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Child of Eden


Vemsie
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Post-game spoiler:

Challenge Mode may offer a purer experience than even the main game, with its relentless electronica and stripped-down attack waves. It's like playing the stargate sequence from 2001. I don't know how long it goes on for but it gets punishing pretty quickly.

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Is there much scope for score attack?

from gamefaqs:

All you need is a basic knowledge of rhythm.

As we all know, preforming an "Octa-lock" and releasing it in time with the music gives you a score multiplier. Do this enough times and you will reach "x8" multiplier.

Now the trick is to keep that "x8" multiplier going from the start of the level to the end and there are 2 way of doing this.

1- Tapping your feet or just singing the rhythm. So lets say you are tapping the beat "1-2-3-4" in 4/4 time, you release the "Octa-lock" during any of those beats and you will not lose the score multiplier, so don't be afraid to release on 2 or on 3 because you are still in time. this is all made easier by following step 2.

2- Take your time when fighting bosses. Don't rush releasing the lock in favour of purifying the boss or whatever enemy quickly, take your time (but not too much as the enemy escapes) and make sure you release with the beat. Also you will notice that since you are not spamming the octa-lock and taking your time, you will get fired upon more, keep the rhythm tapping while you tracer deal with the projectiles and then go back to the octa-lock in time method.

*also note that hitting a 7-lock or lower out of time will not ruin your multiplier, only messing up an octa-lock will reset it.

I tried this method a couple of times and it landed me at 30 in the world on the matrix level using a controller, I imagine that I can reach the top 10 using Kinect as the reticule is bigger and keeping time with your whole body is easier (also called dancing.).

Try it out and let me know what you think.

http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/997620-child-of-eden/59467318

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Yeah so against better judgement I played this with Kinect when I got home last night - holy fuck it's amazing. It IS Rez2 in super HD next-gen o-vision - the amount of stuff onscreen is crazy at times and the whole kinect integration works tremendously. I noticed the kinect seems a lot more accurate in this over the first wave of games (much less lag in moving the pointer onscreen) and the snappier menus are most welcome.

More tonight with a sober head and the lights off.

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It's pissing rain here in Dublin at the moment but I'm about to brave them there elements to pick this up. I am very, very excited.

Oh sweet baby G, I'm excited. Going to draw them curtains, turn that shit up to 11 and get well blunted.

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Well, this is fucking awesome. :omg:

I was playing with such gusto last night, that I've actually caused myself a bit of a shoulder injury. Not sure what I've done, pulled a muscle or something from sharply pushing forward, but it kept me awake last night and has probably ruled out any Kinect play for the next couple of days.:lol:

Remember kids, always do your warm up exercises before you liberate a psychedelic space whale.

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Just finished the main mode of this. My initial impressions are that it's very good, a worthy successor to Rez, but not quite as good. I'll probably give Rez HD a run-through now since it's been quite a while since I last played it and it's always difficult to fairly compare a game you've owned for a day with one you have memories of spanning years. The reasons I think it's a slightly lesser game are:

- The music. It's a different style of music to Rez, which in itself i don't consider a bad thing, but on the whole i just didn't find it especially memorable and it had a tendency to blend into one from level to level. Despite the remixing it's still fairly sugary and not really as atmospheric or 'hard' as Rez's music. Personal taste will come into play here obviously, but after playing some of these stages multiple times I'm struggling to remember much of the soundtrack beyond Heavenly Star.

- Not quite as many wow moments. It has some gorgeous visuals, and at least three spine-tingling moments that I can think of off-hand, but I'm not sure there's anything here that matches, say, The Running Man boss in terms of excitement, intensity and uniqueness. Which brings me onto...

-The final level. Even before I played Child of Eden I knew it was going to be a tough ask for the last level to live up to Rez's. I consider Level 5 of Rez to be one of the best levels of anything I've ever played and i doubt anyone who has played it will ever forget it. It's a massive ask to live up to but Child of Eden doesn't even try. I can understand not wanting to do a retread, and I won't go into any more details than that, but people won't be reminiscing over Level 5 of Child Of Eden in several years time.

I honestly don't mean to sound down on the game, it's really good, it's just the difference between Child Of Eden being an 8 game and Rez being a 9 or 10 game, in my opinion.

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Playing without Kinect, but I have to agree with everyone here. It's simply amazing. Beautiful visuals, sound, and a wonderful experience. I am jealous of how easy it must be just doing those sweeping curves to take out arcs of purple bullets with kinect though.

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I dont have Kinect, is it worth getting to play this?

If you're not interested in any other Kinect games at all I'd have to say no, it's too expensive just to use as a pointer in one game imo. Without Kinect it controls exactly like Rez so it's up to you as to whether moving your hand around to control the cursor is worth 100 quid, or however much it costs now. I made a fairly long post outlining the differences on the last page, it's swings and roundabouts really.

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Just picked it up today and am trying to get by the third level at the moment.

Was and still am a big fan of Rez and still play it on the xbox till this day and thought I`d post my opinions and differences between the 2.

First of the soundtrack, as others have mentioned hasn`t blown me away and is no where near as memorable or energetic as Rez. The thing is with Child of Eden though, is that it has more of a flowing feeling to it than Rez and in that respect a faster thumping Techno soundtrack wouldn`t suit this game. Until I`ve had I few plays through though, I will reserve judgement on the Child of Eden soundtrack.

Visually, very impressive and imaginative and 60fps to. Easily a worthy successor to Rez. By what I`ve seen of the first three levels, each lvl has it`s own unique feel and look to it.

Difficulty has been ramped up alot compared to Rez and must of took me 3 or 4 goes to complete the 2nd level. 3rd level I`m struggling abit to.

Upto yet though, really enjoying it and can`t wait to dig into it later on tonight.

Note: Those of you with 5.1 setup, go into options and enable 5.1 as It`s set to stereo by default. If you want your score on, put Hud to "all"

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I just finished the main "story" mode and watched the credits roll - I have to admit that I made a complete mess of the finale and any notion of maintaining rhythm for multipliers quickly went out the window. :P I don't know if my years of playing Rez influence my opinion, but I found Child of Eden more difficult; having to swap between tracer and octolock, as well as maintaining rhythm on the octolock, gives the player much more to think about - I imagine when I replay it with prior knowledge of the patterns I can enjoy the ride a bit more without having to focus so much... Oh, and of the main archives, my favourites were probably Matrix and Beauty, although I expect my opinion will change several times after extended play.

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The game is definitely harder than Rez with a controller, I've just gone back to playing it with Kinect to compare and the game seems much easier with Kinect. The cursor is faster, it's bigger, and it's much easier to see when you've got 8 lock-ons. I also found it easier to maintain the rhythm and multiplier playing with Kinect than with the controller, maybe because it's easier to feel the beat with your body free than when you're holding a controller? I don't know, but I do know I've just 5 starred the first two levels with Kinect with more than double my previous highest scores with the controller. Bottom line is both methods work well and both have their advantages and drawbacks so people should be happy whether they have Kinect or not, I don't think either actually has a clear advantage now that I've found you can play it sitting down with Kinect with a controller in your lap for rumble.

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Just finished the normal mode as well,

You can see that Mizuguchi has clearly some stuff in mind, the bosses and patterns are pure Rez, especially the way you spin around them, the geometrical shapes and the pulsating lights.

Its got so much more going on than Rez. the color coding its similar to Ikaruga, there is a bittle of a puzzle game mixed in there, and the ability to shoot down bullets so easily makes it so that bosses put up a bit of a challenge.

The problem with sequels could not be clearer than here: it's harder, more complex, and different from a much loved game, but it shares the same DNA.

Would it have been better if it had the same type of music/gameplay/etc of Rez? maybe so, but Rez is such a good game that trying to copy Rez would have been a bad move anyway.

So, its more of the same, but different. where next for Mizuguchi?

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I agree that it doesn't reach the heights of Rez, but that game is so beloved by its fans (myself included) that nothing ever could. Any successor can only refine or tweak the ideas that are already there, so you're already on the road to a less impactful experience. CoE has plenty of great moments... perhaps nothing to match the appearance of the running man or certainly Area 5 (though some of the Passion archive comes close) but I think it can proudly stand alongside its predecessor.

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Wow, I had forgotten how bare Rez is, it's really interesting going back to it after Child of Eden. Obviously the minimalist wireframe look is deliberate but after the pure sugar rush, sensory overload of Child of Eden it seems very sparse. Oh god I'm so fickle :lol:

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Im on lvl 4 now, is this level even possible with a pad? Cant do the boss, throwing to much purple shit at me all the time. Have the feeling i might need to nick my brothers kinect for abit if i want to finish it.

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early days first impression. played through matrix twice. this shooting with the beat is tricky on kinect. i was very good at it with rez but it seems like there's a delay between moving and shooting that's making me miss-time my shots. that said, i have got up to 8x multiplier so it is possible.

i think i might be winding back before throwing my hands forward but then my hands are already forward when i'm playing so i kinda have to pull my hand back before throwing it forward so it's not easy to time right. i dunno, i'm sure i'll get the hang, CofE on kinnect just isn't the same as rez on a controller. it's quite good fun though innit? :)

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You didn't have to shoot with the beat in Rez did you? To my knowledge the multiplier was just based on how many enemies you could string together at once, whereas Eden is about stringing 8 together and then shooting on the beat and building the multiplier up. There seems to be more intricacy to Eden's scoring system. Firing the purple gun won't break your multiplier and neither will stringing together, say, 5 enemies, so long as you fire on the beat, but you won't get multiplied points until you go back to stringing 8 together. I think that's how it works anyway. There's definitely more stuff you have to take into account.

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Back when I worked at Sega Europe in 2001 I was the Lead Tester on Rez on both the Dreamcast and the PS2. When we got a pre-alpha build of the game in, when it was still called K-Project, I was asked to come up with some suggestions for the game. I asked around the team and got a fair amount of feedback from the guys. One of my suggestions was to let the player fire their weapon in time with the beat to build up their score, but when the report was sent off to Japan it was met with a fairly typical reply for this kind of feedback from QA, "We don't have time to implement any of these now, but we'll take them onboard should we make a sequel".

Skip forward ten years and the sequel to Rez is released. This game features a gameplay mechanic that allows the user to fire their weapon to the beat of the music to rack up a higher score multiplier.

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Grabbed this today, absolutely bloody love it. It kind of justifies my Kinect purchase, though also it's great to get back into the Rez mindset. It's actually a Kinect game which not only do I feel most ocnnected with, but also I wrestle the least with. It took me a bit of time to realise I should only use one arm for tracer fire instead of two (doh!). Actually, the fact I get hot and sweaty (sorry) while playing it makes it feel even more like a euphoric nightclub experience. The purple tracer definitely adds a layer to it which Rez probably lacked. Interesting to see how it plays with controller.

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