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I'm Still Here:

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Lifted from Cinematical -

According to a piece at Indiewire, the new Casey Affleck-directed mockumentary I'm Still Here: the Lost Year of Joaquin Phoenix has started its ad campaign with some graffiti spotted in the Chelsea area of downtown Manhattan. The "mysterious" graffiti consists of a stencil of Joaquin Phoenix's head with crazy hair and shades sans mention of the film's title or what the images are for.

This kind of advertising tactic isn't that remarkable when you think about it -- I mean, even the Omen remake used a street-level ad campaign to get attention, marking parts of the Lower East Side with the number "666" sprayed in a circular pattern. It's actually even a little groanworthy considering that it's an attempt to give Affleck's mock-doc a faux-street art feel. We get it, it's guerrilla art. Nyuk nyuk, ha ha. And this is coming from someone that got a kick out of Joaquin's performance on Letterman.

What I'm more interested in regarding the Indiewire piece is the mention that Affleck is being sued for sexual harassment by cinematographer Magdalena Gorka. Gorka claims that Affleck groped her, was generally unpleasant around the set and didn't pay her and eventually removed her credit from the film after she quit. Affleck's lawyer says that Gorka's claims are "fishy" and wonders why she hasn't made a stink about these allegations until now. Which itself should be a no-brainer: more attention thanks to Affleck's movie, obviously. Just because she knows how to get attention doesn't mean her claim is necessarily false. In any case, read more about the suit here and check out the graffiti here. I'm Still Here: the Lost Year of Joaquin Phoenix is slated to come out September 10th.

Is this old news? I seem to recall that we were speculating that this would turn out to be a mocumentary when videos appeared on Youtube of him falling off stage.

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Reviewing well.../film...

I’m Still Here, Casey Affleck’s controversial ‘documentary’ about his brother-in-law Joaquin Phoenix has finally premiered at the Venice Film Festival. The early reviews are in, and I’ve compiled some excerpts for you after the jump.

Variety: “Result is an utterly fascinating experiment that apparently blends real and faked material to examine notions of celebrity, mental stability and friendship. Whatever auds may think of Phoenix, there’s no doubting his chutzpah, though biz will depend on the level of voyeuristic interest in his and co-helmer Casey Affleck’s strange, postmodern psychodrama.” … “I’m Still Here” could be read as a more meta version of the filmmaking method deployed by Sacha Baron Cohen in “Borat” and “Bruno.” Except that there might be something more tragic, troubling and weird going on here.” … “Auds won’t be able to stop themselves from wondering who was in on the joke (if it was a joke) and who wasn’t.”

InContention: “The most surprising discovery about “I’m Still Here” is that the possibility of it being a ruse doesn’t much diminish its value. Indeed, the film is probably more interesting viewed as an immensely committed, avant-garde performance piece by Phoenix (“career suicide as conceptual art,” to quote one critic I spoke to after the screening) than as an ingenuous documentary – in which case, for all Affleck’s claims of wishing to offer a compassionate study of his friend, the film is a rather narrow, and even exploitative, work. In either light, Affleck has crafted a ragged but grimly compelling essay on our vile celebrity-news culture, in which the aggressors aren’t only the bottom-feeding journalists who delight in stories such as this one, but the celebrities – of whom Phoenix may well be one – who are spurred on by their attention.” … “I’m not convinced that “I’m Still Here” is entirely smart or meta enough to be exempt from this tail-eating circle, but it’s inarguably a film of its era: should it find its way into a time capsule, future viewers will learn a lot more about us from watching it than they will about Joaquin Phoenix.”

ScreenDaily: “Too wryly tongue-in-cheek to cut the mustard as a sincere and intimate portrait of a tortured talent undergoing a creative crisis.” … “The result is a film that is occasionally fascinating and sometimes quite funny, but more often too smugly and frustratingly pleased with its own mindgames. To do a Borat, I’m Still Here would need to come out of the ‘it’s all true’ closet; to be the “compassionate portrait” that Affleck was still insisting it was at the film’s post-premiere Venice presser, it would need to slam that closet door a lot more firmly than it does.”

Independent: “Affleck is a disarming filmmaker. This seems like straight fly-on-the-wall reportage from the battle zone that is Phoenix’s life. However, I’m Still Here is cleverly crafted and edited and often very funny indeed. If it is a hoax, Phoenix is giving one of the greatest method performances of all time.” … “Like its central character, the film is infuriating and provocative by turns.” … “The ridicule that is heaped on him arguably reveals just as much about celebrity-obsessed popular culture as it does about Phoenix himself. The film ends on a mildly redemptive but still mysterious note.”

Guardian: “I’m not sure I buy any of it, but the film is certainly compelling. Like a pair of po-faced co-conspirators, Affleck and Phoenix have cooked up an audacious little distraction; a stage-managed Hollywood Babylon that’s at once gaudily entertaining and wilfully self-indulgent.” … “Who cares, finally, whether this is a documentary or not? I’m Still Here paints a convincing portrait of a miserable, frustrated actor who has lived so long in the goldfish bowl that he can no longer conceive of a life beyond acting.”

Obsessed With Film: “At times the film is also rather too exaggerated to be completely legitimate. Coming close to resembling Borat.” … “Elements of the film seem a bit too convenient, for instance there are multiple cameras with all the angles covered, leaving it sometimes feeling like a Christopher Guest or Larry Charles faux documentary rather than the real thing. And the film adheres to elements of film-fiction structure (things mentioned always have a plot functionality and are usually a set up for something later).” … “There is no question, it is edited together for maximum humorous (as opposed to dramatic) impact, in a way that would be odd if Affleck has any love for his friend. There are even bits that feel straight out of a candid camera show” … “Whether it’s down to a genuine absurdity or to a dedicated genius performer (he’s kept this act up for two years now), I’m Still Here is really funny. I was in stitches for long spells of it and had the best time I’ve had in any film here.”

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Well, if it is a hoax (which it probably is, yes), Affleck seemingly has no intention of letting the cat out of the bag. I can't find the exact quote, but in response to a question about the authenticity of the film after it screened in Venice, he basically said that it's absolutely true, and that the notion of it being perceived as some kind of mockumentary hadn't entered his head until the press started speculating when the project was announced.

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It has to be a hoax, I think it was in Ebert's review, he mentioned that a number of the 'spontaneous' moments have multiple camera angles and framing. I guess it all adds to the myth of the film regardless. I've seen more than one review refer to it as Borat-like.

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It's definitely a hoax, but I've just read Ebert's review and it's really quite odd. He reviews it as though it's played totally straight, unless the review is part of the whole act? :lol:

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Being John Malkovitch wasn't "real", this isn't supposed to be either, I think is what he's saying when he talks about creating a "space".

It's a place where the fictional JP has a breakdown and indeed breaks down the paper thin boundries between the job (acting) and the real life of "celebrities".

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Just got back from seeing this. Its pretty good but I wish I hadn't read so much about it before seeing it, kind of spoilt it for myself. I loved the final scene, won't spoil it but its very beautiful.

Overall: Will Buy It on DVD when sub £8 in a sale.

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I really really want to see it but nowhere in Cambridge is showing it :facepalm:

how can I find out nearest place that is playing it?

edit : ah found a site that details such things. Nearest cinema is 50 miles away :facepalm:

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I decided a long time ago I wouldn't watch the Letterman interview until we knew for sure. It's been fascinating looking it up for the first time tonight. Reminds me of watching The Sixth Sense a year after everyone else, but not in a bad way.

Can't wait to hear the crowd reaction when he walks out for the reappearance this week.

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