for another 2000 years.

It makes as much sense to uses discs in the PSP2 as solid state media costs- and functionality-wise, and if you're going that way you might as well retain the UMD form factor since it seems to have worked with the PSP (62 million gamers can't be wrong!) and would enable them to maintain the PSP game revenue stream while transitioning PSP owners to the new system.

There's no advantage to switching to flash media except cutting back compatibility; the DS showed they arn't any less susceptable to piracy and cost more to make.

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Regarding Sony and formats I need to go into pedant mode:

MiniDisc was a success in my opinion. It was widely used by many for several years before newer technology made it redundant.

DAT was for many years a studio standard for digital audio and again IMO, not a failure.

Betamax was widely used in Japan, especially the high quality version which I can't remember the name of.

They co-developed the CD with Philips and that wasn't exactly a failure either.

What I'm saying is that it isn't quite as black/white as some might think. But I do agree that Sony have a weird habit of trying to push their own formats on a world that's really not interested. I think ATRAC is probably the worst example. It took years before you could get an MP3 player from Sony that actually played MP3, all the while Apple were cleaning up and laughing at the once mighty house of Walkman. Which makes me think, how the fuck do you fuck up something as iconic as the Walkman? Probably much the same way they almost did with PlayStation. Oh Sony.

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I think about 30 million of them were running custom firmware though :sherlock:

No kidding.

Another reason to go proprietory rather than distribute games on, say, miniSD is that you don't have people in the wild plugging your game media into standard off-the-shelf readers and poking around looking for security vunerabilities, which (given Sony's past week...) is something companies will be looking carefully at.

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Regarding Sony and formats I need to go into pedant mode:

MiniDisc was a success in my opinion. It was widely used by many for several years before newer technology made it redundant.

DAT was for many years a studio standard for digital audio and again IMO, not a failure.

Betamax was widely used in Japan, especially the high quality version which I can't remember the name of.

They co-developed the CD with Philips and that wasn't exactly a failure either.

Also worth mentioning that the world-standard 3 1/2" floppy disk is built to a spec based heavily on one Sony came up with.

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