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Mad Max "Shiny & Chrome"


Boozy The Clown
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Actually looked surprisingly good, but the Sept release date is a bit weird considering the film is out in a couple of weeks. I'd be quite hyped for it if it was due out around the same time but I'm not sure I'll care come September :(

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Actually looked surprisingly good, but the Sept release date is a bit weird considering the film is out in a couple of weeks. I'd be quite hyped for it if it was due out around the same time but I'm not sure I'll care come September :(

Jesus CHRIST, remember when we used to by cynical about movie licensed games coming out at the same time as the film?

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Actually looked surprisingly good, but the Sept release date is a bit weird considering the film is out in a couple of weeks. I'd be quite hyped for it if it was due out around the same time but I'm not sure I'll care come September :(

Now I understand marketing.

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Don't be daft. I didn't say they should release an unfinished game to tie in with the movie, just that it would be nice if it were ready to be released at the same time as the movie when most people are actually interested in it. Release it at the end of the year when the other big hitters come out (5 months after the film) and I'll find it hard to care.

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My position is that I've not seen a Mad Max film (wasn't even alive when they came out) so the upcoming film will be the first thing in that "universe" that I see. Assuming it's good then I'd definitely be excited to play the game straight away, especially as there's not much else out until TW3. But I can't see myself still being desperate to play it in 5 months time, especially when other games I'm looking forward to are coming out. It might stand out (similar to Shadow of Mordor) but there's obviously no guarantee of that.

But yeah, it totally makes sense for whoever that was to neg someone for saying the game looks good but they just wish they could play it sooner :facepalm:

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My position is that I've not seen a Mad Max film (wasn't even alive when they came out) so the upcoming film will be the first thing in that "universe" that I see. Assuming it's good then I'd definitely be excited to play the game straight away, especially as there's not much else out until TW3. But I can't see myself still being desperate to play it in 5 months time, especially when other games I'm looking forward to are coming out. It might stand out (similar to Shadow of Mordor) but there's obviously no guarantee of that.

But yeah, it totally makes sense for whoever that was to neg someone for saying the game looks good but they just wish they could play it sooner :facepalm:

But you're talking as if you wont buy it because it comes out in November. Which is a bizzarre way of looking at it.

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  • 4 weeks later...

New trailer:



Preview: http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2015-05-25-mad-max-preview

Just a few minutes before sitting down for an interview with Peter Wyse, Warner Bros' senior vice president of production and development, I get a good 20 minutes of hands-on time with the game, where I'm free to roam the Wasteland as I please. In fairness to Wyse, I do get a sense that the two properties are cut from different cloths.

Both have been in development for a long time - Miller had been trying to get Fury Road off the ground since 1998, and Warner's been plugging away at a game for a fair while too. "It's been about 4 years at this point," says Wyse. "But that's from the time that we started working with George Miller, waiting for the team; the game that we're playing right now, it's probably like three years plus." Wyse is enthusiastic about Mad Max creator and director George Miller's contribution to the game's mythology, of course. "Oh, he's so much fun to work with. You just sit down with him, his mind goes in like 400 different ways, and he's been living with this universe since, you know, the mid-70s probably, when he started thinking about it. It's just a real pleasure; you mine whatever you can out of his mind. He was great about setting up the rules of the universe, and we just absorbed as much as we could and then went off and made the game."


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Yep I'm aboard the hype train too. Already paid for it thanks to Tesco's recent pre-order offer.

Know it's unlikely but would be great if they could get some of the film's music into the game. Proper epic stuff.

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Meh, every game these days is just 'about fulfilling checklists'. Take Shadow of Mordor for example: Playing that at the moment and enjoying the hell out of it (10 hours in 2 days) but it's basically a big errand run for the game developer.

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Yeah, it seemed odd of kotaku (NOT REALLY CLICKBAIT) to single out this game. I've no doubt you can turn the notifications off, so it's basically a big deal over nothing. No different from turning off trophy /achievement notifications in any other game.

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Jeff talks about it a bit on the Bombcast this week and is also a bit down in it. It doesn't sound great, I am very tired of the 'shopping list' style of open world game design.

Yeah, it's a particular shame when we've just had The Witcher 3 come out and show how to make a vast, open world filled with things to do and not have it feel like a Ubisoft collectathon.

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Dunno, feels a bit Ubi-ish to me. Gotta find every place of power, gotta collect every Gwent card, gotta visit and complete every question mark...?

TW3 is marvellous of course, but it's not that far removed from planet gamify.

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Jeff talks about it a bit on the Bombcast this week and is also a bit down in it. It doesn't sound great, I am very tired of the 'shopping list' style of open world game design.

To be fair, it's Jeff from Bombcast you're talking about. He's been a miserable fucker about games for a looooooooooong time now.

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Dunno, feels a bit Ubi-ish to me. Gotta find every place of power, gotta collect every Gwent card, gotta visit and complete every question mark...?

TW3 is marvellous of course, but it's not that far removed from planet gamify.

The important distinctions being that a) I was able to (and did) turn the question marks off as soon as I started the game, thus avoiding that "gotta catch 'em all!" when there's absolutely no signposting of Things Happening, and even if the Ubisoft brand of games allowed you to do that they would still feel far more 'gamey' than The Witcher 3 because b) every single situation that you come across in the world is distinct and actually makes sense in the game world (and everything bar the monster nests/dens are story-filled), rather than the cookie-cutter design that typefies Ubisoft's games.

Most games of that ilk just throw mild variations of the same event at you over and over again, plastered across the map like a particularly weird retail chain (deal with 20 slightly different bases! Hack into 20 different camera networks! Collect 100 shards!), where your actions feel like nothing more than going through the motions for (eventual) reward. The Witcher 3's situations all just feel like unique, logical encounters in a war-torn land, and your actions purposeful: stumbling across men razing a house as you're on your way to a city, do you intervene or let them carry on? You encounter two tradesman squabbling over a monster loosed in their shared warehouse - do you deal with the monster, and if so do you work out who was responsible, and if you do so do you tell anyone about it? You happen across an abandoned village - do you explore, try to work out what's happened, or do you avoid it?

There's no collectathons,* no repeated 'activities' (unless killing monsters, or occasionally destroying their nests is considered an 'activity') to engage in, just a wartorn world to explore; a world in which things are happening, and where you can intervene in those things if you so choose, rather than a landscape with identikit activities strewn about it at random.

*bar the CCG, but even that is at least mitigated by being entirely dealt with by buying cards from vendors and having the option to challenge certain characters - that you would deal with anyway for main quests/purchasing items - to the game if you feel like it

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  • 3 weeks later...

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