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Retro Gamer - Issue 78


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Shiny turquoise cover featuring Lara Croft.

Retro Revival - Link II, Bloody Wolf, Repton, Aquanaut

Features: Loving Lara Croft, Thunder Force feature

Boss/Rush: Adventure (Atari 2600)

Retro Shamer: Awesome Possum

The making of...Rockstar Ate My Hamster, Shenmue, Xybots

The Classic Game: Monty on the Run

Retro Inspection - Atari 7800

The Unconverted

From the Archives - Magnetic Scrolls

In the chair with - Roland Perry

Also: some chumps Sega GameGear collection :unsure:

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I might have to pick this one up for aquanaut (the ST/Amiga shooter, yeah?)

Nope, C64 maze game by Interceptor..

Bob, seems to be a common problem with a lot of magazines, when they get sorted or pushed through letterboxes.

Looking forward to the David Crane piece in the next issue.

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Nope, C64 maze game by Interceptor..

Bob, seems to be a common problem with a lot of magazines, when they get sorted or pushed through letterboxes.

Looking forward to the David Crane piece in the next issue.

Yeah the outer plastic packaging is quite good but if its treatly roughly then it'll happen.

Its right where the issue number is as well. I just know I'll buy another one. :quote:

Love the Spectrum version of Red Dead. That would have been right up Ultimate's street. :)

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Really enjoyed the 7800 article. It didn't tell me much that I didn't already know, but was very well written.

Has anyone ploughed through the Xybots article yet? There's been a decent bit of coverage of the game in previous RG Logg coverage, so it'd be interesting to see if anything new surfaces in this interview.

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It's one of the new 2-page Q&A making of features, and it is quite interesting - talking about how it started as a new Gauntlet game, the rotational control method and so on.

Really enjoyed the Atari 7800 Retroinspection and the Making of Rock Star Ate My Hamster.

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Really enjoyed the 7800 article. It didn't tell me much that I didn't already know, but was very well written.

Thanks, I enjoyed writing it. But seriously, not much you don't already know? All the material regarding the internal competition between the 3600 and Famicom was never published anywhere before and taken directly from our internal Atari email archive. Likewise all the material regarding the ongoing negotations leading to the relaunch and the info on the relaunch itself, which had always been previously erroneously reported as Jack Tramiel simply mothballing the 7800 and taking it out in response to the NES. All stuff never published before and exclusive to this (though I admit I have talken about some of it previously in discussion forums).

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Thanks, I enjoyed writing it. But seriously, not much you don't already know? All the material regarding the internal competition between the 3600 and Famicom was never published anywhere before and taken directly from our internal Atari email archive. Likewise all the material regarding the ongoing negotations leading to the relaunch and the info on the relaunch itself, which had always been previously erroneously reported as Jack Tramiel simply mothballing the 7800 and taking it out in response to the NES. All stuff never published before and exclusive to this (though I admit I have talken about some of it previously in discussion forums).

It was a fantastic article, definitely added more "meat" to the bones of the story of the 7800- it was really interesting to read the goings on behind the scenes. I have no idea why, but I've got a soft spot for the 7800, even though I've never owned one and having played the games via emulation- they weren't exactly the greatest titles. But there's something about the packaging, especially the games, and something about the console itself that makes it such a great reflection on early 80s, 8-bit gaming. And I didn't realise Dark Chambers was the spiritual successor to Dandy, so I gave that a quick blast and I'm glad that I did!

Oh, and I hope you're writing an article on the Amiga at some point soon! :facepalm:

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And the Speccy version of Red Dead Redemption... wow, that would have been a fantastic game back then! Does make you think both how much and how little games have come on since then. You could basically recreate a modern game in an 8-bit style, with all of its limitations fairly easily- and yet the one thing that was really missing from most games back then was a good narrative, and good interaction with other characters in guiding you to what you needed to do next. Back then, you really had to guess (Where Time Stood Still and The Great Escape are two good examples, I had no clue what I was supposed to be doing!)

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Enjoyed the 7800 article, wouldn't have minded a couple more pages to be honest.

I'd always thought the deal fell through when Atari saw Donkey Kong running on a Colecovision as the CES show, and scrapped the deal due to not have exclusivity. Wonder what the face of gaming would look like had the deal gone through.

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Enjoyed the 7800 article, wouldn't have minded a couple more pages to be honest.

Well, that material will be much more elaborated on in our books when they eventually come out.

I'd always thought the deal fell through when Atari saw Donkey Kong running on a Colecovision as the CES show, and scrapped the deal due to not have exclusivity. Wonder what the face of gaming would look like had the deal gone through.

A lot of people thought that, I think it's one of those rumors that gets written once and then gets passed around until it's accepted as fact. Same thing with the whole Amiga/Atari thing.

It intrigues me with the whole situation, because my thoughts are also how it would have worked with the whole licensing thing. Would Atari have been required to adopt the exclusive licensing policy that Nintendo was doing in Japan and later imported to the NES? That would be a hard thing to pull off, because the industry just didn't work that way at the time. A company could develop for several systems, not just be locked in to one. And a property was routinely licensed across several platforms (computer, console, handheld/tabletop). It took the crash to clear out those practices.

Plus there was the same situation during the initial '84 launch of the 7800, with Atari also working on a next gen 68000 Amiga chip based console for release that Christmas. How would that have worked with the 7800 having just been released as their new top of the line advanced console?

And what if Morgan had been allowed to complete the reorganization he wanted to do instead of Warner negotiating to split it up behind his back, and then 7800 had been released with all the attachments as their flagship console as he intended? Could the new and leaner Atari have survived that '84-'86 period and would it have been such a lean period here in the States as it was?

Interestingly, all three consoles (the NES, 7800, and Sega Mater System) were treated as equals at the June '85 CES and that Fall. Nintendo had only had a poorly received New York test marketing that previous Fall and a better reception at the Los Angeles test marketing, but had yet to do the national launch. The NES didn't start pulling far ahead until after the Christmas '86 season. And that was mainly due to it's exclusive publishing/licensing practices collecting up the 3rd party studios.

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A lot of people thought that, I think it's one of those rumors that gets written once and then gets passed around until it's accepted as fact. Same thing with the whole Amiga/Atari thing.

I tell you were I read it and where it may have originated from and that was Steve L Kent's book The First Quarter. The story in there was pretty much how I posted it above - Atari were set to sign the deal - they were the bigger players then (at least on the surface) and Nintendo were trying to get a foot hold. Nintendo had licensed Donkey Kong to the Colecovision (whose version looked impressive) and someone from Atari saw it at the CES show and called the deal off.

Obviously there's now a lot more to it than that and as you say, that story has passed into urban myth.

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I tell you were I read it and where it may have originated from and that was Steve L Kent's book The First Quarter. The story in there was pretty much how I posted it above - Atari were set to sign the deal - they were the bigger players then (at least on the surface) and Nintendo were trying to get a foot hold. Nintendo had licensed Donkey Kong to the Colecovision (whose version looked impressive) and someone from Atari saw it at the CES show and called the deal off.

I just checked my copy of Steve's book. It only states that the collapse of the deal began at the 1983 CES show, not that it ended there.

It also covers Yamauchi's hysterics to the Coleco execs getting them to pull the game from the show floor.

Also, the mishap was not over Donkey Kong on the Colecovision, but rather Coleco's enhanced Donkey Kong (Super Donkey Kong) running on it's Adam computer (which was available in standalone and Colecovision expansion module versions). Atari had the exclusive license for home computer versions. Coleco thought they could skirt around it because of the Colecovision/Adam expansion format. Likewiswe Colecovision's Donkey Kong was the pack-in with the console, which had been out almost a year already - there was no issue with it.

Additionally, I usually try not to use Steve's book as a reference for anything other than quotes. He tried to cover so much that unfortunately the fact checking suffered in the process, and it's full of errors.

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