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Pseudo-scenes that blew you away


Gabe
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So I was just reading the 'Super 8' thread and Fishy had posted the picture of *that* moment in Signs, and it made me immediately think of a similar scene in Exocist 3 - in that it felt it was just nonchalantly placed and detached from what was happening at the time - and yet was either terrifying/amazing. I actually think that bit is the best thing Shyamalan has done. I'm totally serious, too.

So yeah, not like a full scene per-se, but a mini-scene. A cameo, if you will (with the piece of film being the 'star'). That makes sense in my head.

But anyway, what other little snippets in films have scared the crap out of you/chilled you/made you laugh hysterically that follow my template?

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I saw Dario Argento's 'Inferno' the other day and in the build up to one of his murderous setpieces there is a cutaway to a pair of black-gloved hands cutting the heads of a string of paper dolls followed by a close-up of a woman being hanged from a light fitting and choking to death. Neither the hands, the dolls or the lynching victim appear anywhere else in the film and it really freaked me out to see them stuck in there so nonchalantly. Brrrrrrr.

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If we are including that Exorcist 3 scene, which is great, then would the following count from The Shining?

The totally random and eerie scene where the camera fleetingly reveals a guy in a bear suit fellating another man.

That actually has some backstory in the novel, but to my mind it's far creepier when it just appears to be completely random.

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I'm actually going against my own rules here, but I always found the video in The Ring (US version) to be quite disturbing, even though it is pretty tame.

I find the video in the original version creepy, just the people being killed by the volcano for some reason. Is the US version much different?

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I find the video in the original version creepy, just the people being killed by the volcano for some reason. Is the US version much different?

Yeah, there are only a few of similar bits. I find the very last bit (in both the US and Japanese vids) just focusing on the well very oppressive.

As for other bit, House on Haunted Hill has a few little bits - but one of the most innocuous is when the guy is in the projection-type thing and the Doctor is bouncing the ball. Something about it unsettles me.

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I'm actually going against my own rules here, but I always found the video in The Ring (US version) to be quite disturbing, even though it is pretty tame.

Same here. That spinning chair scares the fucking shit out of me.

Im not usually scared by things, but I dont even think I can rewatch that :(

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I think it's a part of a film that comes out of nowhere, perhaps out of context for the film/scene.

Like the Signs footage, you're looking at an alley way when for the briefest of seconds the aliens walks passed and looks at the camera. Short, sharp shock.

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I haven't seen it for a while so I hope I'm remembering this correctly but there's a scene early on in Poltergeist where Diane

opens the kitchen swing door, it swings back towards the screen and then back open again and in that split second the entire contents of the kitchen has been rearranged. Chairs stacked weirdly on tables etc.

even with all the scenes that come after that point that's still the one that stays with me

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There's a scene in The Mothman Prophecies where, following a series of disturbing phonecalls from a mysterious entity, Richard Gere slams the mirrored door of the wardrobe in the hotel room he's staying in. As the door slowly swings back open a horrible face can be seen reflected in the mirror for the briefest of moments (it's probably a single frame) but it's enough to give the viewer a shudder.

There's an incredibly effective scene in The Woman in Black where something unexpected appears in the scene.

The protagonist is alone in the bleak marshland ruins and it's clear no-one else is present, but when he moves position the camera reveals the horrible, wasplike figure of the woman who is now standing and staring at him from a place where no-one was before.

Also, the TV show Ghostwatch has many scenes such as this where Pipes is hidden in plain sight.

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There's a scene in The Mothman Prophecies wgere, following a series of disturbing phonecalls from a mysterios entity, Richard Gere slams the mirrored door of the wardrobe in the hotel room he's staying in. As the door slowly swings back open a horrible face can be seen reflected in the mirror for the briefest of moments (it's probably a single frame) but it's enough to give the viewer a shudder.

Weirdly enough I was thinking of this film not an hour ago.

I was thinking of the bit where he smashes his head into the mirror though.

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I'm not sure if this counts but it's my favourite bit from Night of the Hunter. The scene where Mitchum and that mum are having a stand off outside her house. One of the daughters then comes in with a candle, obscuring Mitchum from our sight. And with barely a moment wasted as the mum and daughter speak, we catch a glimpse of Mitchum's silhouette disappearing in the background. It's just so quick, so sudden and very much a blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment.

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